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Coronavirus Live Updates: New U.S. Cases Hit Fresh Record

Nearly 46 million people have now been infected with the coronavirus world-wide, and nearly 1.19 million have died.

U.K.: Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s cabinet was due to meet Saturday to discuss plans for a new nationwide lockdown in England to curb the virus’s spread, according to a government official, who stressed a final decision hasn’t been made. Scientists at Imperial College London estimate infections are running at almost 100,000 a day in England, and hospitalizations and deaths are creeping up. The seven-day average for deaths hit 213 on Tuesday, its highest tally since May.

The government has been experimenting with localized restrictions in England but cases have continued rising. Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland set their own public-health policies and have already closed some businesses and imposed curbs on household mixing. Mr. Johnson is due to hold a televised press conference at 4:00 p.m. London time on Saturday.

Greece: New restrictions, including mandatory mask wearing indoors and outdoors, will be take effect in Greece starting Tuesday. Other measures include a midnight to 5 a.m. curfew, and university courses will revert to online learning. In the Athens region and northern Greece, where the virus is circulating at higher levels, the government has also ordered the closure of bars, restaurants, theaters, museums and gyms.

While Greece has among the lowest infection rates in Europe, new cases are rising rapidly. Announcing the new measures, Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis said the goal was to prevent the virus from spreading out of control.

“We must act now, before the intensive-care units are overwhelmed by people fighting for their life. Now, while we still have the ability to detect and track cases,” he said in a televised address.

India: The new-case count was below 50,000 for the sixth day in a row, with the country reporting 48,268 cases over the preceding 24 hours, and 551 deaths. Confirmed cases now exceed 8.1 million, with a death toll of 121,641.

Japan: The 778 new cases reported Saturday pushed the total past 100,000, and the 11 deaths brought the toll to 1,755. Starting Sunday, the government will allow business travelers returning from trips of seven days or less to any country to skip the two-week quarantine, provided they meet conditions including a negative test result.

The government has also lowered travel alerts on nine countries including China, South Korea and Australia. From Sunday onward, travelers from those countries won’t be required to take a coronavirus test upon arrival.

South Korea: With 127 new Covid-19 cases reported, it was the fourth consecutive day above 100. Locally transmitted infections have been rising this week, with new clusters around workplaces and social gatherings. Local authorities are on high alert this weekend, concerned that Halloween festivities could prompt a fresh wave.

China: Mainland Chinese authorities reported six new locally transmitted symptomatic cases, all in and around the city of Kashgar in the far western Xinjiang region and previously classified as asymptomatic. Chinese health authorities typically highlight and focus on positive cases showing

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Columbus nonprofits to provide fresh food, pharmacy care to South Linden

Emma Scott Moran
 
| The Columbus Dispatch

The Charitable Pharmacy of Central Ohio will open a second location addressing low-income Franklin County residents’ food and pharmaceutical needs with its “Farmacy in the City” program. 

The nonprofit’s new site, co-located with Community Development for All People, will feature a pharmacy and fresh food market under one roof. Here, vulnerable Franklin County residents can receive non-narcotic prescription medicine, pharmacy services and healthy food at no cost. 

“Our patients may not have access to healthy food and other resources that you need to stay in those healthy habits to reduce your disease burden,” Charitable Pharmacy executive director Jennifer Seifert said. “We’re really excited now that when someone says, ‘I don’t know what to eat,’ we can bring some resources around them.”

Since 2010, CPCO has contributed $50 million in pharmacy services and prescription medicine, today serving over 60,000 Franklin county residents living at or below 200% of the federal poverty level.

More: Charitable Pharmacy sees more patients, more costs due to COVID-19

CPCO’s model is different from that of free clinics. Pharmacists spend time with patients to understand their medical history, explain the impact of their prescribed medicine and create an action plan for the future, development director Melanie Boyd said.

Despite this decade of positive impact, it’s clear that sometimes medicine isn’t the most pressing need when patients walk through the pharmacy’s doors. Basic needs such as food, shelter and clothing often take precedence. 

After receiving a $1.5 million grant from the Franklin County Board of Commissioners in 2019, CPCO began exploring communities where its support could have the most impact and identified South Linden as a place where it could help the neighborhood achieve better health outcomes.

The unfortunate truth is that one’s zip code often determines the quality of their health care.

“You go to the suburbs and look at how many pharmacies you have per capita — it’s a real different story in some other sections of the city,” Boyd said. “We know that coming in (to South Linden) as a charitable pharmacy to work with the existing pharmacies, we’re going to be able to meet more of that need.” 

When the Rev. John Edgar, executive director of Community Development for All People, approached the pharmacy about sharing Eagle Market — a South Linden carryout shut down by the city in 2016 — CPCO jumped on the opportunity. 

“Seventy percent of our patients are either screened positive for malnutrition or express food insecurity,” Boyd said. “That was one of the reasons this was just obvious, it was just such a clear fit.”

South Linden currently has no full-service grocery store, and this food scarcity has a measurable impact. Its residents have a life expectancy of just under 70 years, seven years less than the Franklin County average. 

The “Farmacy in the City” hopes to improve this disparity by fulfilling food and health needs and emphasizing the idea of “food as medicine.”

A $149,444 grant from the Connections for Cardiovascular

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