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medicine

How to Reap the Benefits of Food as Medicine

Development & Aid, Featured, Food & Agriculture, Food Security and Nutrition, Food Sustainability, Global, Headlines, Health, Humanitarian Emergencies, Inequity, TerraViva United Nations

Sorghum is has nutritional and health benefits. Small scale farmer, Catherine Sibanda examines her sorghum crop in field, in Jambezi District, Zimbabwe, March 2015. Credit: Busani Bafana / IPS

BULAWAYO, Dec 2 2020 (IPS) – COVID-19 has magnified global food insecurity and is driving unhealthy eating and worsening malnutrition, food experts say. They have called for deliberate global investment in food as medicine on the back of growing diet-related illnesses.

Famed Greek physician, Hippocrates, foretold the future of food. He is attributed to have said: ‘Let food be thy medicine and let medicine be thy food’. COVID-19 has pushed the conversation about food as medicine onto the world agenda as more people are paying attention to their health and increasingly what they eat.

“COVID 19 has exposed American population to infectious diseases, and it has started off the conversation around food is medicine and how we need to reset our food system to create higher quality and more nutrient-dense food,” physician and author, Mark Hyman, told a plenary session at the virtual ‘Resetting the Food System from Farm to Fork’ dialogue co-hosted by the Barilla Centre for Food and Nutrition (BCFN) and Food Tank.

Hyman said a rejigged food system which creates better health for the population was a good strategy for pandemic resistance. He said food as medicine is part of medical care because it works better and faster and cheaper than most drugs and is probably the most effective treatment we have for most chronic illnesses.

“Science is clear that more nutrient density and food quality plays a huge role in human health and the protector foods, foods that protect you against disease and have medicinal properties,” said Hyman. He proposed the eating of more inexpensive, plant-based foods. “We need to rethink farming and introduce more nutrient-dense foods.”

Early this year, the United Nations warned that the pandemic would escalate a global food crisis – the worst in 50 years. The international body said the pandemic would make nutrition beyond the reach of many.

“Our food systems are failing, and the COVID-19 pandemic is making things worse,” UN Secretary-General, Antonio Guterres, warned, proposing three action plan to bolster a failing food system.

Guterres said countries should designate food and nutrition services as essential while implementing protections for those who work in the sector, prioritise food supply chains and strengthen social protection for young children, pregnant and breastfeeding women, older people and other at-risk groups. He also advocated the transformation of food systems for a more inclusive and sustainable world.

More than 820 million people in the world do not have enough to eat even though there is plenty of food to feed everyone. Globally, some 144 million children under five years are stunted as a result of malnutrition.

The UN has warned that nearly 690 million people, or 8.9 percent of the world’s population, were undernourished

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medicine

Philip Sharp: Senior with cancer chooses between medicine and food – Entertainment – Austin American-Statesman

Philip Sharp is battling a case of the sniffles, but, beyond that, he says he’s feeling good.

He’s got his cat of 13 years, Sweetheart. He’s talked to his daughter, Jessica, recently, and the PBS signal is still coming in strong.

You’d never know that days earlier the soft-spoken Sharp had finished his most recent round of chemotherapy treatment.

Sharp is not prone to self-pity or asking for much help. On the day in question, as he stands in his modest apartment talking to me via a Zoom connection facilitated by his case manager with Family Eldercare, Sharp expresses gratitude for the assistance he’s received and the minimal side effects of the treatments for a cancerous lesion recently removed from his bladder. He also is slated to undergo gallbladder removal surgery in the spring.

While his polite demeanor and tender nature serve as no sign for concern, the truth is that recently the 65-year-old, who lives alone with Sweetheart, was dangerously close to having to make this choice: paying for medicine or paying for food.

On lean days like those, Sharp turned to a simple diet of canned beans. You’d be hard-pressed to get him to complain about it. He will talk about food, however. The things he loves. Like a pizza loaded with meat. Tacos. And the Hungry Man meals that Jessica delivered to him recently.

Sharp has lived in Austin since 1998, and while he’s had a long tenure in town, his social circle remains limited. He turns to online chat rooms to make friends with folks his age and talk about their lifestyles, and finds joy in watching PBS shows about American history and science.

“I’m not a real socialite,” Sharp says.

Sharp, who successfully manages schizoaffective disorder through a medication regimen, studied chemistry in college. The jazz flutist also studied music, forestry and computer science but eventually cut short a college education that included stints at Stephen F. Austin University and what is now Texas State University.

“It was all so boring; I couldn’t take it anymore,” Sharp says dryly.

After a period of homelessness following a divorce and car accident, Sharp received assistance from Family Eldercare, the organization that nominated him for Season for Caring, which helped stabilize his living situation.

The nonprofit has assisted Sharp, who lives off of disability benefits, with the stress of managing his finances and staying on top of his medical appointments and mounting bills. For that, Sharp is very grateful.

“It makes me feel very comforted to know somebody is going to be there,” Sharp says.

More Season for Caring.

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dentist

Dentist turns Pilgrim to fill Thanksgiving food baskets

SHELTON — While it’s been a family tradition for the past 34 years, Bruce Sofferman said he knows the Valley needs him more than ever this year.

Wednesday, as he has done for decades, the Shelton dentist will don his Pilgrim clothes and friend Brendan Carey of Carey and Guarrera Real Estate will be dressed as a turkey.

Together they’ll stand in the Smile Dental Center parking lot, 1000 Bridgeport Ave., accepting donations of money, canned goods or frozen turkeys that will be handed over to the Valley Food Bank.

They’ll be out there from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.


“I want this to be our best year ever,” said Sofferman, who started the tradition with his wife, Deborah, and their infant daughter, Sophia, now 33, at their original practice in Derby. “I’d like to have enough food for 750 meal baskets.”

That’s about 250 more than normal.

But 2020 has not been a normal year. The COVID-19 pandemic that brought illness, shutdowns and layoffs made certain of that.

“Donations are down and needs are up because of the pandemic,” said Susan Agamy, the executive director of the Spooner House and its Valley Food Bank which will be distributing the meals Sofferman collects. “I’m glad they’re doing it again this year.”

Things will be different this year. For the first time Sofferman’s wife and daughter won’t be participating because they are away. Taking their place will be Chaz from WPLR’s Chaz and A.J. show.

Donors are asked to stay in their cars, pack the food in a bag or a box and place it in their trunk for Sofferman to retrieve.

And this, unlike previous years, may be the Valley’s only pre-Thanksgiving food collection to benefit Spooner House and Valley Food Bank.

“It’s the biggest one we have confirmed,” Agamy said.

Last week, the Seymour Police Department canceled a planned food collection out of health concerns to donors and its officers because of rising COVID-19 rates. All the Valley municipalities are red listed by the state because their rates of infection are more than 15 per 100,000 people and rising.

“Some of the churches that used to ask parishioners for donations of turkeys are requesting gift cards this year,” Agamy said.

Sofferman will take those also.

“We’ll use them to buy frozen turkeys,” he said. “During this pandemic, people are no longer just living paycheck to paycheck. Times have gotten worse. We want them to know people care.”

In addition to frozen turkeys, Agamy suggests people donate canned fruits, vegetables and soups, stuffing, cake, brownie and cornbread mixes, powered potatoes, cranberry sauce, gravy, tea and coffee. She also said there is a need for pancake mixes and cereals.

“We’d like to put together a box that can feed eight to 10 people,” she said.

Local residents seeking food help must apply with the Valley Food Bank for a basket. Applications are based on need and those accepted will be called to pick up the box at the Todd Road facility.

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medicine

Penn Medicine researchers find link between food insecurity and cardiovascular death risk

PHILADELPHIA–Food insecurity is one of the nation’s leading health and nutrition issues–about 13.7 million (10.5 percent) of households in the United States were food insecure at some time during 2019, a trend likely to increase in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. According to preliminary research conducted by researchers at Penn Medicine, increasing rates of food insecurity in counties across the United States are independently associated with an increase in cardiovascular death rates among adults between the ages of 20 and 64.

The large-scale, national study, which will be presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2020, provides evidence of the link between food insecurity and increased risk of cardiovascular death. This is one of the first national analyses to evaluate changes in both food security and cardiovascular mortality over time, and to see if changes in food insecurity impact cardiovascular health. The findings were also published today in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

“This research gives us a better understanding of the connection between economic distress and cardiovascular disease,” said Sameed Khatana, MD, MPH, senior author of the study and instructor of Cardiovascular Medicine in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. “What’s going on outside the clinic has significant impact on patients’ health. There are many factors beyond the medications we may be prescribing that can influence their wellbeing, food insecurity being one of them.”

Researchers analyzed data from the National Center for Health Statistics and the Map the Meal Gap study, to examine county-level cardiovascular death rates and food insecurity rates from 2011 to 2017, among adults age 20 to 64, and those 65 years and older.

The researchers found that while the overall food insecurity rates for the entire country declined between 2011 and 2017, the counties that had the most increase in food insecurity levels had cardiovascular death rates that increased from 82 to 87 per 100,000 individuals. Additionally, for every 1 percent increase in food insecurity, there was a similar increase in cardiovascular mortality among non-elderly adults (0.83 percent).

“There has been a growing disparity when it comes to food insecurity, and this data demonstrates that parts of the country are being left behind. Unfortunately, this may only get worse as the country grapples with the ramifications of the COVID-19 pandemic,” Khatana said. “However, interventions that improve a community’s economic wellbeing could potentially lead to improved community cardiovascular health.”

The authors intend to study whether interventions that improve food insecurity can lead to better cardiovascular health.

###

The abstract will be presented in Session QU.AOS.765 Social Determinants of Cardiovascular Health on November 13, 2020, at 9:00 am CST/10:00 am EST.

Penn co-authors include, Atheendar S. Venkataramani, Christina A. Roberto, Lauren A. Eberly, and Peter W. Groeneveld, along with Yale’s Stephen Y. Wang.

Penn Medicine is one of the world’s leading academic medical centers, dedicated to the related missions of medical education, biomedical research, and excellence in patient care. Penn Medicine consists of the Raymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine at

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fitness

Football, food and aerial Yoga: Elli AvrRam’s first Maldives trip is sure to kick in your travel bug, amp up fitness goals – travel

Home / Travel / Football, food and aerial Yoga: Elli AvrRam’s first Maldives trip is sure to kick in your travel bug, amp up fitness goals

Elli AvrRam’s sultry bikini looks, billiards-chess-football game and “very tough” aerial Yoga session in these throwback pictures from her first Maldives trip are sure to give you major weekend vibes

travel
Updated: Nov 08, 2020, 18:16 IST

Elli AvrRam’s first Maldives trip is sure to kick in your travel bug, amp up fitness goals
Elli AvrRam’s first Maldives trip is sure to kick in your travel bug, amp up fitness goals(Instagram/elliavrram)

For those who are still locked in for safety reasons amid Covid-19 quarantine, Malang star Elli AvrRam has the perfect virtual escape to offer and her flood of pictures from the Maldives are proof. From the Bollywood diva’s sultry bikini look to billiards, chess and football game or “very tough” aerial Yoga session, the throwback pictures from her first Maldives trip are sure to give you major weekend vibes.

Elli has kept fans on Instagram hooked with her regular updates from the island nation and we can’t help but take travel and fitness inspiration from the same. While one picture showed her in a blue and peach bikini teamed with an orange coloured sheer shrug, another picture showed her enjoying a floating breakfast inside a pool while donning a fuchsia pink bikini.

    

Elli also tried her hands at Jet-skiing, snorkelling and swinging over the turquoise ocean waters at the Kandima Maldives resort.

   

When it came to sports, Elli was seen slaying in monochromic ensemble with a white net top and a black skirt to match with the colours of chess, a blue and peach bikini while aiming for the balls on billiards table and a blue jersey-black shorts while playing soccer. She captioned the football video, “I LOVE playing soccer! (For fun of course) When joining @deannepanday on a trip, there’s no ‘lazing around’…it’s all about fun activities and good vibes Thank you @kamakarma for getting us to play a bit with the boys from team Kandima Ps. observe how the goalkeeper is being too kind in not catching the ball ha ha….good times! (sic).”

   

Donning a green halter-neck top paired with green athleisure shorts, Elli even tried aerial Yoga during her vacay. She shared in the caption, “Finally got to try out Aerial Yoga Very tough and so much fun! (Video coming soon lol)” sic.

  

Elli wrapped up her trip this weekend but as she returned home, fans travel bug has been kicked in while their fitness goals amplified courtesy the actor’s motivating pictures and videos from the Maldives.

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medicine

GW University Tells Students: Buy a Week of Food and Medicine to Prep for Election Chaos

An email sent to George Washington University Students Friday suggested students prep for election week the way they would a hurricane or snowstorm. “Before Tuesday, we recommend you have at least one week of food, supplies, and medicine for your room,” the email says.

Large numbers of protesters and demonstrators are expected in the District this week, including thousands tonight at Black Lives Matter Plaza. Currently, DC officials say they’re not aware of any credible threats of violence in the District, and that while parking will be restricted downtown tonight and tomorrow, they haven’t called up the National Guard or recommended businesses board up.

Many businesses have still decided to take extra precautions by boarding up or closing, and it seems individual Washingtonians have done the same — some local supermarkets have been depleted of food staples like meat and eggs.

Jane Recker

Assistant Editor

Jane is a Chicago transplant who now calls Cleveland Park her home. Before joining Washingtonian, she wrote for Smithsonian Magazine and the Chicago Sun-Times. She is a graduate of Northwestern University, where she studied journalism and opera.

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health

Frozen Food Packages in China Keep Testing Positive For Coronavirus. Here’s Why Health Experts Aren’t Worried

They’ve reportedly found it on packages of Ecuadorian shrimp, squid from Russia and Norwegian seafood.



a man preparing food in a room: Medical workers wearing protective suits collect samples from imported frozen beef for COVID-19 tests at a food factory in Shanghai, China on August 18, 2020.


© Yin Liqin—China News Service/Getty Images
Medical workers wearing protective suits collect samples from imported frozen beef for COVID-19 tests at a food factory in Shanghai, China on August 18, 2020.

Since June, Chinese health authorities have been detecting genetic traces of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, on refrigerated and frozen foods from around the world. Then, on Oct. 17, the Chinese Centers for Disease Control (CDC) announced it had isolated active SARS-CoV-2 on packs of imported fish. The agency says this world-first discovery, made while tracing a recent outbreak in Qingdao to two dock workers, shows contaminated food packaging can cause infections.

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While it remains unclear if the dock workers actually contracted COVID-19 from the seafood they were handling, the government is stepping up precautions. Qingdao will now scrutinize all incoming frozen food (after testing all 9 million residents), while the Beijing city government has urged companies to avoid importing frozen foods from countries badly hit by the pandemic — though it did not specify which ones.

Concern over possible transmission through imported food is running high in China, which has nearly stamped out domestic transmission of the pathogen. It is one of the only countries to impose wide-scale coronavirus inspections on incoming shipments.

Elsewhere, health authorities have been more skeptical. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control says there is “no evidence” to suggest food is associated with spreading the virus, while the World Health Organization (WHO) says it’s not necessary to disinfect food packaging. New Zealand meanwhile ruled out a theory that an August outbreak was connected to a cold-chain storage facility.

Read more: Wuhan Strives to Return to Normal, But Scars From the Pandemic Run

China’s CDC says 670,000 samples from frozen foods and packaging had been tested for COVID-19 as of Sept. 15. Reportedly, only 22 of them were positive (and prior to the Qingdao case it was not clear if any of the detected coronavirus was still active when thawed).

In recent months, the world’s second-largest economy has nevertheless temporarily suspended a slew of fish and meat imports, disrupting trade with several countries and reportedly causing shipping bottlenecks.

Several health experts have disputed the necessity of such precautions. While cold temperatures can preserve coronaviruses, they remain doubtful food and its packaging pose a major threat.

“It’s theoretically plausible, but the risk is much lower than the other more established routes of transmission for this virus,” says Siddharth Sridhar, a microbiologist at the University of Hong Kong (HKU).

What has China found?

China stepped up monitoring of imported foods after a second wave in June that infected 335 people was linked to Beijing’s sprawling Xinfadi market. The outbreak, which broke the capital’s run of 56 consecutive days without any new local infections, prompted a partial shutdown of the city and a probe into the origins.

Authorities suggested supplies of salmon from Europe may have been the source after

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health

Power out due to Hurricane Zeta? Here’s how long the food in your fridge, freezer will last | Hurricane Center

If you’re living in the New Orleans metro area, you likely don’t have power right now. 

Aside from wondering when the lights will come back on, your next thought might be figuring out what to do the food in your refrigerator or freezer. 



About 470,000 people without power in Louisiana after Hurricane Zeta

Most of the outages are in the New Orleans metro area.

If the power is still out at your home, do not open your freezer or refrigerator if possible.

Fridges will typically keep food cold for about four hours if not opened, according to the Food and Drug Administration. A full freezer should maintain a safe temperature for about 48 hours if the door stays closed as well. If your freezer is half-full, it should maintain its temp for about 24 hours. 

In the meantime, it’s a good idea to fill up an ice chest with ice and add perishable foods to enjoy until power is restored. 

Once the power is back, though, it’s time to start clearing out what might be spoiled. If your refrigerator reads 40 degrees or lower and the freezer reads 0 when you re-open it, your food should be safe, and frozen food that still retains ice crystals should be safe.

Hurricane Zeta may have sped its way across metro New Orleans, but what it left in its wake were downed trees, streets littered with debris an…

A general rule of thumb: Perishable food that is held at temperatures higher than 40 degrees for more than two hours may be unsafe to eat. That is because bacteria multiply quickly between 40 and 140 degrees.

Even foods that are deemed safe to eat should be thoroughly heated and cooked to minimum safe temperatures.

And, as always, when in doubt throw it out.

For more tips on preparing for a hurricane or power outage, head here.



Preparing for a hurricane: What to buy, what to eat, what to throw out in your kitchen

Now is the time to check your hurricane prep supplies. Along with generators, battery-powered radios or TVs, flashlights, electric candles (so…

Ann Maloney contributed to this report. 


MORE COVERAGE:



When will power come back on in New Orleans? Entergy hopes to get it fixed 'through the weekend'

About 400,000 Entergy customers were without power as of 7 a.m. 

90% to have electricity restored within 10 days, Entergy says



Jefferson Parish asks residents to stay home, limit warm water usage after Hurricane Zeta: report

Traffic lights are out throughout the parish.



Why did Hurricane Zeta intensify so quickly? Lack of wind shear, forecaster says

Forecasters underestimated storm’s strength but nailed its track

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medicine

Columbus nonprofits to provide fresh food, pharmacy care to South Linden

Emma Scott Moran
 
| The Columbus Dispatch

The Charitable Pharmacy of Central Ohio will open a second location addressing low-income Franklin County residents’ food and pharmaceutical needs with its “Farmacy in the City” program. 

The nonprofit’s new site, co-located with Community Development for All People, will feature a pharmacy and fresh food market under one roof. Here, vulnerable Franklin County residents can receive non-narcotic prescription medicine, pharmacy services and healthy food at no cost. 

“Our patients may not have access to healthy food and other resources that you need to stay in those healthy habits to reduce your disease burden,” Charitable Pharmacy executive director Jennifer Seifert said. “We’re really excited now that when someone says, ‘I don’t know what to eat,’ we can bring some resources around them.”

Since 2010, CPCO has contributed $50 million in pharmacy services and prescription medicine, today serving over 60,000 Franklin county residents living at or below 200% of the federal poverty level.

More: Charitable Pharmacy sees more patients, more costs due to COVID-19

CPCO’s model is different from that of free clinics. Pharmacists spend time with patients to understand their medical history, explain the impact of their prescribed medicine and create an action plan for the future, development director Melanie Boyd said.

Despite this decade of positive impact, it’s clear that sometimes medicine isn’t the most pressing need when patients walk through the pharmacy’s doors. Basic needs such as food, shelter and clothing often take precedence. 

After receiving a $1.5 million grant from the Franklin County Board of Commissioners in 2019, CPCO began exploring communities where its support could have the most impact and identified South Linden as a place where it could help the neighborhood achieve better health outcomes.

The unfortunate truth is that one’s zip code often determines the quality of their health care.

“You go to the suburbs and look at how many pharmacies you have per capita — it’s a real different story in some other sections of the city,” Boyd said. “We know that coming in (to South Linden) as a charitable pharmacy to work with the existing pharmacies, we’re going to be able to meet more of that need.” 

When the Rev. John Edgar, executive director of Community Development for All People, approached the pharmacy about sharing Eagle Market — a South Linden carryout shut down by the city in 2016 — CPCO jumped on the opportunity. 

“Seventy percent of our patients are either screened positive for malnutrition or express food insecurity,” Boyd said. “That was one of the reasons this was just obvious, it was just such a clear fit.”

South Linden currently has no full-service grocery store, and this food scarcity has a measurable impact. Its residents have a life expectancy of just under 70 years, seven years less than the Franklin County average. 

The “Farmacy in the City” hopes to improve this disparity by fulfilling food and health needs and emphasizing the idea of “food as medicine.”

A $149,444 grant from the Connections for Cardiovascular

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health

North America Food Allergen Testing Market Forecast to 2027

The North America food allergen testing market is expected to grow from US$ 201. 33 million in 2018 to US$ 403. 90 million by 2027; it is estimated to grow at a CAGR of 8. 1% from 2019 to 2027. Anaphylaxis and food allergy are among leading causes of public health risk in developed countries such as the US and Canada.

New York, Oct. 27, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Reportlinker.com announces the release of the report “North America Food Allergen Testing Market Forecast to 2027 – COVID-19 Impact and Regional Analysis by Source, Technology, and Food Tested” – https://www.reportlinker.com/p05978897/?utm_source=GNW
Although the prevalence is higher in young children, recent studies indicate it is becoming more common in adolescents and young adults.

Moreover, there is growing evidence of the increasing prevalence of food allergies in rapidly developing countries.Food allergy incidence is rapidly rising in developed regions such as North America.

According to the Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE), ~32 million people in the US have some kind of food allergies. ~11% of people between the age group 18–26 million adults have food allergies in the US. ~40% of children in the country have multiple food allergies, i.e., they are allergic to more than one food type. In the US, 200,000 people require emergency medical care every year for allergic reactions caused due to food. The country also witnessed 377% increase in medical procedures to treat anaphylaxis or food allergies from 2007 to 2016. This further bolsters the growth of the food allergen testing market
In 2018, the milk segment led the North America food allergen testing market, based on source.Milk, as well as milk product, allergy is one of the most commonly found food allergies among children.

Cow milk is one of the usual causes of milk allergies; however, milk from sheep, buffalo, goats, and other mammals can also cause allergic reactions, which occur occurs soon after the consumption of milk.Signs and symptoms of milk allergy range from mild to severe, and they include vomiting, wheezing, hives, and digestive problems, varying from person to person.

Milk allergy can also cause anaphylaxis, a severe, life-threatening reaction.Avoiding milk and milk products is the prime solutions to avoid complications associated with milk allergies.

Apart from the symptoms mentioned above, immediate signs and symptoms might include itching or tingling feeling around the lips or mouth; swelling of the lips, tongue, or throat; and coughing or shortness of breath.
Presently, major countries in North America are under lockdown due to the COVID 19 pandemic.In the high-impact countries in the region, isolation and social distancing measures have been put in place.

The lesser production of goods and commodities is hampering the growth of the North America food allergen testing market as the demand for these solutions has declined over the past couple of months.The US has reported the highest number of confirmed cases of as the disease in this region.

The outbreak and measures taken to contain the infection spread are likely to impact the food &

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