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Rescheduling Your Teeth Cleaning? Follow This Dentist’s Tips to Prevent Cavities



a woman brushing her teeth: Rescheduling Your Teeth Cleaning? Follow This Dentist’s Tips to Prevent Cavities


© Getty Images / PeopleImages
Rescheduling Your Teeth Cleaning? Follow This Dentist’s Tips to Prevent Cavities



a woman brushing her teeth: Rescheduling Your Teeth Cleaning? Follow This Dentist’s Tips to Prevent Cavities


© Getty Images
Rescheduling Your Teeth Cleaning? Follow This Dentist’s Tips to Prevent Cavities

This spring, my routine dental cleaning was cancelled due to the ongoing pandemic. It was a necessary and recommended appointment change, but it did leave me wondering if I should be caring for my teeth any differently in order to prevent cavities before my rescheduled appointment.

After all, I’ve also had to push appointments in the past due to calendar conflicts, and I actually ended up with some sensitivity and a cavity by the time I got into the dentist’s chair. It wasn’t great.

According to Sophya Morghem, DMD, MS, a general dentist at Sunset Dentistry in San Francisco, a few changes should be made in order to keep your gums and teeth healthy before meeting with your dentist.

First, if you’re hesitant to go to the dentist due to health and safety concerns, Dr. Morghem recommends patients ask all the questions needed in order to feel safe coming into the office. You’ll also want to follow any personalized advice and health protocols recommended by your doctor and/or dentist.

However, if you do need to reschedule (or have already rescheduled), you might need to amp up your brushing and flossing routines. For example, Dr. Morghem recommends brushing after each meal.

Flossing is nonnegotiable, too. “The best time to floss is before bed, or after the last meal of the day,” Dr. Morghem told POPSUGAR. And you’ll want to pay attention to the type of floss you’re using, too.

“You’ll want to use a thick woven floss that will act like a loofa, cleaning the sides of the teeth as you go,” Dr. Morghem said. “If you are prone to getting food stuck between your teeth after meals, you should consider flossing after meals as well.”

This might be the time to reevaluate what type of toothbrush you’re using as well. Dr. Morghem recommends a small electric toothbrush with a small toothbrush head. “This will make your tooth brushing at home more efficient and clean off more plaque. It also helps to compensate for poor brushing habits.”

Gallery: Here’s What Happens When You Only Brush Your Teeth Once a Day (Best Life)

A water flosser isn’t an essential, but Dr. Morghem said that if you have dental restorations, you might want to consider investing in the tool. However, she made it clear that using a water flosser doesn’t take the place of traditional floss.

“While the water flosser can help eliminate large debris, the traditional floss is still the gold standard for removing plaque that is attached to the tooth surface.”

For mouthwash, Dr. Morghem recommends an alcohol-free version so it won’t disrupt oral flora. “Remember there are good and bad bacteria in your mouth – you want to maintain a healthy balance.”

It might also be a good idea to just be mindful of foods that typically cause dental

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Mexico will not follow FDA in approving Gilead’s COVID-19 drug

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – Mexico will not necessarily follow the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in approving Gilead Science Inc’s antiviral drug remdesivir for use in COVID-19 patients, a top Mexican health official said on Friday.

Mexico’s health regulator Cofepris has already twice denied approval for the drug with a “non-favorable” opinion, deputy health minister Hugo Lopez-Gatell told his regular nightly news conference.

“We have no mandate from the FDA,” he said. “Cofepris has identified that the evidence does not suggest a usefulness, a sufficient efficacy.”

The FDA approved remdesivir on Thursday, making it the first and only drug approved for the disease in the United States.

Remdesivir, given intravenously, was one of the drugs used to treat U.S. President Donald Trump during his bout with COVID-19.

The World Health Organization’s (WHO) Solidarity drug trial last week concluded remdesivir has little or no impact on a patient’s chances of surviving COVID-19, and a top WHO scientist on Friday recommended the FDA consider all available evidence.

Lopez-Gatell said Gilead had sent a letter to doctors in Mexico refuting the results of the Solidarity trial, and that officials were looking to see if the letter could be cause for sanction, given that remdesivir is not registered with Mexican health authorities.

“It confuses the population and generates a false expectation of the possibility of having a treatment option,” he said.

Gilead did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

(Reporting by Sharay Angulo and Daina Beth Solomon; Editing by Sonya Hepinstall and Tom Hogue)

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