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medicine

Past pandemics, roots of modern medicine focus of historical novel by Jacobs School professor emeritus – UB Now: News and views for UB faculty and staff

Hard as it may be to believe, there was a time in the not-so-distant past when the idea of living through a global pandemic was inconceivable to most of us.

The COVID-19 crisis changed all that. As medical experts and scientists scramble to find treatments and develop a vaccine, it leads us to wonder: How did doctors deal with a community health crisis in earlier times, without the medical advancements and technologies available to researchers in the 21st century?

A retired professor from the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at UB has written a book that addresses many of those questions.

In his history-based novel, “Bloodletting and Germs: A Doctor in Nineteenth Century Rural New York” (BookBaby), Thomas C. Rosenthal tells the story of Jabez Allen, a country doctor who worked in East Aurora during the 1800s.

The book describes the evolution of medical practices in the 19th century through the eyes of Allen, whose life and experiences Rosenthal painstakingly researched and recreated. It explains how Allen’s medical practice developed during a period of enormous social and scientific change that included the Civil War and the cholera epidemic of the mid-1800s.

Rosenthal knows something about the practice of rural medicine. A 1975 graduate of the Jacobs School, he chaired the Department of Family Medicine from 1994 until his retirement in 2013. During his tenure, Rosenthal was instrumental in establishing the Division of Rural Health, the medical school’s rural health campus in Cuba, N.Y., and its groundbreaking residency program in rural health.

Due to his efforts, UB was named a New York Rural Health Research Center in 1992, and in 1993 became one of only five universities in the country designated as a national rural health research center.

Rosenthal’s interest in rural health came from the eight years he worked as a family doctor in the small, Western New York farming community of Perry. He established the practice in 1978 after completing a family medicine residency at the former Deaconess Hospital in Buffalo. In 1986, he became medical director of Buffalo General Medical Center’s Department of Family Medicine. Rosenthal was named director of UB’s family medicine residency in 1987, and executive director of UB’s rural health programs in 1988.

Rosenthal first came across the story of Jabez Allen on a visit to the East Aurora Historical Society, where he discovered an intriguing artifact: a handwritten copy of a medical school diploma belonging to Allen, alongside the official document.

‘Why would a doctor need to make a copy of his diploma?’ he wondered. As it turns out, Allen was reluctant to send out his diploma to the Erie County Medical Board for fear of losing it. Instead, he sent them his copy.

“Allen practiced in East Aurora from 1834 to 1884, making him the perfect protagonist for a book on 19th-century family medicine,” Rosenthal says.

“The century is often referred to as a period of medical enlightenment,” he explains. “In retirement, I indulged myself in the question, ‘Why did it

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medicine

Conning is Proud to Announce its Newest Focus Series-Commercial Automobile Insurance-Medicine for an Ailing Patient

HARTFORD, Conn., Nov. 16, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Commercial automobile insurance results have been troubled for over a decade. With a combined ratio averaging 107% since 2010 and underwriting losses more than $20 billion, commercial auto is the poorest-performing commercial insurance line.

The Conning Focus Series, “Commercial Automobile Insurance–Medicine for an Ailing Patient” analyzes drivers of commercial auto’s continued underperformance and presents solutions to restore the line to health. The analysis identifies and explores root causes of commercial auto’s underperformance, some of which are underappreciated or overlooked.  Because the causes of the line’s poor results are multi-faceted, the road to recovery must be pursued on multiple fronts.

“The main tool commercial auto insurers deploy to improve results is increasing rates. Rate increases alone are not enough to get ahead of loss costs, which are often driven by liability claim inflation,” said Jerry Theodorou, a Director, Insurance Research at Conning.

“Insurers must recognize practices that inflate claims, call them out, and deal with them. Insurers that understand and address the root causes of claim inflation will be the first to get their commercial auto portfolios back to profitability,” added Steve Webersen, Head of Insurance Research.

Commercial Automobile Insurance–Medicine for an Ailing Patient” is available for purchase from Conning by calling (888) 707-1177 or by visiting www.conningresearch.com.

ABOUT CONNING
Conning (www.conning.com) is a leading investment management firm with a long history of serving the insurance industry. Conning supports institutional investors, including pension plans, with investment solutions and asset management offerings, risk modeling software, and industry research. Founded in 1912, Conning has investment centers in Asia, Europe and North America.

Media Contacts

Becky Humphrey      
Conning
860-299-2341
[email protected]

[c: 11373889] 

SOURCE Conning, Inc.

Related Links

http://www.conning.com

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medicine

Lucrative Opportunities with the Growing Focus on Personalized Medicine

Dublin, Nov. 09, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The “North America Microtome Market to 2027 – Country Analysis and Forecasts by Product (Microtome Instruments, Microtome Accessories); Technology (Manual Microtomes, Semi-automated Microtomes, Fully Automated Microtomes); End User (Hospitals, Clinical Laboratories, Other End Users)” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

The North America microtome market is expected to reach US$ 94,198.6 thousand in 2027 from US$ 59,961.2 thousand in 2019. The market is expected to grow with a CAGR of 6.0% from 2020-2027.

The growth of the North America microtome market is estimated to grow due to critical factors such as the rising prevalence of cancer, and increasing adoption of digital pathology is expected to propel the growth of the market. Yet, the lack of skilled professionals is one of the major factors hindering the market growth.

Digital diagnosis has become a crucial aspect of the lab for surgical pathology. Nowadays, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) slides are digitally scanned into high-resolution digital images. These are then viewed, analyzed, and shared with other pathologists for better diagnostic results.

With the global figure of new cancer cases anticipated to rise, pathology laboratories are studying for ways to meet the increased demand for their services. This has directed to the increasing adoption of digital pathology that allows laboratories to work more efficiently. Digitalization in pathology labs has been increasing witnessed in the US and other developed countries over the last few years.

Many countries have started adopting the digital pathology framework, which in turn offering lucrative opportunities for the growth of the market. For instance, Sectra received a 510(k) approval by the US FDA. The clearance implements for the Sectra Digital Pathology Module. Permission allows US healthcare providers to use Sectra’s digital pathology solution for primary diagnostics. The purpose of digital pathology technology is expected to help pathologists in diagnosing clinical histology cases digitally to enhance laboratory efficiency and quality. Thus, increasing the adoption of digital pathology drives the growth of the North America microtome market in the forecast period.

North America microtome market, based on the product, was segmented into microtome instrument and microtome accessories. In 2019, the microtome instrument segment held the highest share of the market. Furthermore, the corresponding segment is expected to grow at the fastest rate during the upcoming years.

Based on technology, the North America microtome market was segmented into fully automated microtomes, semi-automated microtomes, and manual microtomes. In 2019, a fully automated microtomes segment held the largest share of the market. Further, the same segment is anticipated to grow at the fastest rate during the forecasted period.

Based on end user, the North America microtome market was segmented into clinical laboratories, hospital, and other end users (pharma biotech, academic research, agriculture). In 2019, the clinical laboratories segment held the largest share of the market. Besides, the same segment is expected to grow at the fastest rate during the coming year.

Key Topics Covered:

1. Introduction
1.1 Scope of the Study
1.2 Research Report Guidance
1.3 Market Segmentation

2. North

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medicine

Medicine Hat school boards continue to focus on mental health

Local school boards came together this week to discuss mental health and the suicide crisis in Medicine Hat.

This was the second virtual meeting in the last month that was held for parents and caregivers. The event was hosted by school division psychologists Claire Petersen and Greg Godard.

“I think it went really well,” Petersen said of Wednesday evening’s meeting. “We were able to address some different topics than the first meeting we had.

“This has been a wonderful opportunity to collaborate with other divisions to have these really important conversations.”

The first event, which was held last month, was hosted by trauma expert Kevin Cameron. More than 600 tuned in live to hear their questions answered.

Wednesday’s event answered questions submitted by parents that were not answered last month.

“Parents sent in some amazing, thoughtful and really brave questions – we just couldn’t get to them all,” said Petersen. “We took the ones we couldn’t get to and grouped them together by theme.

“This week we talked about self-harm, talking with other adults about suicide, the stigma and mental health, accessing support and then we talked about building resilience.”

Petersen says the focus now is to keep the conversation going with school-based mental health professionals in the region.

“We’ve been sharing our contact information, but over the next week or so parents will see a series of videos start to come out that introduces these professionals,” she said. “We want to continue that conversation on a more individual level.

“We know there may be some specific questions people have asked that we may not have answered, so we want people to know that we are here. The video series will help families put names to faces.”

Each division is going to gather information and determine what ways it should continue to address mental health conversations and how to keep them going.

“We’ll follow up with people with more intimate conversations on a school level,” she said.

Petersen says the school year has been busier for psychologists and mental health workers than ever.

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“There’s multiple reasons it’s been so busy,” she said. “I think mental health concerns, along with COVID-19 and planning, and just trying to have a way for everyone to learn.

“Everyone is working so hard and we’re ensuring that we’re there for students and staff when they need us.”

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medicine

WISH panel discussion to focus on future of precision medicine

Experts from Qatar and abroad will come together on November 15, at 5pm, to participate in a virtual panel discussion titled, “Precision medicine – One Size Doesn’t Fit All”, held as part of the fully virtual World Innovation Summit for Health (WISH) 2020, a component of Qatar Foundation’s mission to foster evidence-based ideas and practices in healthcare.
Taking place from 5-6pm, Doha time, the panel discussion will be accompanied by the launch of a report by the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU), titled “Doing Well? Fulfilling the Promise of Precision Medicine”. In the report, which is sponsored by Qatar Foundation (QF), EIU discusses the promise of precision medicine; what it is currently delivering; and challenges associated with its wider application in large health systems.
“I think people are now beginning to realise that different groups react very differently, and that’s got to do, to a large degree, with their genetic makeup, which in turn determines how good they are defending themselves against a particular disease,” says, Dr Richard O’Kennedy, vice president, QF Research, Development, and Innovation.
“Through the tremendous research that is ongoing at Qatar Foundation, we are keen on developing the best healthcare possible for our citizens, residents, and the broader world. We are very lucky to have the support for our work in the area of precision medicine. The leadership of Qatar recognise the value of this.”
Over the last decade, the term precision medicine has become a buzzword. It has been the subject of intensive research efforts which has allowed scientists to find some answers but inevitably it has also paved the way for many more questions. Its promising potential to transform the way existing health systems work to become more patient-centric has spread a ripple of excitement throughout healthcare systems.
Despite the mostly positive initial response to its obvious potential, the actual task of delivering precision medicine will not be an easy one.
Health systems are resistant to change, and the nature of precision medicine will require considerable changes in terms of processes, education and infrastructure, which will be no small challenge.
To discuss these challenges and possible solutions, the panel discussion will bring together Dr Victor Dzau – president of the US National Academy of Medicine, Dr Said Ismail – director, Qatar Genome Programme, Dr Walid Qoronfleh – director, Healthcare Research and Policy at WISH, Dr Lotfi Chouchane – professor at Weill Cornell Medicine, and David Humphreys – global head of Health Policy for The Economist Intelligence Unit Healthcare Practice.
The discussion – moderated by Al Jazeera journalist Rawaa Auge – will look at challenges surrounding the integration of precision medicine into existing healthcare systems and possible solutions, while also discussing the panel’s views on how to advance precision medicine initiatives in Qatar and internationally.
The hour-long session will also be used to launch a WISH policy briefing report on precision medicine titled, “The Future of Medicine: Healthcare Innovation through Innovation”. The WISH report takes a Qatar-centric look at developments around the topic under discussion.

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medicine

Editas’ (EDIT) Earnings Rise Y/Y in Q3, EDIT-101 in Focus

Editas Medicine, Inc. EDIT delivered earnings of 12 cents per share in the third quarter of 2020, reversing the year-ago quarter’s loss of 66 cents. The Zacks Consensus Estimate was of a loss of 66 cents per share.

Collaboration, and other research and development revenues comprising the company’s top line came in at $62.8 million in the reported quarter, substantially up from the year-ago quarter’s $4 million. The top line also comprehensively beat the Zacks Consensus Estimate of $7 million.

On the third-quarter conference call, management stated that the surge in revenues was owing to recognition of the remaining deferred revenue as a result of terminating the Allergan collaboration.

We note that in August 2020, Editas terminated its 2017 agreement with Allergan [now part of AbbVie ABBV and regained the full global rights to develop, manufacture and commercialize its ocular medicines including the lead pipeline candidate EDIT-101.

In the third quarter, research and development expenses were $33.9 million, up 49.3% from the year-ago figure due to increased expenses related to the development of EDIT-101. General and administrative expenses increased 26.7% to $19.9 million owing to higher professional service expenses and personnel costs.

Shares of Editas were up 3% in after-hours trading following the earnings release on Thursday. In fact, the stock has rallied 6.6% in the year so far against the industry’s decrease of 1.1%.

Pipeline & Other Updates

Editas has no approved product in its portfolio at the moment. Therefore, its pipeline development remains in key focus for the company.

EDIT-101, which uses CRISPR gene editing technology, is being developed for treating Leber congenital amaurosis type 10 (LCA10), a rare genetic illness that causes blindness.

The company completed dosing the first cohort of the phase I/II BRILLIANCE study, which is evaluating EDIT-101 for LCA10.

Meanwhile, Editas initiated its investigational new drug (IND)-enabling activities for EDIT-301, an experimental CRISPR medicine, developed to treat sickle cell disease (SCD) and beta-thalassemia by editing the beta-globin locus. It plans to file the IND for EDIT-301 in the fourth quarter of 2020 for the SCD indication. The FDA granted Rare Pediatric Disease (RPD) designation to EDIT-301 for SCD in August 2020.

Editas Medicine, Inc. Price, Consensus and EPS Surprise

Editas Medicine, Inc. Price, Consensus and EPS Surprise

Editas Medicine, Inc. price-consensus-eps-surprise-chart | Editas Medicine, Inc. Quote

Zacks Rank & Stocks to Consider

Editas currently carries a Zacks Rank #3 (Hold). Better-ranked stocks in the biotech sector include Fulcrum Therapeutics, Inc. FULC and Halozyme Therapeutics, Inc. HALO, both carrying a Zacks Rank #2 (Buy) at present. You can see the complete list of today’s Zacks #1 Rank (Strong Buy) stocks here.

Fulcrum Therapeutics’ loss per share estimates have narrowed 1.1% for 2020 and 0.9% for 2021 over the past 60 days.

Halozyme’s earnings estimates have been revised 19.7% and 13.7% upward for 2020 and 2021 each over the past 60 days. The stock has rallied 85.7% year to date.

5 Stocks Set to Double

Each was hand-picked by a Zacks expert as the #1 favorite stock to gain +100% or more in

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medicine

Global Personalized Medicine Markets Report 2020: Focus on Scientific Basis & Technologies and Markets & Companies

The “Personalized Medicine – Scientific & Commercial Aspects” report from Jain PharmaBiotech has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

The concept of personalized medicine described in this report remains the best way to integrate new technologies such as nanobiotechnology for improving healthcare.

Increase in efficacy and safety of treatment by individualizing it has benefits in financial terms. Information is presented to show that personalized medicine will be cost-effective in healthcare systems. For the pharmaceutical companies, segmentation of the market may not leave room for conventional blockbusters but smaller and exclusive markets for personalized medicines would be profitable. Marketing opportunities for such a system are described with market estimates from 2019-2029.

Profiles of 298 companies involved in developing technologies for personalized medicines, along with 583 collaborations are included.

The aim of personalized medicine or individualized treatment is to match the right drug to the right patient and, in some cases, even to design the appropriate treatment for a patient according to his/her genotype. This report describes the latest concepts of development of personalized medicine based on pharmacogenomics, pharmacogenetics,pharmacoproteomics, and metabolomics.

Basic technologies of molecular diagnostics play an important role, particularly those for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping. Biomarkers play an important role in personalized medicine. Diagnosis is integrated with therapy for selection of treatment as well for monitoring the results. There is emphasis on early detection and prevention of disease in modern medicine. Biochip/microarray technologies and next generation sequencing are also important.

Pharmacogenetics, the study of influence of genetic factors on drug action and metabolism, is used for predicting adverse reactions of drugs. Several enzymes are involved in drug metabolism of which the most important ones are those belonging to the family of cytochrome P450. The knowledge of the effects of polymorphisms of genes for the enzymes is applied in drug discovery and development as well as in clinical use of drugs. Cost-effective methods for genotyping are being developed and it would be desirable to include this information in the patient’s record for the guidance of the physician to individualize the treatment.

Pharmacogenomics, a term that overlaps with pharmacogenetics but is distinct, deals with the application of genomics to drug discovery and development. It involves the mechanism of action of drugs on cells as revealed by gene expression patterns. Pharmacoproteomics is an important contribution to personalized medicine as it is a more functional representation of patient-to-patient variation than that provided by genotyping.A ‘pharmacometabonomic’ approach to personalizing drug treatment is also described.

Biological therapies such as those which use patient’s own cells are considered to be personalized medicines. Vaccines are prepared from individual patient’s tumor cells. Individualized therapeutic strategies using monoclonal bodies can be directed at specific genetic and immunologic targets. Ex vivo gene therapy involves the genetic modification of the patient’s cells in vitro, prior to reimplantation of these cells in the patient’s body.

Various technologies are integrated to develop personalized therapies for specific therapeutic areas described in the report. Examples of this are genotyping for drug resistance in HIV

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medicine

Europe Microtome Market to 2027: Market Opportunities with Growing Focus on Personalized Medicine

DUBLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Nov 2, 2020–

The “Europe Microtome Market to 2027 – Country Analysis and Forecasts by Product (Microtome Instruments, Microtome Accessories); Technology (Manual Microtomes, Semi-automated Microtomes, Fully Automated Microtomes); End User (Hospitals, Clinical Laboratories, Other End Users)” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

Europe microtome market is expected to reach US$ 58,738.7 thousand in 2027 from US$ 38,985.9 thousand in 2019. The market is predicted to grow with a CAGR of 5.4% from 2020-2027.

The growth of the Europe microtome market is estimated to grow due to critical factors such as the rising prevalence of cancer, and increasing adoption of digital pathology is expected to propel the growth of the market. Yet, the lack of skilled professionals is one of the major factors hindering the market growth.

Digital diagnosis has become a crucial aspect of the lab for surgical pathology. Nowadays, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) slides are digitally scanned into high-resolution digital images. These are then viewed, analyzed, and shared with other pathologists for better diagnostic results. With the global number of new cancer cases expected to rise, pathology laboratories are looking for ways to meet the increased demand for their services.

This has directed to the increasing adoption of digital pathology that allows laboratories to work more efficiently. Digitalization in pathology labs has been increasing witnessed in the US and other developed countries over the last few years. Increasing technological advancements in digital pathology are further accelerating the growth of the market for microtomes. For instance, Tissue-Tek Auto Section automated microtome from Sakura Finetek offers the advantage of automation over manual microtomes.

Moreover, increasing the volume of routine tissue examinations is also increasing the demand for auto mated microtomes in the forecast period. To handle such a large sample size automated microtomes offer numerous benefits to pathologies such as high speed, improved efficiency, and reduces strain.

With the dawn of digitalization, the healthcare sector has undergone significant changes. Rising prevalence of chronic conditions is leading to clinical urgency, thereby increasing the adoption of digital pathology to improve existing inferior diagnostic methods. Clinical laboratories have been widely using microtome for diagnosis purposes. Thus, increasing the adoption of digital pathology drives the growth of the Europe microtome market in the forecast period.

Europe microtome market, based on the product, was segmented into microtome instrument and microtome accessories. In 2019, the microtome instrument segment held the highest share of the market. Furthermore, the corresponding segment is expected to grow at the fastest rate during the upcoming years.

Based on technology, the Europe microtome market was segmented into fully automated microtomes, semi-automated microtomes, and manual microtomes. In 2019, a fully automated microtomes segment held the largest share of the market. Further, the same segment is anticipated to grow at the fastest rate during the forecasted period.

Based on end user, the Europe microtome market was segmented into clinical laboratories, hospital, and other end users (pharma biotech, academic research, agriculture). In 2019, the clinical laboratories segment held the largest share of the market. Besides,

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health

Russia’s COVID-19 vaccine trial slows as focus shifts to second dose

By Polina Ivanova and Gleb Stolyarov

MOSCOW (Reuters) – Russia has temporarily paused the vaccination of new volunteers in its COVID-19 vaccine trial, staff at eight of 25 trial clinics said, with some citing high demand and a shortage of doses.

However, the vaccine’s developer said the uptake of new participants had only slowed.

At eight of the 25 Moscow clinics hosting the trial and inoculating volunteers, staff told Reuters the vaccination of new participants was temporarily on hold, and several said they had used up the doses allocated to their clinics, referencing a large influx of volunteers.

At three of the Moscow clinics running the trial, staff said they had run out specifically of the first component of the two-dose jab. The second component is injected 21 days after the first.

“Vaccination is temporarily suspended. We are only injecting the second component,” a staff member at Moscow Clinic #109 told Reuters, adding the first component ran out around a week ago.

The director of the Gamaleya Institute, which developed and is manufacturing the vaccine, said the decision to slow the uptake of new volunteers was due to a new focus on giving those already vaccinated a second dose, the RIA news agency reported.

“Everything is on track. It’s simply that the gap between (the number of people inoculated with) the first and second dose is quite significant,” Alexander Gintsburg was cited by RIA as saying. He said the total number of daily inoculations had not changed, the Interfax news agency reported.

‘COLOSSAL DEMAND’

Gintsburg said 20,000 volunteers had received the first shot so far and 9,000 the second. The need to now reduce the number of people receiving the first component was due to the capacity of the clinics hosting the trial.

“It’s related to the fact that there’s colossal demand for the vaccine and they are not producing enough to keep up,” said a representative of Crocus Medical, the contract research organisation helping oversee the trial in Moscow together with Russia’s health ministry. The person did not give his name.

According to provisional information, vaccinations will restart by around Nov. 10, he said. A re-start of first dose vaccinationsaround this time was also mentioned at two of the eight clinics contacted by Reuters.

“Try again next week!” prospective volunteers were told at a vaccination trial centre in Moscow’s Chertanovo district, a Reuters reporter heard staff announce on Tuesday.

Crocus Medical’s director Alexei Butylin denied that the trial had been paused. “The trial continues, and there are enough supplies of vaccine.”

Russian officials and vaccine developers have previously flagged challenges in ramping up output of the vaccine, known as Sputnik V, and initial estimates of 30 million doses to be produced by year-end were revised down earlier this month by the industry minister to just over 2 million doses.

Earlier on Thursday, President Vladimir Putin said Russia was facing challenges scaling up production of the vaccine due to problems with equipment availability, but hoped to start mass

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