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Halifax law firm preps for potential class-action against dentist accused of misconduct

A Halifax law firm is preparing to potentially file a class-action lawsuit against a prominent Halifax-area dentist whose licence was suspended this week after several allegations of misconduct.



a man smiling for the camera: The Provincial Dental Board of Nova Scotia has announced that they have suspended Dr. Errol Gaum's dental license indefinitely, effective immediately.


© Granville Dental
The Provincial Dental Board of Nova Scotia has announced that they have suspended Dr. Errol Gaum’s dental license indefinitely, effective immediately.

Halifax law firm preps for potential class-action against dentist accused of misconduct

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MacGillivary Law is accepting stories from former or current patients of Dr. Errol Gaum, a dentist at the Granville Dental clinic in Bedford, N.S.

Misconduct allegations mount against Bedford dentist

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“We’re here to listen to what people have to say and we’re here to help assess any potential claims that they may have,” said Angeli Swinamer, a partner at the firm, in an interview.

More than 150 people have expressed interest in being part of the potential lawsuit to date, she added.

Read more: Bedford, N.S. dentist’s licence suspended following numerous misconduct allegations

The news comes the same day as a number of Gaum’s former patients held a protest in Bedford, outside his most recent place of employment.

“I thought I was going crazy because at the time, no one was listening to me,” said Mary MacDonald, who was treated by Gaum for 13 years, and attended the rally Saturday .

“It’s because of him I’m scared to go to a dentist today. I haven’t been to a dentist since I left him in 1988.”

MacDonald alleged Gaum did not wait for freezing to kick in before beginning an operation on her gums and told her if she kept crying, the freezing “wouldn’t work” and he would have to start over.

She said she would consider joining a class action lawsuit “not for the money,” but to ensure no one else suffers similar treatment.

READ MORE: Parents accuse Bedford, N.S. dentist of malpractice, call for licence to be revoked

At the protest, many told Global News they suffered in silence for years, believing they were alone.

“I didn’t tell (my mother) until years later, because I thought I was bad, and I got a slap for being a bad girl for not opening,” said Christine Shupe, who was treated by Gaum at the age of five.

“It left me with a lot of anxiety over the years and trust issues towards men.”

Misconduct allegations mount against Bedford dentist

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Marcia Olsen, another former patient, said Gaum’s rough treatment left bruising on her face and neck as a child.

He or his staff, she added, then threatened to blame it on her mother’s daycare business if she complained to the provincial dental board.

None of the allegations have been proven in court.

Read more: Parents accuse Bedford, N.S., dentist of malpractice, call for licence to be revoked

The youngest protester on Saturday was just seven years old.

“He told me to shut up and he put his hand on my mouth,” said Azaryiah

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dentist

Halifax law firm preps for potential class-action against dentist accused of misconduct – Halifax

A Halifax law firm is preparing to potentially file a class-action lawsuit against a prominent Halifax-area dentist who has had his licence suspended after several allegations of misconduct.

McGillivary Law has begun to accept stories from former or current patients of Dr. Errol Gaum, a dentist at Granville Dental in Bedford, N.S.

“If you are inquiring about our pending class action in relation to Dr. Errol Gaum please complete this form and submit. We will be in touch within 48 hours,” a form on the law firm’s website reads.

The firm did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Read more:
Bedford, N.S. dentist’s licence suspended following numerous misconduct allegations

The news of a potential lawsuit comes the same day as a planned protest at the Granville Dental clinic on Saturday.

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The goal, according to a Facebook event for the Broken Trust Protest, is to raise awareness for the “victims of Dr.Errold Gaum.”

Several patients and former patients came forward to accuse Gaum of professional malpractice by using excessive force on children in his dentist chair.

One account was from Ryan Binder, a parent from Glace Bay, N.S., whose six-year-old daughter was referred to Granville Dental to get a tooth removed.

Binder claimed Gaum “wasn’t letting his daughter breathe” because he was holding her nose during the treatment. He also claimed Gaum told his daughter to “shut up” during the appointment.


Click to play video 'Quispamsis calls for change as police officer in misconduct hearing retires'



Quispamsis calls for change as police officer in misconduct hearing retires


Quispamsis calls for change as police officer in misconduct hearing retires – Oct 28, 2020

Gaum’s licence to practice dentistry in Nova Scotia was suspended indefinitely this week by the Provincial Dental Board of Nova Scotia.

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Dr. Curtis Gregoire, the deputy registrar of the Provincial Dental Board of Nova Scotia, told Global News in a statement on Thursday that the decision came after the board’s complaints committee held an emergency meeting to consider a number of complaints against Guam.

After reviewing the complaints, Gaum’s license was suspended.

On Saturday, Dr. Don Moors, speaking on behalf of the dental board, said the investigation remains ongoing but that they could not provide specific details on the investigation in order to protect patient confidentiality.

Halifax Regional Police have also confirmed to Global News that they’ve received at least four complaints about a man who was working as a dentist at 1083 Bedford Hwy. in Bedford.

They are investigating the complaints, Const. John MacLeod, a spokesperson for the police force said. No charges have been laid.

Read more:
Parents accuse Bedford, N.S., dentist of malpractice, call for licence to be revoked

Dr. Gaum’s attorney Joel Pink has declined repeated attempts for an interview, only saying Dr. Gaum will not be commenting until the Provincial Dental Board of

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fitness

New Army recruits will be put through their paces by Bear Grylls’ bootcamp fitness firm BMF

New Army recruits will be put through their paces by Bear Grylls’ bootcamp fitness firm BMF in bid to stop so many dropping out when gruelling training starts

  • Grylls’ company Be Military Fit is partnering with Army recruiter Capita 
  • The adventurer hopes an intense programme will prepare troops for training
  • About 100,000 people apply to join the Army each year quit because of the rigorous fitness demands and outdoor skills required 

Bear Grylls will help toughen up new recruits from next week in a bid to stop them dropping out of the Army. 

Thousands of the around 100,000 people who apply to join the Army each year quit because of the rigorous fitness demands and outdoor skills required.

But the TV survival star’s bootcamp fitness company is stepping in to help put recruits through their paces before their official training begins. 

Be Military Fit (BMF) is set to launch a new partnership with Army recruitment contractor Capita on Monday. 

TV adventurer and former SAS man Bear Grylls is helping whip Army recruits into shape before their training begins. Pictured: Grylls takes part in a workout organised by his fitness bootcamp company Be Military Fit in London in 2019 [File photo]

TV adventurer and former SAS man Bear Grylls is helping whip Army recruits into shape before their training begins. Pictured: Grylls takes part in a workout organised by his fitness bootcamp company Be Military Fit in London in 2019 [File photo]

Pictured: Grylls (centre) with two BMF trainers. The company will launch a new partnership with Army recruitment contractor Capita on Monday with the aim of making sure recruits are fit enough to begin the army's rigorous training programme

Pictured: Grylls (centre) with two BMF trainers. The company will launch a new partnership with Army recruitment contractor Capita on Monday with the aim of making sure recruits are fit enough to begin the army’s rigorous training programme 

The former SAS man told The Sun that his firm will use ‘tailored fitness programmes and expertise’ to condition new recruits in order to stop so many dropping out.

‘The truth is some recruits aren’t prepared for the standard of outdoor resilience and fitness that’s needed to succeed. 

‘Around 30,000 men and women are put through to day one of basic training but they lose a lot in the early days,’ he said.

Grylls is also keen to ensure that more women recruits make it through basic training [File photo]

Grylls, 46, said the programme will get squaddies used to outdoor training and taking instructions as part of a team as well as giving the recruits confidence ahead of their training.

Those who attend all 15 BMF sessions will be issued with a report from one of the company’s instructors. 

Grylls – whose real name is Edward – is also turning his attention to ensuring more women make it through basic training. 

Some 20,000 women apply to join the Army each year but 10% are forced to quit due to the same fitness and resilience issues face by other recruits, The Sun reported.

However, female recruits frequently out-perform their male counterparts. 

Grylls said that women ‘have proven to be some of the most promising and tough recruits we’ve had in the Army in recent years. 

‘They’re just as strong as men, and that’s why we’re going to help get more females fighting fit and

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health

UK govt stands firm on local measures despite virus surge

The British government on Thursday vowed to persist with localised coronavirus restrictions, despite fresh data showing surging numbers of cases and deaths across the country, and new national lockdowns in its European neighbours.

Communities Secretary Robert Jenrick conceded statistics showed Britain was in a “bad place”, with nearly 25,000 new cases registered on Wednesday.

But he indicated that ministers were still opposed to another nationwide lockdown and said targeted action was “the best way forward” given varying rates of infection.

“We will continue with our localised but proportionate approach on taking action where the virus is strongest,” he told Sky News television.

“Despite the fact the virus is rising across the country it is very concentrated in some places nonetheless.”

France announced Wednesday it will begin a new month-long national lockdown while Germany — with lower case rates than Britain — will also roll out drastic new curbs.

The Republic of Ireland shut down again last week, as did Wales, following in the footsteps of Northern Ireland which went into a four-week partial lockdown earlier this month.  

In contrast in England, where health policy is set by the UK government, three tiers of restrictions remain in place depending on local infection rates.

But even the highest “tier three” falls short of ordering people to stay at home.

Figures released on Thursday estimate that about 100,000 people are catching the coronavirus every day.

Cases are doubling every nine days and rising in all age groups and regions, according to the ongoing study by Imperial College London and Ipsos MORI.

The R rate — which indicates the number of people one person with the virus is likely to infect — has risen to 1.6, it said.

Britain is also seeing a sharp increase in virus mortality rates.

Another 310 deaths of people who had tested positive in the prior 28 days were reported Wednesday — the second consecutive day of more than 300 fatalities.

– ‘Nationwide repositioning’ –

Britain is already the hardest hit country in Europe, with more than 45,000 fatalities among those testing positive.

But excess deaths registered during the pandemic suggest the toll could be nearly double that.

The worsening situation is now presenting a serious challenge to Prime Minister Boris Johnson “whack-a-mole” strategy of targeted local action in virus hotspots.

Earlier this year, Johnson was criticised for a slow response to the outbreak, delaying locking down Britain even as the number of positive cases and deaths spiralled across Europe.

He eventually imposed a national lockdown in late March, shutting all non-essential shops and schools, and forcing millions to work from home to cut transmission rates.

The stay-at-home measures were lifted in June as cases dwindled but numbers began to climb again from September.

That month, the government’s top scientific advisers recommended a national “circuit-breaker” lockdown over schools’ half term holidays this week.

But Johnson has so far resisted.

World Health Organisation (WHO) special envoy David Nabarro said Johnson’s localised efforts had been “very effective” at slowing the virus’

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health

Bayer to Buy Gene-Therapy Firm AskBio for Up to $4 Billion

BERLIN—

Bayer AG


BAYRY 0.16%

said Monday it would pay as much as $4 billion for U.S. biotech firm Asklepios BioPharmaceutical Inc. to strengthen the German company’s drugmaking arm, as Bayer continues to reel from its acquisition of crops giant Monsanto.

The latest deal—for which Bayer will pay $2 billion now and as much as a further $2 billion based on future success milestones—is a bet on cutting-edge gene therapy, in which a functional gene is inserted to counter the effects of a disease caused by a missing or faulty gene.

The German company’s biggest pharmaceutical acquisition since its purchase of domestic rival Schering AG in 2006 is also an attempt to tackle one of a series of challenges that has been plaguing the inventor of aspirin, especially since its 2018 acquisition of U.S.-based Monsanto.

The $63 billion Monsanto deal was meant to give the company another big, fast-growing revenue stream besides pharmaceuticals. Instead, it has saddled Bayer with a protracted legal battle over whether Monsanto’s Roundup weedkillers cause cancer—a dispute that has pummeled Bayer’s share price. Bayer says Roundup is safe.

Then, last month, Bayer shocked investors with a warning that the coronavirus pandemic would hit its agriculture business harder than expected. Bayer has also faced setbacks in settling the Roundup lawsuits for $10.9 billion.

The profit warning cast more doubt on the rationale for the Monsanto deal and its ability to boost Bayer’s profit.

At the same time, Bayer’s drug pipeline has been worrying investors. Two of the company’s bestselling drugs—blood thinner Xarelto and eye treatment Eylea—will start to lose patent protection from around 2024.

Analysts have been concerned that Bayer doesn’t have enough promising new products in its research-and-development pipeline to make up for the expected drop in sales from the blockbusters’ patent losses.

To boost its pipeline, Bayer has been looking for drug-development partnerships or deals to license drugs that are in promising stages of clinical development.

Stefan Oelrich, chief executive of Bayer’s pharmaceutical branch, said the purchase of AskBio was slightly larger than the acquisitions Bayer had been seeking in the pharmaceutical space, but added that he was convinced after the first phone call with the U.S. company’s co-founders that it would be the “perfect fit.”

“What we now have is a comprehensive pipeline,” Mr. Oelrich said in an interview. “I feel like things are really coming together on the pharma side.”

Mr. Oelrich said it was too early to predict how much in sales the AskBio treatments are likely to generate, but added that he expects the deal to help Bayer build a leading position in gene therapy. That treatment area has been gaining momentum after setbacks occurred during the first testing in humans in the 1990s, when several patients died.

Dozens of gene therapies are now undergoing clinical trials and big drug companies have been acquiring gene-therapy firms, betting on the success of those treatments in the future.

AskBio was co-founded by Richard Jude Samulski, who pioneered the use of what are known

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