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doTERRA Partners With World Bank in Kenya to Expand Access to Funding for Small-Scale Farmers

Development project will support fisheries and high-value agriculture chains

doTERRA Co-Impact Sourcing in Kenya

doTERRA Co-Impact Sourcing initiatives in Kenya provide smallholder farmers and harvesters with a stable income, regular agricultural training, and improved resources that encourage self-reliance.
doTERRA Co-Impact Sourcing initiatives in Kenya provide smallholder farmers and harvesters with a stable income, regular agricultural training, and improved resources that encourage self-reliance.
doTERRA Co-Impact Sourcing initiatives in Kenya provide smallholder farmers and harvesters with a stable income, regular agricultural training, and improved resources that encourage self-reliance.

PLEASANT GROVE, Utah and NAIROBI, Kenya, Oct. 20, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — doTERRA and its supply chain partners have connected with World Bank to improve access to funding for smallholder farmers in Kenya. The project is part of a broader plan called the Kenya Marine Fisheries and Socio-Economic Development Project (KEMFSED) that will support fisheries value chains, as well as high-value agriculture chains, including essential oil crops, within coastal fishing communities.

“When discussing the success of our farming initiatives in the region with representatives from World Bank, we began to brainstorm ways that we could work together to expand opportunities for even more individuals,” said Taylor MacKay, doTERRA strategic sourcing manager. “World Bank recognized our ability to truly support farmers and local communities through our Co-Impact Sourcing initiatives, and saw doTERRA as an implementation partner that could help them do even more in the region. It has been amazing to see this project take shape from the ground up—from idea generation to recommending other implementing organizations—we’re grateful for the opportunity to participate together in meaningful change.”

The KEMFSED project is slated to run for five years with an overall goal of enhancing livelihoods for individuals involved while safeguarding the integrity of associated ecosystems. If successful, the project has the potential to serve as a model for similar programs around the world.

One of doTERRA’s primary goals in Kenya is the formation of thriving cooperative farming groups within various communities across the region. In addition to providing opportunities for smallholder farmers, doTERRA is committed to supporting development projects improving overall community health and well-being. Learn more about doTERRA Co-Impact Sourcing and community development projects in Kenya.

About doTERRA

dōTERRA® International is an integrative health and wellness company and the world leader in the Global Aromatherapy and Essential Oils market. dōTERRA sources, tests, manufactures and distributes CPTG Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade® essential oils and essential oil products to over eight million dōTERRA Wellness Advocates and customers. Through industry leading responsible sourcing practices, dōTERRA maintains the highest levels of quality, purity and sustainability in partnership with local growers around the world through Cō-Impact Sourcing®. The dōTERRA Healing Hands Foundation®, a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, offers resources and tools to global sourcing communities and charitable organizations for self-reliance, healthcare, education, sanitation, and the fight against human trafficking. Through the life-enhancing benefits of essential oils, dōTERRA is changing the world one drop, one person, one community at a time. To learn more, visit www.doterra.com.

Contact:
Kevin Wilson
[email protected]

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/ddd7b30d-9027-4b91-859d-c3f3652e6ce7

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health

Farmers push ‘veggieburger’ label ban in Europe

Angry European farmers are pushing for a ban on calling vegetarian products a “burger” or a “sausage” that they say mislead consumers into thinking certain products contain meat.

Their demand was part of a legislative proposal on Monday at the European Parliament, which MEPs will vote on later this week in Brussels. 

The ban request comes on the back of the rising success of high-end veggieburgers that closely replicate the taste and sensation of eating meat.

Vegetarianism is also gaining ground due to the link between raising cattle and climate change.

Also banned would be products labelled as “yoghurt-style” or “cheese-like” for non-dairy based products. Terms such as “almond milk” and “vegan cheese” are already banned in the EU.

According to the proposal for an amendment, “terms and descriptions referring to ‘meat’ should be reserved exclusively for the parts of animals fit for human consumption”. 

The draft text lists “steak”, “sausage”, “escalope”, “burger” and “hamburger” as examples of banned words.

The parliament’s agriculture committee proposed the passage as amendments to a vast farming bill that would go to a vote on Tuesday.

Jean-Pierre Fleury, of the EU’s farmers association Copa and Cogeca, called the misuse of meat labels “an obvious case of cultural hijacking.”

“We are about to create a brave new world where marketing is disconnected from the real nature of products, which is just asking for things to spin out of control!” he said earlier this month. 

Food advocacy group ProVeg International said the opposite was true and that the terms “provide important information regarding the taste and uses that people can expect from a product.”

“Just as we all know that peanut butter does not contain butter, consumers know exactly what they are getting when they buy veggie burgers or veggie sausages,” said ProVeg’s Alex Gromminger. 

Voting results should be available no earlier than Wednesday. If the present text is adopted, it would then be negotiated with EU member states as part of a reform to the EU’s agriculture policies.

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