families

medicine

Sidra Medicine highlights importance of mental health in families

Sidra Medicine has reiterated the importance of mental health in families as part of its ongoing commitment to support the development and advancement of mental health services in Qatar.

Dr Felice Watt, division chief, Adult Psychiatry for Women’s Mental Health at Sidra Medicine said, “Mothers are the key to a family’s mental health and we need our mothers to be physically and emotionally well. It is important that pregnant women and mothers feel supported and empowered. We can ask them “How are you feeling?” and “What can I do to help you?” and offer support and company. It is also important to listen without judgment. If you feel that you are unable to support, then help her get professional assistance.”
Mental health not only affects the woman but also impacts the pregnancy, the child and the family. This highlights the importance of fathers’ and infants’ mental health and wellbeing.
Infant Mental Health describes the capacity of a baby to form close relationships; to recognise and express emotions and to explore and learn about their environment. Every interaction contributes to the child’s brain development and lays the foundation for later learning.
To reach their full potential, children need support of their physical and mental health and an environment of nurturing care. This includes responsive caregiving whereby their caregivers notice, understand and respond to the child’s signals in a timely and appropriate manner. Opportunity for early learning is also encouraged.
Fathers also play a unique and important role in their children’s development and in supporting their wife.     
Dr Zainab Imam, psychiatrist from Sidra Medicine said, “According to research featured in the Wiley Online Library, about 10% of new fathers experience depression, especially if their wives are depressed; while up to 18% of fathers suffer from anxiety. Since most new mothers look to their husbands as the main source of support, poor paternal support can worsen a mother’s mental health.”
“We advocate that there needs to be stronger support systems for fathers, encouraging them to be involved, and giving them an opportunity to talk about their experiences as fathers and to learn how to support their children’s development And most importantly, fathers need support to access professional help when needed, without the stigma that sometimes stops many new fathers from seeking help,” continued Dr Imam.
Qatar has set up a helpline (16000) to support people of all ages and nationalities who are looking for advice on coping with stress, anxiety and depression and other mental health disorders. The helpline is available from 8 am to 7pm Sundays to Thursdays, and 8am to 3pm on Saturdays.

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health

As the holidays near, the coronavirus is spreading rapidly, putting families in a quandary

“Covid doesn’t care that it’s a holiday, and unfortunately covid is on the rise across the nation,” she said. “Now is not the time to let our guard down and say it’s the holiday and let’s be merry. I think we need to maintain our vigilance here.”

The coronavirus pandemic numbers have been going the wrong direction for more than a month, topping 80,000 newly confirmed infections daily across the country, with hospitalizations rising in more than three dozen states and deaths creeping upward. Now, the United States is barreling toward another inflection point: a holiday season dictated by the calendar and demanded by tradition.

The anticipated surge in interstate travel, family gatherings and indoor socializing is expected to facilitate the spread of covid-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus. This isn’t like the run-up to Memorial Day or Independence Day: Barbecues outdoors, or pool parties, aren’t on the itinerary of many people.

The fall and winter holidays are homey by nature. Respiratory viruses thrive in dry, warm indoor conditions in which people crowd together. The statistical peak of flu season typically comes close on the heels of Christmas and New Year’s. Colder weather is already driving people indoors.

The government’s top doctors have said they believe the recent national spike in infections has largely been driven by household transmission. Superspreader events have gotten a lot of attention, but it’s the prosaic meals with family and friends that are driving up caseloads.

This trend presents people with difficult individual choices — and those choices carry societal consequences. Epidemiologists look at the broad effect of a contagion, not simply the effects on individuals. Thanksgiving, for example, is an extremely busy travel period in America. The coronavirus exploits travelers to spread in places where it has been sparse or absent.

“I am nervous about Thanksgiving,” said Andrew Noymer, an epidemiologist at the University of California at Irvine. “I’m nervous because I know what happens when you multiply the risks by millions of households.”

The scientists are not telling people to cancel their holiday plans, necessarily. But they are urging people to think of alternative ways to celebrate. They do not say it explicitly, but they are encouraging a kind of rationing of togetherness.

“This is not the cold. This is not the flu. This is much worse. People are dying. Our well-being as a country depends on us getting this thing under control,” Alexander said.

Public-health officials doubt an elegant way exists to finesse the 2020 pandemic-shrouded holidays with minimal disruption — for example, by working through a checklist of best practices that include timely testing, scrupulous social distancing and disciplined mask-wearing. Instead, people will need to make serious adjustments as they calculate the risks and rewards of holiday gatherings.

“There’s no easy answer here, just like with everything else. It’s not about safe or unsafe. It’s about figuring out how to balance various risks and keeping risks as low as possible,” Harvard epidemiologist Julia Marcus said.

“This is not a

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health

Pittman Expands Financial Aid For Coronavirus Patients, Families

MILLERSVILLE, MD — Anne Arundel County Executive Steuart Pittman launched three initiatives Thursday to help locals weather the coronavirus fallout. The programs will help residents pay bills, find resources and cope with virus-related deaths.

Water Shutoffs

The first initiative looks to help struggling families pay their water bills. Pittman announced the relief effort at a press conference in front of a Millersville water tower.

About 20,000 county residents are behind on their water payements, Pittman said. That’s up 19,000 from this time last year, the county executive added.

“If we don’t help these people, they could not only have their water cut off, but the liens that we are required to put on their homes, and the subsequent foreclosure proceedings could leave them homeless,” Pittman said in a press release after the conference. “Helping to pay their bills is essential.”

Pittman recently bought time for these families by signing Executive Order 30. The mandate prohibited water shutoffs for nonpayment until Nov. 16.

The county will mail applications for the Water Bill Relief Program to residents who qualify. Interested applicants may also dial (410) 222-1144 or email [email protected] TTY users should call Maryland Relay at 7-1-1.

Family Resources

Pittman also announced the COVID Care Coordination Program, an extension of the Department of Health’s contract tracing. The program’s case managers will reach out to people who test positive for coronavirus. The bilingual workers can help find food, shelter, housing, commodities and financial assistance.

The final initiative addresses the pandemic’s effects on mental health. This COVID Recovery and Grief Support Program will offer counseling to families who lost a loved one to coronavirus.

The extra money will bolster the mental health warm line, which has answered more calls during the pandemic. Residents can reach the line at (410) 768-5522.

“What we are experiencing is an increase in the number of individuals who are seeking additional mental health support, many of whom have financial barriers,” said Adrienne Mickler, the executive director of the Anne Arundel County Mental Health Agency. “These funds will support urgent care appointments and follow up treatment.”

CARES Act Check-In

Pittman will fund his $2 million plan with money from the Coronavirus, Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, better known as the CARES Act. Anne Arundel County got $101.1 million in CARES Act funding after Congress passed the stimulus package in March.

The county executive’s announcement came hours before Gov. Larry Hogan announced his $250 million plan to keep Maryland’s small businesses afloat. Hogan stressed the importance of spending CARES Act money soon, noting that it expires at the end of the year.

Pittman said that Anne Arundel County has about $25 million to $30 million left in its CARES Act account. Residents can track the county’s coronavirus spending and find resources at this link. The website shows that Anne Arundel has about $52.2 million of CARES Act money remaining, but Pittman noted that the portal needs to be updated with the county’s latest expenditures.

“Water bill

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health

Families sue Pennsylvania nursing home in wake of 73 COVID deaths

The families said staff failed to take proper measures to stem the outbreak.

The families of some of the 73 residents residents who have died from COVID-19 while living at a Pennsylvania nursing home have filed a lawsuit against the facility, accusing it of recklessly handling the virus outbreak.

The families of 10 deceased residents teamed up with the families of five current residents at the Brighton Rehabilitation and Wellness Center in a lawsuit against the nursing home, saying staff failed to take proper measures to stem the outbreak.

“They show clear evidence of poor infection control, poor training, poor supervision, transparency problems, cross-contamination, lack of supplies — it goes on and on,” Bob Daley, one of the attorneys representing the families, said Thursday. “What happened at Brighton was nothing short of a tragedy. … Brighton as an entity systematically failed its residents.”

The lawsuit names Brighton Rehab’s owners and its medical director and accuses leaders of “managerial and operational negligence, carelessness, recklessness and willful and wanton conduct,” according to the complaint. The suit seeks a jury trial and unspecified damages.

PHOTO: Rob Peirce speaks during a news conference about a lawsuit filed against Brighton Rehabilitation and Wellness Center for its response to the Covid-19 outbreaks in the facility in Beaver, Pa., Oct. 21, 2020.

Rob Peirce speaks while surrounded by other lawyers involved and family members of residents during a news conference about a lawsuit filed against Brighton Rehabilitation and Wellness Center for its response to the Covid-19 outbreaks in the facility in Beaver, Pa., Oct. 21, 2020.

Brighton allegedly failed to separate infected residents from the general population, allowed infected workers to continue working and shared misinformation about the outbreak to family members and health officials, according to the suit.

Lawyers for the residents also claimed Brighton was severely understaffed during the pandemic, which forced workers to “cut corners while struggling to care for hundreds of residents during the pandemic,” according to the suit.

In response to the lawsuit, a Brighton spokesperson denied the claims and said the facility followed the guidance of local governmental health officials throughout the pandemic.

“Right now, the facility’s sole focus remains on ensuring the health and well-being of all residents and staff,” the spokesperson said in a statement.

The facility has been

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health

Head Start never stops working for children and families, and neither should Congress

For 55 years, Head Start has stood by America’s children and families. Created as part of the War on Poverty, locally operated Head Start programs have prepared nearly 40 million children from at-risk backgrounds for success in school and life. Today, an unwavering bipartisan commitment from Congress enables Head Start programs across the nation to serve the educational, socio-emotional, health, and nutrition needs of more than 1 million children in safe, nurturing environments.

Fortunately, while COVID-19 has shut down many valuable forces in American life, it hasn’t stopped Head Start. In the months since the COVID-19 pandemic began spreading in the United States, Head Start staff have been working in overdrive to adapt their teaching strategies, sanitize classrooms, make necessary health-related adjustments to facilities, and provide access to quality online and other remote learning opportunities for children and families from at-risk backgrounds ― all while grappling with rising COVID-19 operational costs.

Head Start families are expressing relief that their programs have remained steadfast in their efforts to keep children healthy and prepare them for success in school and life. One Head Start parent in California shared that her program is “incorporating outdoor activity and keeping children on track. They are educating the children about why they cannot visit family and friends. They are supporting parents in managing working from home and helping our children learn at home. Our Head Start program has gone above and beyond in supporting our children.”

This fall, as more Head Start programs are engaged in reopening their classrooms safely, they are confronting the true cost of operating in the COVID-19 era. From PPE for children and staff to increased hours for janitorial staff to additional mental health services for children coping with this new trauma, Head Start programs are facing a funding shortfall that will soon impact the children and families they are supporting in navigating this crisis.

Since the start of COVID-19, Head Start programs have pivoted in countless innovative ways: conducting online classrooms, donning PPE and making home visits to check on children, erecting elaborate screening barriers and devising creative bus routes, arranging contactless health screenings and food drops — doing everything physically and financially possible to ensure children and families living on the margins aren’t pushed further to the edge. Head Start never stopped working.

That’s why Congress and the administration must not stop, either. They can start by making sure Head Start programs have the critical resources necessary to reopen classrooms safely. Based on extensive surveying of Head Start providers, the National Head Start Association estimates operational costs will increase by up to 20 percent this year as individual programs adapt and respond to the pandemic. That’s why the Head Start community has been advocating to Congress for at least $1.7 billion in emergency funding to keep up with COVID-19-related costs — PPE for teachers, IT upgrades to support virtual learning, facility adaptations, additional staff hours to meet smaller classroom ratios for social distancing, and many other needs.

Lack of emergency

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