facing

fitness

De Gea facing fitness check after coming off injured in Man Utd’s win at Southampton

Dean Henderson was subbed on to make his Premier League debut for the Red Devils at St Mary’s

David de Gea is an injury worry for Manchester United, with manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer admitting the goalkeeper will be assessed by the club’s medical team after coming off injured against Southampton.

The Spain international did not come out for the second half – being replaced by Dean Henderson – after appearing to damage his knee when beaten for a second time at St Mary’s on Sunday.

De Gea dived to his right in a bid to keep out James Ward-Prowse’s free kick, but failed to make the save and collided with the post.

Henderson was seen going through a rigorous warm-up at half-time, and was subbed on for his Premier League debut for the club.

Goal 50 Revealed: The best 50 players in the world

Following the game, Solskjaer spoke to Sky Sports about De Gea’s injury and said he is unsure if he will be fit to face Paris Saint-Germain in the UEFA Champions League on Wednesday evening.

“Let’s have a little check on him (David de Gea),” Solskjaer said . “Hopefully he can be okay for Wednesday but I’m not sure.”

While United trailed 2-0 at the break, they produced a thrilling fightback and thanks to a goal from Bruno Fernandes and brace from Edinson Cavani were able to secure a 3-2 win.

United dominated after the interval, meaning Henderson’s Premier League bow for the club was not overly taxing, but Solskjaer felt the 23-year-old was polished in what he did.

“Dean played well though,” the Norwegian said. “He’s a keeper who has been used to being vocal. He wants to organise the team. 

“He had a couple of tidy saves to make. He was safe with his hands. After the first half, we played well again.”

If De Gea is ruled out of the PSG game, it will hand Henderson a major stage to operate on.

Neymar, Kylian Mbappe and co. are likely to provide a stern test of United’s defensive resolve, particularly as PSG trail the Red Devils by three points in Champions League Group G.

A commanding performance from Henderson could make him difficult to dislodge – with a rapid turnaround of games on the horizon.

Following PSG’s visit to Old Trafford, the Red Devils take on West Ham, RB Leipzig, Manchester City, Sheffield United, Leeds United and Everton before Christmas.

Source Article

Read More
fitness

Natarajan called into India squad; Rohit facing fitness test

SYDNEY (AP) — India has drafted Thangarasu Natarajan into its limited-overs squad as injury cover for the tour of Australia and set a Dec. 11 date for Rohit Sharma’s fitness test in the hope of having the star batsman available for the Border-Gavaskar Trophy.

India and Australia were to meet Friday at the Sydney Cricket Ground to start a series of three one-day and three Twenty20 internationals. The four-match test series is set to start with a day-night match in Adelaide on Dec. 17.

With skipper Virat Kohli scheduled to leave the tour following the first test to be at home with his wife for the birth of their first child in January, India will need top-order backup that Sharma can offer.

India’s squad finished a 14-day quarantine in Australia on the eve of the series-opener, and the Board of Control for Cricket in India later released a statement saying Natarajan, a left-arm seamer, had been added to the squad as cover for Navdeep Saini, who had a back problem.

The uncapped Natarajan was already in India’s T20 squad after performing well for Sunrisers in the Indian Premier League.

The BCCI said Rohit Sharma was in Mumbai undergoing rehabilitation on an hamstring injury and his medical assessment next month “will have clarity on his participation in the upcoming Border-Gavaskar Trophy in Australia.”

Fast bowler Ishant Sharma has recovered from a side strain sustained during the IPL but has been ruled out of test series against Australia.

___

More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

Source Article

Read More
fitness

Builder, 45, dies in prison days before facing trial for murdering fitness trainer girlfriend

Builder, 45, dies in prison days before facing trial for murdering his ‘beautiful and kind’ ex-army fitness trainer girlfriend, 26

  • Terence Papworth was charged with murder of Amy-Leanne Stringfellow in June
  • The mother-of-one was found critically injured at his flat in Doncaster on June 5
  • Papworth, 45, a builder, was due to face trial over Amy’s death on November 30 
  • He was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison in Leeds on Sunday, November 22 

A builder has died in prison days before he was due stand trial for the alleged murder of his ‘beautiful and kind’ girlfriend.

Terence Papworth, 45, was charged with the murder of mother-of-one Amy-Leanne Stringfellow, 26, in June.

Ms Stringfellow, who served in Afghanistan, was found critically injured in Papworth’s home in Balby, Doncaster, South Yorkshire, on June 5 this year.

Emergency services battled to save the fitness trainer, but she was declared dead at the scene.

Papworth was charged with her murder two days later and was due to stand trial next week.

However, he was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison, in Leeds, West Yorkshire, on Sunday.

Terence Papworth, 45, was charged with the murder of mum-of-one Amy-Leanne Stringfellow, 26, in June and was due to stand trial later this month

He was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison, in Leeds, West Yorkshire, on Sunday ahead of the trial, following Amy's (pictured) death

Terence Papworth (pictured left), 45, was charged with the murder of mum-of-one Amy-Leanne Stringfellow (pictured right), 26, in June and was due to stand trial later this month. He was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison, in Leeds, West Yorkshire, on Sunday

Papworth was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison (pictured), in Leeds, West Yorkshire, on Sunday

Papworth was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison (pictured), in Leeds, West Yorkshire, on Sunday

Papworth had recently appeared in court via video link for a case management hearing and was due to stand trial on November 30 at Sheffield Crown Court.

The Ministry of Justice said: ‘Terence Papworth died in HMP Leeds on 22 November.

‘The Prisons and Probation Ombudsman has been informed.’

Papworth and Ms Stringfellow, who has a young daughter, had been in a relationship since last October but they had not moved in together.

She had travelled the four miles from her home in Doncaster to see Papworth during lockdown.

After her death, South Yorkshire Police referred itself to the Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC) over prior contact they had with Ms Stringfellow.

Private Stringfellow enlisted in the Army in 2010 and completed assignments with 3rd Battalion the Rifles 3 RIFLES in Edinburgh and Chilwell.

She also served a tour of duty in Afghanistan in 2012 as part of the Operation Herrick 16 deployment.

Amy-Leanne Stringfellow, 26, was found critically injured at a house in Doncaster in June. She died a short while later, despite efforts to save her

Amy-Leanne Stringfellow, 26, was found critically injured at a house in Doncaster in June. She died a short while later, despite efforts to save her

Papworth was charged with murder and appeared at Doncaster Magistrates' Court in June. He was due to stand trial on November 30

Papworth was charged with murder and appeared at Doncaster Magistrates’ Court in June. He was due to stand trial on November 30

Amy had been promoted to Lance Corporal but was discharged before taking up the post.

The fitness fanatic rejoined as a Volunteer Reservist in 2017 and also worked as a personal trainer.

Tributes

Read More
health

Central Europe sounds alarm facing a shortages of medics as virus surges

KYJOV, Czech Republic (AP) — Soldiers in Poland are giving coronavirus tests. American National Guard troops with medical training are headed to the Czech Republic to work alongside doctors there. A Czech university student is running blood samples to labs, and the mayor of the capital is taking shifts at a hospital.

With cases surging in many central European countries, firefighters, students and retired doctors are being asked to help shore up buckling health care systems.

“This is actually terrifying,” Dr. Piotr Suwalski, the head of the cardiac surgery ward at a Polish hospital said on a day when daily COVID-19 cases rose 20% nationwide. “I think if we continue to gain 20% a day, no system can withstand it.”

Even before the pandemic, many countries in the region faced a tragic shortage of medical personnel due to years of underfunding in their public health sectors and an exodus of doctors and nurses to better paying jobs in Western Europe after the nations joined the European Union in 2004. Now, with the virus ripping through their hospitals, many health workers have been sickened, compounding the shortfall.

Over 13,200 medical personnel across the Czech Republic have been infected, including 6,000 nurses and 2,600 doctors, according to the doctors’ union.

It’s not just clinicians these countries need. Both Poland and the Czech Republic are building field hospitals as beds fill up on wards, and authorities say there are only 12 ventilators left in all hospitals taking COVID-19 patients in the region around Warsaw, the Polish capital.

This may sound familiar, but not for these countries. Many in the region imposed tough restrictions in the spring — including sealing borders and closing schools, stores and restaurants — and saw very low infection rates even as the virus killed tens of thousands in Western Europe.

READ MORE: France, Germany impose new lockdowns to curb virus spread

But now many central European countries are seeing an onslaught similar to the one their western neighbors experienced — and the same dire warnings.

As he announced new restrictions last week, Czech Prime Minister Andrej Babis put a date on when his country’s health system would collapse, if the new regulations were not imposed to slow the virus’s spread: between Nov. 7 and 11.

With one of the highest infection rates in Europe, the Czech Republic’s hospitals are desperately looking for volunteers. The government is deploying thousands of medical students to hospitals and other students to testing sites.

In the capital of Prague, Mayor Zdenek Hrib, who has a degree in medicine, volunteered to help do initial exams of possible coronavirus patients at a university hospital. Soon, 28 medical personnel from the Nebraska and Texas national guards are expected to arrive to help treat patients at Prague’s military hospital and a new field hospital at the city’s exhibition ground.

Croatia has asked former doctors to come out of retirement to help in hospitals, while Slovenia has put retired physicians and current medical students on standby in case its

Read More
health

Wisconsin facing ‘urgent crisis’ as cases rise

Wisconsin’s governor on Tuesday warned of an impending crisis as the state continues to see coronavirus cases rise and its hospitals overwhelmed.



a boy wearing a hat: Nyasia Camara, medical assistant, checks in a person for a COVID-19 test at the drive-thru testing site at Mercy Health Anderson Hospital, Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020. You must have an ID. They're open from 8am - 1pm and do about 70 tests each day. Over 5,000 deaths in Ohio have been reported during the pandemic, according to Ohio Department of Health.  Testing Political Signs Scenes For Wwlt


© Liz Dufour/The Enquirer/Imagn/USA Today
Nyasia Camara, medical assistant, checks in a person for a COVID-19 test at the drive-thru testing site at Mercy Health Anderson Hospital, Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020. You must have an ID. They’re open from 8am – 1pm and do about 70 tests each day. Over 5,000 deaths in Ohio have been reported during the pandemic, according to Ohio Department of Health. Testing Political Signs Scenes For Wwlt

“There is no way to sugarcoat it, we are facing an urgent crisis and there is an imminent risk to you and your family,” Gov. Tony Evers said.

Hospital beds in the state are 84% full, as well as 87% of intensive care unit beds, according to state data, as hospitalizations continue to escalate.

The state opened a hospital facility at the state fair grounds October 14, and five patients have been cared for there as of Tuesday.

More than 5,000 confirmed cases were reported in Wisconsin as of Tuesday, bringing the total number there to more than 200,000 — a “tragic” and “concerning” milestone, Evers said. The state’s death toll rose by 64 Tuesday, bringing the total to 1,852.

“The increasing cases, and our increase in deaths today are the largest single day increases we’ve seen throughout the course of this pandemic,” said Andrea Palm, Secretary-designee of Wisconsin’s Department of Health Services. “We must take significant and collective action.”

The state’s seven-day average of new cases has increased by more than 400%, Palm said. It took seven months for cases to reach 100,000 there, and only 36 days to hit 200,000 Evers said.

Evers’ warning comes as nearly half a million Americans tested positive for Covid-19 in just the last week as a fall surge of the contagious virus claws its way into every region of the country.

More than 8.7 million in US infected since pandemic began

The past seven days have been marked by daunting coronavirus records and upticks, with 489,769 new cases reported since October 20.

In the US, more than 8.7 million people have now been infected since the pandemic began, according to Johns Hopkins University.

The fall resurgence has led some local and state officials to rein in their reopening plans, as hospitalization numbers increase and states report case records. Still, public fatigue and political unwillingness to require masks and restrict gatherings — exemplified by the White House chief of staff’s frank admission that “we are not going to control the pandemic” — suggest worse days to come.

Dr. Scott Gottlieb, former commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration, said on CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Monday that the US was at a tipping point, where aggressive action could stem the worst of the pandemic.

“But we’re not going to do that and I understand why. There’s a lot of fatigue set in and a lot of policy resistance

Read More