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Women’s Sexual Medicine Expert, Dr. Adrienne Lara, Joins Exclusive Haute Beauty Network

Dr. Adrienne Lara joins exclusive Haute Beauty Network as a Women’s Sexual Medicine expert representing the Los Angeles market.

OXNARD, Calif. (PRWEB) December 01, 2020

At Celebrating Women Center in Oxnard, California, Dr. Adrienne Lara, MD, wants her patients to know that she went to medical school for you. She believes good patient care is collaborative and involves both the patient and doctor working together as a team to get to the same goal — patient wellness. Dr. Lara takes the time to listen to her patients to better understand who they are, so she’s not treating symptoms, but the whole patient, including their mind, body, and spirit.

Voted favorite MedSpa by the Ventura County Reporter and Best Med Spa Readers’ Choice County Star 2018, Celebrating Women Center offers a number of health and wellness treatments focused on regenerative medicine that allows patients’ natural beauty to shine through, including micro-needling, platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and vaginal rejuvenation with advanced medical treatments such as laser therapy and surgical procedures.

After beginning her career in health care as a nurse, Dr. Lara then went to medical school at Boston University School of Medicine and completed her internship and residency program in obstetrics and gynecology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, which is part of Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Lara takes great pride in her community and believes as a doctor it’s her role to teach and share her knowledge so that her patients understand that they have options. Her integrity and authenticity when it comes to health care are why she’s so loved by all who see her.

Dr. Lara is fluent in English and Spanish to serve patients from a variety of backgrounds.

Learn more about Dr. Adrienne Lara by visiting: https://hauteliving.com/hautebeauty/member/dr-adrienne-lara/

ABOUT HAUTE BEAUTY NETWORK:

Haute Beauty is affiliated with the luxury lifestyle publication Haute Living. As a section of Haute Living magazine, Haute Beauty covers the latest advancements in beauty and wellness, providing readers with expert advice on aesthetic and reconstructive treatments through its network of acclaimed doctors and beauty experts.

For more about Haute Beauty, visit https://hauteliving.com/hautebeauty/

For the original version on PRWeb visit: https://www.prweb.com/releases/women_s_sexual_medicine_expert_dr_adrienne_lara_joins_exclusive_haute_beauty_network/prweb17528982.htm

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fitness

Fitness expert reveals the EXACT snacks she buys to stay healthy



a woman standing in a room: MailOnline logo


© Provided by Daily Mail
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A Sydney personal trainer has revealed the supermarket snacks she buys while on-the-go to maintain optimal health every day.

Sophie Allen, 30, shared a video to her 358,000 Instagram followers on November 22 and detailed the top nutritious, budget-friendly snacks she recommends. 

The snack suggestions are suitable alternatives to consuming sugary foods, such as chocolate or lollies, and will help keep you fuller for longer during the day.  

‘Meal prep is the best way to stay on track, but we don’t always have time! Here are some of my go-to healthy and quick snacks I grab from the supermarket that don’t break the calorie bank,’ she captioned the post.

Scroll down for video



a woman standing in a room: Sydney personal trainer Sophie Allen (pictured) has revealed the supermarket snacks she buys while on-the-go to maintain optimal health every day


© Provided by Daily Mail
Sydney personal trainer Sophie Allen (pictured) has revealed the supermarket snacks she buys while on-the-go to maintain optimal health every day



a woman standing in front of a mirror posing for the camera: The snack suggestions are suitable alternatives to consuming sugary foods, such as chocolate or lollies, and will help keep you fuller for longer during the day


© Provided by Daily Mail
The snack suggestions are suitable alternatives to consuming sugary foods, such as chocolate or lollies, and will help keep you fuller for longer during the day

Blueberries and tomatoes

In the short video the first two suggestions were blueberries and cherry tomatoes, which can be added to separate fruit or vegetable salads or eaten directly from the packet once washed.

Blueberries have an array of proven health benefits, according to Healthline, as they are full of antioxidants, vitamins and can help protect against both aging and cancer.

Whereas tomatoes promote cardiovascular health, skin health and prevent the growth of abnormal cells.



a woman standing in front of a store: In the video the first two suggestions were blueberries and cherry tomatoes


© Provided by Daily Mail
In the video the first two suggestions were blueberries and cherry tomatoes



Blueberries have ten proven health benefits, according to Healthline, as they are full of antioxidants, vitamins and can help protect against both aging and cancer


© Provided by Daily Mail
Blueberries have ten proven health benefits, according to Healthline, as they are full of antioxidants, vitamins and can help protect against both aging and cancer

Brown rice cakes with avocado and tuna

Gallery: A guide to quarantine weight loss (StarsInsider)

For a quick morning or afternoon snack, organic brown rice cakes with quinoa are perfect to have with avocado and John West tuna.

Not only do the rice cakes contain few calories, but the avocado is filled with vitamins C, E, K, B6 and healthy fats necessary for maintaining health all year round. 

Adding tuna to the snack will also boost your daily protein consumption.

Protein yoghurt

Sophie also opts to eat YoPro yoghurt – a quick and easy snack that is packed with high protein and no added sugar.

Each tub contains 15 grams of protein and is available in a variety of delicious flavours for as little as $1.70 from Coles.

According to Healthline, yoghurt

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fitness

How to shop like a personal trainer: Fitness expert reveals the EXACT snacks she buys on-the-go

How to shop like a personal trainer: Fitness expert, 30, reveals the EXACT on-the-go snacks she buys from the supermarket to stay in peak shape

  • Sydney fitness coach Sophie Allen revealed the exact healthy snacks she buys
  • The 30-year-old shared a video on Instagram with her 358,000 followers
  • Some of the suggestions included blueberries, protein yoghurt and tuna 
  • She said the snacks are ideal to buy if you don’t have time to meal prep 

A Sydney personal trainer has revealed the supermarket snacks she buys while on-the-go to maintain optimal health every day.

Sophie Allen, 30, shared a video to her 358,000 Instagram followers on November 22 and detailed the top nutritious, budget-friendly snacks she recommends. 

The snack suggestions are suitable alternatives to consuming sugary foods, such as chocolate or lollies, and will help keep you fuller for longer during the day.  

‘Meal prep is the best way to stay on track, but we don’t always have time! Here are some of my go-to healthy and quick snacks I grab from the supermarket that don’t break the calorie bank,’ she captioned the post.

Scroll down for video

Sydney personal trainer Sophie Allen (pictured) has revealed the supermarket snacks she buys while on-the-go to maintain optimal health every day

Sydney personal trainer Sophie Allen (pictured) has revealed the supermarket snacks she buys while on-the-go to maintain optimal health every day

The snack suggestions are suitable alternatives to consuming sugary foods, such as chocolate or lollies, and will help keep you fuller for longer during the day

The snack suggestions are suitable alternatives to consuming sugary foods, such as chocolate or lollies, and will help keep you fuller for longer during the day 

Blueberries and tomatoes

In the short video the first two suggestions were blueberries and cherry tomatoes, which can be added to separate fruit or vegetable salads or eaten directly from the packet once washed.

Blueberries have an array of proven health benefits, according to Healthline, as they are full of antioxidants, vitamins and can help protect against both aging and cancer.

Whereas tomatoes promote cardiovascular health, skin health and prevent the growth of abnormal cells.

In the video the first two suggestions were blueberries and cherry tomatoes

Blueberries have ten proven health benefits, according to Healthline, as they are full of antioxidants, vitamins and can help protect against both aging and cancer

In the video the first two suggestions were blueberries and cherry tomatoes, which can be added to fruit or vegetable salads or eaten from the packet once washed

Brown rice cakes with avocado and tuna

For a quick morning or afternoon snack, organic brown rice cakes with quinoa are perfect to have with avocado and John West tuna.

Not only do the rice cakes contain few calories, but the avocado is filled with vitamins C, E, K, B6 and healthy fats necessary for maintaining health all year round. 

Adding tuna to the snack will also boost your daily protein consumption.

For a quick morning or afternoon snack, organic brown rice cakes with quinoa are perfect to have with avocado and John West tuna in spring water

Adding tuna to the snack will also boost your daily protein consumption

For a quick morning or afternoon snack, organic brown rice cakes with quinoa are perfect to have with avocado and John West tuna in spring water 

Sophie also opts to eat YoPro yoghurt - a quick snack that is packed with high protein and no added sugar

Sophie also opts to eat YoPro yoghurt – a quick snack that is packed with high protein and no added sugar 

Protein yoghurt

Sophie also opts to eat YoPro yoghurt – a quick and easy snack that is packed with high protein and no added

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fitness

Health, fitness expert Stephanie Mansour shares tips on how to lose weight over the holiday

The holidays can be a great time to spice up your workout routine, according to health and fitness expert Stephanie Mansour.

Spice up your at home workout this holiday season

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Mansour suggested investing in a few things to switch up your at home workout including a vibrating foam roller and a pilates ring.

The pilates ring can be used to tone multiple areas of your body and the roller can help massage your muscles before and after a workout to increase blood flow.

If you’re trying to be mindful about what you eat, Mansour also suggested a few easy swaps.

Skip some of the calories for an extra serving of vegetables by swapping pasta noodles for zucchini noodles.

Try some alternative flours such as almond or coconut in your holiday baking, Mansour suggested.

Or, to cut down on sugar, you can sub out sugar for apple sauce or honey, she said.

And if you are looking to treat yourself to some new athleisure wear this holiday season, Mansour shared some fashion trends.

Opt for leggings with cropped look or cut-outs as well as workout shirts with back cut-outs, she said. All the pieces are great for running laps and running errands.

Mansour has a whole host of other health and fitness tips available on her website.

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health

Prince William reportedly kept his coronavirus diagnosis a secret for this reason, royal expert claims

EXCLUSIVE: There’s a reason why Prince William may have kept his coronavirus diagnosis a secret from the world.

On Monday, The Sun reported the 38-year-old royal “struggled to breathe” while he battled the novel virus back in April during the early days of the global pandemic. The U.K.-based outlet reported the Duke of Cambridge didn’t speak out about the illness to avoid alarming the public.

“Here in Britain, there is controversy over the fact that we now discovered that he had COVID-19 back at the beginning of the first spike and he concealed it,” royal author Robert Lacey told Fox News. “At the time, the prime minister had coronavirus, his father had coronavirus.”

Lacey, who serves as a historical consultant to the hit Netflix series “The Crown,” recently released a new book titled “Battle of Brothers: William and Harry – The Inside Story of a Family in Tumult,” which examines the relationship and alleged feud between Princess Diana’s two sons.

PRINCE WILLIAM FOUGHT OFF CORONAVIRUS IN APRIL: REPORT

Britain's Prince William was reportedly diagnosed with coronavirus in April.

Britain’s Prince William was reportedly diagnosed with coronavirus in April.
(Photo by Tim Rooke/Pool/Samir Hussein/WireImage/Getty)

Lacey, who has been writing about the British royal family for 40 years and previously worked at the royal archives, spoke to numerous palace insiders for his latest release.

“[William] decided the world didn’t need him to be the third high-profiled coronavirus victim,” Lacey explained. “He followed all the rules. He did the quarantine, the self-isolating. He did Zoom, even while he was ill, and then got back to work.”

William reportedly tested positive only days after his father, Prince Charles, also tested positive for COVID-19 in late March.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson also contracted the virus around the same time. It is currently unclear if any other royals contracted the virus. It is believed William was treated by palace doctors and isolated in his Norfolk family home, Anmer Hall.

QUEEN ELIZABETH STEPS OUT WITH PRINCE WILLIAM FOR FIRST PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT SINCE MARCH

Prince William's father Prince Charles (pictured) was diagnosed with coronavirus in late March.

Prince William’s father Prince Charles (pictured) was diagnosed with coronavirus in late March.
(Getty)

A source told the outlet that the Duke of Cambridge, who is second in line to the throne, “was hit pretty hard by the virus.”

“At one stage he was struggling to breathe, so obviously everyone around him was pretty panicked,” they added. “After seeing medics and testing positive — which was obviously quite a shock given how fit and healthy he is — William was determined it should be business as usual though.”

After April 9, the royal took a weeklong break from phone calls and engagements before virtually opening the Nightingale Hospital Birmingham on April 16.

“People have said this is not right for an heir to the throne to keep this sort of thing a secret,” said Lacey. “He should be open. He’s hiding things from us. I, myself, in this case, do not agree with that criticism. It’s not unconstitutional to choose to be ill in private. He doesn’t have to share his pains and tribulations

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health

ACC Expert Consensus on Post-TAVR Arrhythmias

The American College of Cardiology (ACC) has released a new Expert Consensus Decision Pathway (ECDP) on the management of conduction disturbances after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR).

The document provides guidance to clinicians in identifying and managing this common complication of TAVR, covering the pre-TAVR, peri-procedural and post-TAVR periods.

“Conduction disturbances after TAVR are common and there is currently heterogeneity in how they’re managed, ranging from a casual observational approach to invasive electrophysiological studies and preemptive pacemaker implantation,” said writing committee chair Scott Lilly, MD, PhD, from Ohio State Wexner Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio.

“We felt this kind of collaborative effort to review what little research there is on this topic and come to [an] expert consensus was long overdue,” he added. 

The document was published online October 21 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 

Lilly stressed in an interview that this effort is an ECDP and not a guideline, “because there is not data out there to solidly stand on and say, ‘this is the way we should do things.’ “

His hope is that this document will generate more discussion on this topic and spur some (probably National Institutes of Health-sponsored) clinical trials to better guide practice.  

Not Uncommon and Not Decreasing

Complete heart block requiring permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation is seen in about 15% of patients within 30 days after TAVR. While this is a clear indication for PPM, there is no consensus on the management of less severe conduction disturbances such as new bundle branch or transient complete atrioventricular (AV) heart block.

Unlike the rates of bleeding, vascular injury, and stroke, which have decreased over time, the rates of in-hospital PPM implantation after TAVR have not changed significantly since commercialization in 2012. This is a concern as TAVR is increasingly used in younger, lower-risk patients.

“The pacemaker rate really hasn’t improved at a clip we would like to see if it was going to be a durable technology,” Lilly said.

Consensus regarding a reasonable strategy to manage cardiac conduction disturbances after TAVR has been elusive. This is a result of several things: a dearth of adequately powered, randomized controlled trials; the often transient nature of the conduction disturbances; evolving technologies; and the interplay of cardiology subspecialties involved.

The 2013 European Society of Cardiology guidelines address pacing post-TAVR, but do not provide in-depth discussion on the topic. This is the first effort sponsored by a cardiovascular society in the United States to review the existing data and experience and proposed evidence-based expert guidance.

Pre-TAVR Assessment

Pre-TAVR assessment should consider the patient’s risk for post-procedure conduction disturbances, the authors say. Since bradyarrythmias and aortic stenosis may present similarly (fatigue, lightheadedness, and syncope being hallmarks of both), a careful history is needed to determine if bradyarrhythmia is present.

An electrocardiogram (ECG) or ambulatory rhythm monitoring may identify baseline conduction abnormalities and help predict the need for post-TAVR PPM.

“In this section, we underscored some of the literature that has raised awareness about the presence of

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health

Daily Covid-19 cases will hit six digits soon, expert warns, as US reports one-day high of more than 83,000 infections

The US just marked a harrowing milestone: It recorded its highest one-day number of Covid-19 infections Friday at more than 83,000 — more than 6,000 higher than the country’s previous record set in July.



a person wearing a blue hat: An RN hands off a coronavirus sample to medical assistant Bettie Cleveland at a COVID-19 testing site set up by Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center at Prince Hall Grand Lodge in Grove Hall in Boston's Dorchester on Oct. 22, 2020. (Photo by Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)


© Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images
An RN hands off a coronavirus sample to medical assistant Bettie Cleveland at a COVID-19 testing site set up by Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center at Prince Hall Grand Lodge in Grove Hall in Boston’s Dorchester on Oct. 22, 2020. (Photo by Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

And as the fall surge continues, the daily numbers will get worse, experts warn.

“We easily will hit six-figure numbers in terms of the number of cases,” Michael Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota, told CNN Friday night. “And the deaths are going to go up precipitously in the next three to four weeks, following usually new cases by about two to three weeks.”

This comes as the country’s seven-day average of new daily cases surpassed 63,000 Friday — an 84% increase since the average started ticking back up in mid-September, according to Johns Hopkins University data.

Health officials say the steep inclines follow the reopening of schools and colleges across the US and have been largely driven by small gatherings — often family events — that are increasingly moving indoors, where the virus is likely to spread.

In Maryland, the governor said this week family gatherings were the No. 1 source of transmission in the state, followed by house parties. In North Carolina, health officials reported its highest daily case count Friday and said they continue to see clusters “from social and religious gatherings.”

Unlike many European countries that are also experiencing spikes, the US never lowered its daily case baseline very far, meaning the compounding of cases could be worse, experts say.

And that’s ahead of several popular holidays, when health officials worry more Americans could let their guard down and opt to visit family and friends and further drive surges.

In North Dakota, with the highest per capita new case rate in the country, Gov. Doug Burgum called for a “Thanksgiving challenge,” urging residents to follow mitigation guidance like masks and social distancing to bring numbers down by the holiday.

“It would be really great to be sharing with all of you at Thanksgiving that our numbers are going down as we head into the holiday period,” he said Friday. “That we’ve got increasing amounts of hospital capacity. That our schools have remained open, that our businesses are open during that holiday season.”

34 states report rise in cases

The President has said in recent days the country is rounding the corner when it comes to the pandemic. But alarming patterns across the country tell a different story.

At least 34 states reported more new Covid-19 cases in the last week than the week prior, according to Johns Hopkins data. In Georgia, health officials reported

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health

The most advanced Covid-19 vaccine trials won’t tell us if the shots save lives, expert notes

The most advanced trials for coronavirus vaccines cannot tell researchers if the shots will save lives, or even if they’ll prevent serious disease, a drug development expert pointed out Wednesday.



a woman smiling for the camera


© Reuters / University of Oxford


The ongoing trials are only designed to show if the vaccines prevent infection — and most infections are mild infections, Peter Doshi, an associate editor at the BMJ medical journal and a drug development specialist at the University of Maryland’s school of pharmacy, said.

“I think there are some pretty widely held assumptions about what we are getting out of Phase 3 studies,” Doshi told CNN.

“None of the trials currently under way are designed to detect a reduction in any serious outcome such as hospital admissions, use of intensive care, or deaths. Nor are the vaccines being studied to determine whether they can interrupt transmission of the virus,” Doshi wrote in the BMJ.

“Hospital admissions and deaths from Covid-19 are simply too uncommon in the population being studied for an effective vaccine to demonstrate statistically significant differences in a trial of 30,000 people. The same is true of its ability to save lives or prevent transmission: the trials are not designed to find out.”

Four vaccines being developed in the US are in the most advanced, Phase 3 stage of development: those being made by Moderna, Pfizer, AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson. They’re “event-driven” trials, meaning that the goal is to keep them going until a certain number of volunteers become infected. If more infections are seen among people who got placebo, or dummy shots, it’s an indication the vaccines prevented infection.

But that doesn’t mean the vaccines saved people from serious disease or death, Doshi argued.

“Severe illness requiring hospital admission, which happens in only a small fraction of symptomatic Covid-19 cases, would be unlikely to occur in significant numbers in trials,” he wrote.

The US Food and Drug Administration’s Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee meets Thursday to discuss the ongoing coronavirus vaccine trials and what members would like the FDA to consider when reviewing any applications for either emergency use authorization for a vaccine, or full approval.

Doshi said they should consider asking the companies to reconfigure their trials to include data on preventing severe illness and death.

“People expect that the most severe part of the Covid iceberg — the ICU admissions and hospitalizations and deaths — that’s what a vaccine would put an end to,” he said.

But the current trials will just look for early infections. It’s possible to keep these current trials going and add onto them so that they will, eventually, answer the question of whether Covid vaccines save lives and prevent severe disease.

“The trials are ongoing,” he told CNN. “There’s a chance for that. It’s not too late.”

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health

Covid-19 vaccine trials won’t tell us if the shots save lives, expert notes

The most advanced trials for coronavirus vaccines cannot tell researchers if the shots will save lives, or even if they’ll prevent serious disease, a drug development expert pointed out Wednesday.



a woman smiling for the camera


© Reuters / University of Oxford


The ongoing trials are only designed to show if the vaccines prevent infection — and most infections are mild infections, Peter Doshi, an associate editor at the BMJ medical journal and a drug development specialist at the University of Maryland’s school of pharmacy, said.

“I think there are some pretty widely held assumptions about what we are getting out of Phase 3 studies,” Doshi told CNN.

“None of the trials currently under way are designed to detect a reduction in any serious outcome such as hospital admissions, use of intensive care, or deaths. Nor are the vaccines being studied to determine whether they can interrupt transmission of the virus,” Doshi wrote in the BMJ.

“Hospital admissions and deaths from Covid-19 are simply too uncommon in the population being studied for an effective vaccine to demonstrate statistically significant differences in a trial of 30,000 people. The same is true of its ability to save lives or prevent transmission: the trials are not designed to find out.”

Video: AstraZeneca vaccine trial volunteer dies (CNN)

AstraZeneca vaccine trial volunteer dies

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Four vaccines being developed in the US are in the most advanced, Phase 3 stage of development: those being made by Moderna, Pfizer, AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson. They’re “event-driven” trials, meaning that the goal is to keep them going until a certain number of volunteers become infected. If more infections are seen among people who got placebo, or dummy shots, it’s an indication the vaccines prevented infection.

But that doesn’t mean the vaccines saved people from serious disease or death, Doshi argued.

“Severe illness requiring hospital admission, which happens in only a small fraction of symptomatic Covid-19 cases, would be unlikely to occur in significant numbers in trials,” he wrote.

The US Food and Drug Administration’s Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee meets Thursday to discuss the ongoing coronavirus vaccine trials and what members would like the FDA to consider when reviewing any applications for either emergency use authorization for a vaccine, or full approval.

Doshi said they should consider asking the companies to reconfigure their trials to include data on preventing severe illness and death.

“People expect that the most severe part of the Covid iceberg — the ICU admissions and hospitalizations and deaths — that’s what a vaccine would put an end to,” he said.

But the current trials will just look for early infections. It’s possible to keep these current trials going and add onto them so that they will, eventually, answer the question of whether Covid vaccines save lives and prevent severe disease.

“The trials are ongoing,” he told CNN. “There’s a chance for that. It’s not too late.”

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health

Vaccine Trials ‘Can’t Detect’ Virus Risk Reduction: Expert

None of the trials of Covid-19 candidate vaccines can detect a reduction in serious outcomes such as hospitalisation or death, a leading public health expert said Thursday.

Writing in the BMJ medical journal, associate editor Peter Doshi warned that not even phase 3 trials under way in the race for a vaccine can prove their product will prevent people contracting Covid-19.

In a sobering essay, Doshi said those hoping for a breakthrough to end the pandemic would be disappointed, with some vaccines likely to reduce the risk of Covid-19 infection by only 30 percent.

“None of the trials currently under way are designed to detect a reduction in any serious outcome such as hospital admissions, use of intensive care, or deaths,” he wrote.

“Nor are the vaccines being studied to determine whether they can interrupt transmission of the virus.”

The World Health Organization (WHO) has identified 42 candidate vaccines in clinical trials, ten of which are in the most advanced “phase 3” stage.

This is where a vaccine’s effectiveness is tested on a large scale, generally tens of thousands of people across several continents.

But Doshi, assistant professor of pharmaceutical health services research at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, said that even the most advanced trials are evaluating mild rather than severe disease.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has identified 42 candidate vaccines in clinical trials, ten of which are in the most advanced "phase 3" stage The World Health Organization (WHO) has identified 42 candidate vaccines in clinical trials, ten of which are in the most advanced “phase 3” stage Photo: AFP / Ludovic MARIN

This may be down to the numbers of people involved in trials, he said, pointing out that the majority of confirmed Covid-19 infections involve mild or no symptoms.

And few if any current trials are designed to find out whether there is a benefit among the elderly, a key at-risk constituency.

Without enrolling frail and elderly volunteers in trials in sufficient numbers, Doshi said “there can be little basis for assuming any benefit against hospitalisation or mortality.

He added that children, immunocompromised people and pregnant women had largely been excluded from trials, making it unlikely that the experiments will address key gaps in our understanding of how Covid-19 develops differently among individuals.

Several trials have already been halted after participants became ill.

Many countries plan to prioritise vulnerable people once a vaccine is available, but Doshi said that those hoping for a miracle end to the pandemic would have to wait.

He said that several pharmaceutical firms had designed their studies “to detect a relative risk reduction of at least 30 percent in participants developing laboratory confirmed Covid-19”.

Recent studies have also confirmed that it is possible for someone to be reinfected with Covid-19, a development that may impact how governments’ form their vaccination plans.

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