Europe

medicine

Europe Microtome Market to 2027: Market Opportunities with Growing Focus on Personalized Medicine

DUBLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Nov 2, 2020–

The “Europe Microtome Market to 2027 – Country Analysis and Forecasts by Product (Microtome Instruments, Microtome Accessories); Technology (Manual Microtomes, Semi-automated Microtomes, Fully Automated Microtomes); End User (Hospitals, Clinical Laboratories, Other End Users)” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

Europe microtome market is expected to reach US$ 58,738.7 thousand in 2027 from US$ 38,985.9 thousand in 2019. The market is predicted to grow with a CAGR of 5.4% from 2020-2027.

The growth of the Europe microtome market is estimated to grow due to critical factors such as the rising prevalence of cancer, and increasing adoption of digital pathology is expected to propel the growth of the market. Yet, the lack of skilled professionals is one of the major factors hindering the market growth.

Digital diagnosis has become a crucial aspect of the lab for surgical pathology. Nowadays, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) slides are digitally scanned into high-resolution digital images. These are then viewed, analyzed, and shared with other pathologists for better diagnostic results. With the global number of new cancer cases expected to rise, pathology laboratories are looking for ways to meet the increased demand for their services.

This has directed to the increasing adoption of digital pathology that allows laboratories to work more efficiently. Digitalization in pathology labs has been increasing witnessed in the US and other developed countries over the last few years. Increasing technological advancements in digital pathology are further accelerating the growth of the market for microtomes. For instance, Tissue-Tek Auto Section automated microtome from Sakura Finetek offers the advantage of automation over manual microtomes.

Moreover, increasing the volume of routine tissue examinations is also increasing the demand for auto mated microtomes in the forecast period. To handle such a large sample size automated microtomes offer numerous benefits to pathologies such as high speed, improved efficiency, and reduces strain.

With the dawn of digitalization, the healthcare sector has undergone significant changes. Rising prevalence of chronic conditions is leading to clinical urgency, thereby increasing the adoption of digital pathology to improve existing inferior diagnostic methods. Clinical laboratories have been widely using microtome for diagnosis purposes. Thus, increasing the adoption of digital pathology drives the growth of the Europe microtome market in the forecast period.

Europe microtome market, based on the product, was segmented into microtome instrument and microtome accessories. In 2019, the microtome instrument segment held the highest share of the market. Furthermore, the corresponding segment is expected to grow at the fastest rate during the upcoming years.

Based on technology, the Europe microtome market was segmented into fully automated microtomes, semi-automated microtomes, and manual microtomes. In 2019, a fully automated microtomes segment held the largest share of the market. Further, the same segment is anticipated to grow at the fastest rate during the forecasted period.

Based on end user, the Europe microtome market was segmented into clinical laboratories, hospital, and other end users (pharma biotech, academic research, agriculture). In 2019, the clinical laboratories segment held the largest share of the market. Besides,

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health

With coronavirus exploding in Europe, hospitals calculate how long until they hit capacity

For Germany, the breaking point could come in December. France and Switzerland might crack by mid-November. Belgium could hit its limit by the end of the week.



a person sitting in front of a mirror posing for the camera: Medical staff conduct a CT scan on a covid-19 patient in the intensive care unit at Havelhoehe community hospital in Berlin.


© Fabrizio Bensch/Reuters
Medical staff conduct a CT scan on a covid-19 patient in the intensive care unit at Havelhoehe community hospital in Berlin.

Europe, in the throes of a savage second wave of the pandemic, is on the verge of a medical crisis, with intensive care units quickly filling to the breaking point. Governments are finding that when confronted by the unforgiving reality of an exponentially spreading virus, even vast investments to expand hospital capacity can be washed away in days.

Germany, Europe’s best-resourced nation, risks being swamped even after increasing its intensive care beds by a quarter over the summer. Belgium, which had doubled its intensive care capacity, is now preparing for decisions about which needy patient should get a bed.

“This huge capacity we’ve built gave a false impression of security. It gave a higher buffer, but ultimately it only represents a week when you’re in an exponential phase,” said Emmanuel André, a leading Belgian virologist who has advised the government on the pandemic — and has bitterly criticized leaders for acting too slowly this fall.



Medical personnel work at the MontLégia hospital in Liège, Belgium.


© Valentin Bianchi/AP
Medical personnel work at the MontLégia hospital in Liège, Belgium.

In retrospect, the warning signs could be seen as early as July, when cases in Europe started ticking up again after the relaxation of spring lockdowns. In absolute terms, the numbers were still tiny. Spanish emergency room doctors enjoyed a respite, after being hammered in March and April. Italian nurses headed to the beach. Central European leaders — among the worst hit now, but back then largely untouched — gathered at the end of August for a triumphant conference to discuss the post-pandemic era.

But the math for exponential growth is as simple as it is scary. When two coronavirus cases double to four, and four cases double to eight, it doesn’t take long for the numbers to reach the tens of thousands — and beyond.

[Gloom settles over Europe as days darken and coronavirus surges]

“An exponential phenomenon starts with very small numbers, and it is not tangible for weeks and weeks and weeks for people out there,” André said. “If you look at the numbers, you have very strong indicators early on that things are going wrong, but it is only at the very end that things explode.”

Europe is now feeling the explosion.

The continent reported 1.5 million cases over the past week, the highest yet during the pandemic, the World Health Organization’s Europe director, Hans Kluge, told an emergency meeting of health ministers on Thursday. Deaths rose by a third in seven days. Occupancy of intensive care units doubled in 17 days leading up to Oct. 25 in countries tracked by the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control.

“Europe is at the epicenter of this pandemic once again,” Kluge said.

A week ago, French intensive

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health

Why Is Europe Keeping Its Schools Open, Despite New Lockdowns?

BERLIN — When Chancellor Angela Merkel announced the latest round of restrictions on public life, she named bars, restaurants, theaters, concert halls, gyms and tattoo parlors as institutions that would be forced to close. But missing from the list released on Wednesday were schools and day care centers — among the first to be shuttered in the spring lockdown.

In France, President Emmanuel Macron also said on Wednesday that schools would be exempt from wide-reaching nationwide restrictions that are to take effect beginning Friday. Ireland also allowed schools to remain open despite a nationwide lockdown that went into effect earlier this month.

Not everyone is happy with the decisions, but policymakers are taking extra precautions to reduce the risk in schools, from mask requirements for teachers and pupils, to regular airing of classrooms, to split use of schoolyards during breaks. They say they are applying hard-learned lessons from months of fighting the pandemic, and are prepared to change directions if things take a turn for the worse.

Micheal Martin, the Irish prime minister, said that while his country could no longer avoid restrictions, despite the detrimental impact on the economy, it was vital that schools remained open.

“We cannot and will not allow our children and young people’s futures to be another victim of this disease,” Mr. Martin said in a national address. “They need their education.”

Around the world, there is mounting concern that the pandemic is doing lasting harm to the academic and emotional development of an entire generation of children.

Earlier this month, the German conference of ministers of culture, who are responsible for coordinating education policy, stressed children’s right to an education, which they said is best served among peers, in classrooms. “This must take highest priority in making all decisions about restrictive measures that need to be taken,” the minister said.

In making her announcement, Ms. Merkel cited another reason that maintaining access to schools was important, pointing to the “dramatic social consequences” that closing schools and day care centers had on families during the lockdown in March and April.

“To name it clearly: Violent assaults against women and children increased dramatically,” Ms. Merkel said, justifying her government’s decision to halt sports, cultural events and close restaurants instead. “It is important to bear in mind the social consequences if we have to intervene in these issues.”

Keeping children at home often made it hard for parents — especially mothers — to devote their divided attention to work.

Medical experts point to many things they now know that were unknown back in the spring: with proper precautions, the rate of coronavirus transmission in schools is relatively low, especially among the youngest students; children who do get infected tend to have mild symptoms; and measures like mask-wearing, social distancing and air circulation are more effective than they had predicted.

But that does not mean open schools are risk-free. While schools are not known to have been a major

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health

France and Germany Announce New Restrictions as Cases Surge in Europe

Here’s what you need to know:

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French President Emmanuel Macron said the country would enact a second nationwide lockdown in an effort to slow the spread of the coronavirus.CreditCredit…Andrea Mantovani for The New York Times

France will reimpose a nationwide lockdown, while Germany will close bars and restaurants and impose other restrictions for a month in a last-ditch effort to protect hospitals from becoming overwhelmed with virus patients as Europe battles a second wave of the pandemic.

For months, European countries have tried to slow the spread of the virus through targeted restrictions aimed at avoiding the tough nationwide lockdowns imposed in the spring. But the measures have not succeeded at halting the surge in cases and hospitalizations, putting more drastic limits on daily life back in play.

This time, though, officials are prioritizing keeping schools and some economic activity open, in stark contrast to the spring, when movement was severely limited across much of Western Europe, and many businesses were ordered to close.

In a televised address on Wednesday evening, President Emmanuel Macron argued that officials had no choice but to impose another lockdown in the face of limited hospital capacity and rising cases across the country.

Mr. Macron stressed that much of Europe was facing a similar situation, “overwhelmed by a second wave that we now know will probably be harder and more deadly than the first.”

As in the spring, most nonessential businesses will close — including bars and restaurants — movement outside the home will be strictly limited, and private and public gatherings will be banned. Universities will pivot to online classes.

Some work sites, including in public services, factories, farms and construction, will remain open. While some people can travel to job sites, working from home will become the norm when possible, he said. Restrictions on retirement home visits and on funerals will not be as strict as in the spring.

“I know the weariness and the feeling of a day with no end,” Mr. Macron said, but he urged the French to remain “united.”

The lockdown will begin Thursday night and be in effect through at least Dec. 1, with financial assistance to affected businesses and tenants, he said.

About two-thirds of France’s population had already been subject to a 9 p.m. curfew announced two weeks ago. Yet cases have continued to rise: France reported 527 coronavirus deaths on Tuesday, the country’s highest number since April.

European stocks sank to their lowest levels in months on Wednesday amid the echoes of the early days of the pandemic. The Stoxx Europe 600 index tumbled 3 percent to its lowest level since May. In Britain, the FTSE 100 index also fell more than 2 percent, to its lowest since April. On Wall Street, the S&P 500 fell 3.53 percent Wednesday, its biggest one-day drop since June 11.

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German Chancellor Angela Merkel said the country will impose new restrictions, including the closure of restaurants, bars, and entertainment venues, in an effort to
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health

A new coronavirus variant is seen spreading across Europe, research says

  • A new variant of the coronavirus, identified as 20A.EU1 by researchers from Switzerland and Spain, was first observed in Spain in June.
  • It has been recorded in Spain at frequencies of above 40% since July, the study said.
  • Elsewhere, the new variant of the coronavirus has increased from “very low” values prior to July 15 to 40% to 70% in Switzerland, Ireland, and the U.K. in September.
  • It was also found to be prevalent in Norway, Latvia, the Netherlands, and France.



a person walking down a street next to a building: A waiter sweeps the street of a tapas bar area near Elvira street on October 24, 2020 in Granada, Spain.


© Provided by CNBC
A waiter sweeps the street of a tapas bar area near Elvira street on October 24, 2020 in Granada, Spain.

LONDON — A variant of the coronavirus that is believed to have originated in Spain has spread across Europe and now accounts for most of the new cases reported in several countries in the region, according to the findings of a new study.

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The research, which is due to published on Thursday and has not been peer reviewed, details how an international team of scientists has closely monitored the coronavirus through its genetic mutations.

Each variant of the coronavirus has its own genetic signature, meaning it can be traced back to the place it first emerged.

It says a new variant of the disease, identified as 20A.EU1 by researchers from Switzerland and Spain, was first observed in Spain in June. The new variant has been recorded in Spain at frequencies of above 40% since July, the study said.

Elsewhere, the new variant of the coronavirus has increased from “very low” values prior to July 15 to 40% to 70% in Switzerland, Ireland, and the U.K. in September. It was also found to be prevalent in Norway, Latvia, the Netherlands, and France.

New lockdowns will lead to ‘severe’ economic contractions, economist says, particularly in France

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Researchers of the study said they had no direct evidence to suggest the new variant of the virus spreads faster than other mutations, despite the rise in frequency across multiple countries.

It also said there was currently no data to assess the severity of the disease, and while 20A.EU1 was dominant in some countries, it had not taken over everywhere and diverse variants of the coronavirus “continue to circulate across Europe.”

The authors of the study comprised of researchers from the University of Basel, the Biomedicine Institute of Valencia, and the University of Valencia, among others.

What are the implications?

The findings of the study indicate that people returning from vacations in Spain may have played a role in spreading the new variant of the virus across Europe.

It also raises questions about whether a recent upsurge in the number of new reported Covid-19 infections across the region could have been capped by stricter travel measures and improved screening at airports and other transport hubs.

“It is currently unclear whether this variant is spreading because of a transmission advantage of the virus or whether high incidence in Spain followed by dissemination through tourists is

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health

Central Europe sounds alarm facing a shortages of medics as virus surges

KYJOV, Czech Republic (AP) — Soldiers in Poland are giving coronavirus tests. American National Guard troops with medical training are headed to the Czech Republic to work alongside doctors there. A Czech university student is running blood samples to labs, and the mayor of the capital is taking shifts at a hospital.

With cases surging in many central European countries, firefighters, students and retired doctors are being asked to help shore up buckling health care systems.

“This is actually terrifying,” Dr. Piotr Suwalski, the head of the cardiac surgery ward at a Polish hospital said on a day when daily COVID-19 cases rose 20% nationwide. “I think if we continue to gain 20% a day, no system can withstand it.”

Even before the pandemic, many countries in the region faced a tragic shortage of medical personnel due to years of underfunding in their public health sectors and an exodus of doctors and nurses to better paying jobs in Western Europe after the nations joined the European Union in 2004. Now, with the virus ripping through their hospitals, many health workers have been sickened, compounding the shortfall.

Over 13,200 medical personnel across the Czech Republic have been infected, including 6,000 nurses and 2,600 doctors, according to the doctors’ union.

It’s not just clinicians these countries need. Both Poland and the Czech Republic are building field hospitals as beds fill up on wards, and authorities say there are only 12 ventilators left in all hospitals taking COVID-19 patients in the region around Warsaw, the Polish capital.

This may sound familiar, but not for these countries. Many in the region imposed tough restrictions in the spring — including sealing borders and closing schools, stores and restaurants — and saw very low infection rates even as the virus killed tens of thousands in Western Europe.

READ MORE: France, Germany impose new lockdowns to curb virus spread

But now many central European countries are seeing an onslaught similar to the one their western neighbors experienced — and the same dire warnings.

As he announced new restrictions last week, Czech Prime Minister Andrej Babis put a date on when his country’s health system would collapse, if the new regulations were not imposed to slow the virus’s spread: between Nov. 7 and 11.

With one of the highest infection rates in Europe, the Czech Republic’s hospitals are desperately looking for volunteers. The government is deploying thousands of medical students to hospitals and other students to testing sites.

In the capital of Prague, Mayor Zdenek Hrib, who has a degree in medicine, volunteered to help do initial exams of possible coronavirus patients at a university hospital. Soon, 28 medical personnel from the Nebraska and Texas national guards are expected to arrive to help treat patients at Prague’s military hospital and a new field hospital at the city’s exhibition ground.

Croatia has asked former doctors to come out of retirement to help in hospitals, while Slovenia has put retired physicians and current medical students on standby in case its

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health

Short of medics as virus surges, central Europe sounds alarm

KYJOV, Czech Republic (AP) — Soldiers in Poland are giving coronavirus tests. American National Guard troops with medical training are headed to the Czech Republic to work alongside doctors there. A Czech university student is running blood samples to labs, and the mayor of the capital is taking shifts at a hospital.

With cases surging in many central European countries, firefighters, students and retired doctors are being asked to help shore up buckling health care systems.

“This is actually terrifying,” Dr. Piotr Suwalski, the head of the cardiac surgery ward at a Polish hospital said on a day when daily COVID-19 cases rose 20% nationwide. “I think if we continue to gain 20% a day, no system can withstand it.”


Even before the pandemic, many countries in the region faced a tragic shortage of medical personnel due to years of underfunding in their public health sectors and an exodus of doctors and nurses to better paying jobs in Western Europe after the nations joined the European Union in 2004. Now, with the virus ripping through their hospitals, many health workers have been sickened, compounding the shortfall.

Over 13,200 medical personnel across the Czech Republic have been infected, including 6,000 nurses and 2,600 doctors, according to the doctors’ union.

It’s not just clinicians these countries need. Both Poland and the Czech Republic are building field hospitals as beds fill up on wards, and authorities say there are only 12 ventilators left in all hospitals taking COVID-19 patients in the region around Warsaw, the Polish capital.

This may sound familiar, but not for these countries. Many in the region imposed tough restrictions in the spring — including sealing borders and closing schools, stores and restaurants — and saw very low infection rates even as the virus killed tens of thousands in Western Europe.

But now many central European countries are seeing an onslaught similar to the one their western neighbors experienced — and the same dire warnings.

As he announced new restrictions last week, Czech Prime Minister Andrej Babis put a date on when his country’s health system would collapse, if the new regulations were not imposed to slow the virus’s spread: between Nov. 7 and 11.

With one of the highest infection rates in Europe, the Czech Republic’s hospitals are desperately looking for volunteers. The government is deploying thousands of medical students to hospitals and other students to testing sites.

In the capital of Prague, Mayor Zdenek Hrib, who has a degree in medicine, volunteered to help do initial exams of possible coronavirus patients at a university hospital. Soon, 28 medical personnel from the Nebraska and Texas national guards are expected to arrive to help treat patients at Prague’s military hospital and a new field hospital at the city’s exhibition ground.

Croatia has asked former doctors to come out of retirement to help in hospitals, while Slovenia has put retired physicians and current medical students on standby in case its situation deteriorates.

Poland, meanwhile, is mobilizing soldiers to conduct COVID-19 testing,

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health

Nicox Granted New Patent for NCX 470, Extending Exclusivity in Europe to 2039

Press Release

Nicox Granted New Patent for NCX 470, Extending Exclusivity in Europe to 2039

 

October 29, 2020 – release at 7:30 am
Sophia Antipolis, France

 

Nicox SA (Euronext Paris: FR0013018124, COX), an international ophthalmology company, today announced that the European Patent Office has granted a formulation patent for NCX 470, extending the European exclusivity to 2039.  The equivalent U.S. patent has already been granted, and NCX 470 is also covered by granted composition of matter patents.

 

Gavin Spencer, Chief Business Officer at Nicox, said: “We are pleased that our formulation patent for NCX 470 has been granted in Europe, following the U.S. grant earlier in the year.  This strengthens our competitive position and provides further protection of this potential best-in-class product candidate for the lowering of intraocular pressure as we continue Phase 3 development and move it towards commercialization.

 

NCX 470, Nicox’s lead clinical product candidate, is a novel second-generation nitric oxide (NO)-donating bimatoprost analog for the lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension.  It is currently being evaluated in the Mont Blanc Phase 3 clinical trial which was initiated in the U.S. in June 2020 with top-line results currently expected in Q4 2021.  A second Phase 3 trial, Denali, is expected to start by the end of 2020, and will include clinical sites in both the U.S. and China, with the majority of the patients to be recruited in the U.S. 

 

NCX 470 is exclusively licensed to Ocumension Therapeutics for the Chinese, Korean and South East Asian markets.  The Denali trial is jointly funded by Nicox and Ocumension.

About NCX 470

NCX 470 is a novel, potential best-in-class, second generation nitric oxide (NO)-donating bimatoprost analog in development to reduce intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension.  Glaucoma is a group of ocular diseases in which the optic nerve is injured, leading to peripheral and, ultimately, central visual field loss and it can eventually lead to blindness if not treated. It is frequently linked to abnormally high IOP (~90% of patients) due to blockage or malfunction of the eye’s aqueous humor drainage system in the front of the eye.  In 2019, worldwide sales of treatments targeting glaucoma were over $6.0 billion out of a $21.9 billion worldwide market for ophthalmic drugs. 

NCX 470 is designed to release both bimatoprost and NO following instillation into the eye.  Bimatoprost, marketed under the brand name LUMIGAN® by Allergan, Inc., is one of the leading products in the class of prostaglandin analogs, the most widely used class of drugs for IOP-lowering in patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. 

About Nicox

Nicox S.A. is an international ophthalmology company developing innovative solutions to help maintain vision and improve ocular health.  Nicox’s lead program in clinical development is NCX 470, a novel, second-generation nitric oxide-donating bimatoprost analog, for lowering intraocular pressure in patients with glaucoma.  The company is also developing NCX 4251, a proprietary formulation of fluticasone, for acute exacerbations of blepharitis. 

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health

Europe Anti-Viral Therapies Market Forecast to 2027

The Europe anti-viral therapies market is expected to reach US$ 21,122. 66 million by 2027 from US$ 11,401. 67 million in 2019; it is estimated to grow at a CAGR of 8. 1% during 2020–2027. The market is growth is primarily attributed to the increasing R&D expenditures in pharmaceutical companies and rising government support for research activities and clinical trials in Europe.

New York, Oct. 28, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Reportlinker.com announces the release of the report “Europe Anti-Viral Therapies Market Forecast to 2027 – COVID-19 Impact and Regional Analysis By Type, Mechanism of Action, and Application, and Country” – https://www.reportlinker.com/p05978841/?utm_source=GNW
Additionally, strong pipeline of anti-viral drugs, and growing emphasis on launching anti-viral agents are likely to fuel the growth of the Europe anti-viral therapies market during the forecast period.

High cost of drug development is a key factor restraining the growth of the market.
Antiviral therapy is one of the most exciting branches of virology. These therapies are based on several strategies—direct-acting antivirals target viral proteins, enzymes, or nucleic acids; passive antibodies neutralize circulating viruses; and several other antivirals target cellular proteins or processes essential for viral replication.

Research and development (R&D) is an essential part of any business.Pharmaceutical companies focus on R&D to introduce new drugs with enhanced medical and commercial potential.

These companies invest majorly in R&D activities with an aim to deliver high-quality and innovative products in the market. As per the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry Pharmaceutical R&D expenditures grew by >11% in the UK in 2001, reaching an estimated US$ 5.23 billion. Johnson & Johnson, and Pfizer are among the top 10 leading R&D investing companies. The UK’s relative stability compared to the rest of Europe as a base for investment to an increase in R&D activity there by the three largest pharmaceutical investors. AstraZeneca, GlaxoSmithKline, and Pfizer collectively signify over 70% of total R&D spending in the UK, while other manufacturers with a significant presence in the country include Merck, Sharp & Dohme, Organon, Eli Lilly, and Novartis. Additionally, the pharma companies in the Germany are highly engaged in R&D activities.

Europe has witnessed exponential growth in the count of COVID-19 cases.Spain, Italy, Germany, France, and the UK are among the most affected European countries.

Growing research activities to develop treatment against corona virus is likely to favor the growth of the market in this region.In June 2020, the scientists from the University of Oxford tested existing drugs as therapies against this novel virus.

Further, the European Commission in July authorized the anti-viral drug Remdesivir for its use in the treatment of COVID-19 patients, making it the first approved drug in the European Union for the treatment.

In 2019, the branded drugs segment accounted for a larger share of the Europe antiviral therapies market.The branded antiviral drugs are more trusted than the generic drugs.

Further, robust research and development activities, increasing number of drug discoveries, and rising number of patents for drugs are the factors supporting the growth of this segment.

A

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health

Europe Avocado Oil Market Forecast to 2027

The Europe avocado oil market is expected to grow from US$ 120. 30 million in 2018 to US$ 257. 05 million by 2027; it is estimated to grow at a CAGR of 8. 9% from 2019 to 2027. Avocado oil are perceived to be one of the healthiest ingredients which can be used in various food products such as bakery & confectionary, beverages, dairy & frozen desserts, and sweet & savory snacks.

New York, Oct. 28, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Reportlinker.com announces the release of the report “Europe Avocado Oil Market Forecast to 2027 – COVID-19 Impact and Regional Analysis By Type, Nature, Variety, Application, and Distribution Channel” – https://www.reportlinker.com/p05978842/?utm_source=GNW
Avocado oil is gaining high popularity among the consumers due to rising awareness about the health benefits offered by avocado oil.

Avocado oil also has numerous benefits due to its high content of antioxidants and healthy fats.Various studies show that avocado oil benefits heart health and help in reducing blood pressure and blood cholesterol levels.

Avocado oil is a good source of lutein, a carotenoid that is naturally found in eyes.This nutrient improves eye health and also lowers the risk of age-related eye diseases.

Some nutrients need fat in order to be absorbed by the body. Therefore, rising awareness among the consumers about the health benefits of avocado oil is projected to boost its demand over the forecast period.
Based on variety, the Hass segment led the Europe avocado oil market in 2018.The Hass variety of avocado that has a dark green colored bumpy skin is the cultivar of avocado.

The Hass avocado is large, with weight ranging from 200 to 300 grams.When these avocados ripe, their skin turns into dark purplish-black and yields a gentle pressure.

It becomes white to green in the middle part of preparing the food and is ready to serve after the change of its color.The Hass avocado was first grown and sold by the southern California mail carrier and amateur horticulturist Rudolph Hass who later gave his name to these avocados.

Due to the taste, size, shelf-life, high growth yield, and year-round harvesting possibilities in some areas, the Hass variety is the most commercially popular avocado across the world. The Hass avocado trees flourish in the regions that have the right combination of abundant sunshine, mineral-rich soil, moderate humidity, warm days, and cool night.
In Europe, Italy is the hardest-hit country by the coronavirus outbreak.Italy recorded the highest number of coronavirus cases.

The country is expected to suffer an economic hit due to the lack of revenue from various industries.Other member states have implemented drastic measures and travel restrictions, including partially closing their borders.

This is anticipated to restrain the market growth in Europe. Many countries in Europe has issued and extended their lockdown period in order to sustain the virus.
The overall Europe avocado oil market size has been derived using both primary and secondary sources.To begin the research process, exhaustive secondary research has been conducted using internal and external sources to obtain

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