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Dentist’s warning after healthy dad-of-seven who didn’t drink or smoke dies aged 37

A dentist has warned that thousands of Brits may be unknowingly living with mouth cancer after a “healthy” dad-of-seven died from the disease.

Alan Birch, 37, lived a healthy, active lifestyle and did not drink or smoke but died from an aggressive form of mouth cancer in April.

The self-employed plasterer, from Wirral in Merseyside, was diagnosed with mouth cancer in 2018, and had to have 90 per cent of his tongue removed, Liverpool Echo reports.

Despite Alan undergoing both radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the cancer returned each time and specialists told his devastated family there was nothing more they could do for him.

Alan and his partner of 12 years, Debbie McDonough, decided to get married in February, but he tragically died a few weeks later in April.

Dad-of-seven Alan Birch died of mouth cancer in April

Alan lived a healthy, active lifestyle and did not drink or smoke

With the latest figures from the British Dental Association showing that 19 million treatments have been missed due to lockdown, dentists are now concerned about the number of cases of mouth cancer that will have potentially gone undiagnosed this year as a result.

Mouth cancer takes more lives than cervical cancer and testicular cancer combined, with 8,722 new cases reported in the UK last year. This is a 58 per cent increase compared to a decade ago and a 97 per cent rise since 2000.

Debbie said: “I would urge people to always keep on top of their dentist appointments as they are the ones who notice the warning signs for mouth and tongue cancer.

“Always be careful of ulcers especially if you have them longer than two weeks, and never think you are wasting an appointment if you are worried about anything. It’s better to be safe than sorry.”

Alan had 90 per cent of his tongue removed when he was diagnosed with mouth cancer in 2018

New research revealed that 52 per cent of people living in the North-West are unaware their dentist will screen them for mouth cancer during a routine check-up.

Dr Catherine Tannahill, dentist and director of clinical dentistry at Portman Dental Care, which carried out the research, said: “As dentists we see first-hand the impact this disease can have, and that’s why we want to ensure people are aware of what the signs and symptoms are, what to do if they spot an issue and what steps they can take to reduce the risk of developing mouth cancer.

“This is now more important than ever before, as thousands of diagnoses may have potentially been missed this year due to dental practices having to close in initial lockdown, and the subsequent backlog of appointments since.

“While this may sound alarming, early diagnosis of mouth cancer leads to a 90 per cent survival rate, which is why it is imperative that people continue visiting their dentist for regular check-ups.

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Dentist’s warning after ‘healthy and active’ dad dies at aged 37

A healthy dad of seven who died after being diagnosed with an aggressive type of mouth cancer has led to warnings from dentists.

Alan Birch was just 35 when he had 90% of his tongue removed as a result of the disease in 2018. His cancer diagnosis came as a shock, as he lived a healthy, active lifestyle and did not drink or smoke.

Alan, from Moreton in Merseyside underwent both radiotherapy and chemotherapy, but despite the treatment, the cancer returned each time – and even more aggressively.

His devastated family were then faced with the news that there was nothing more that could be done for him, giving him just months to live.

Alan died in April, just weeks after marrying his partner of 12 years, Debbie McDonough.

His wife Debbie told the ECHO at the time: “I would urge people to always keep on top of their dentist appointments as they are the ones who notice the warning signs for mouth and tongue cancer.

“Always be careful of ulcers especially if you have them longer than two weeks, and never think you are wasting an appointment if you are worried about anything. It’s better to be safe than sorry.”

His tragic case has now prompted concerns that thousands of cases are going undiagnosed.

While figures from the British Dental Association show that 19 million treatments have been missed due to the coronavirus pandemic and the subsequent lockdowns.

Dentists are now concerned that large numbers of cases of mouth cancer could have potentially gone undetected this year as a result.

Mouth cancer claims more lives annually than cervical cancer and testicular cancer combined, with 8,722 new cases reported in the UK last year. This is a 58% increase compared to a decade ago and a 97% rise since 2000.

But research states there is still a chronic lack of awareness and knowledge surrounding this type of cancer – and dentists are keen to rectify this.

New research revealed that 52% of people living in the north west are unaware their dentist will screen them for mouth cancer during a routine check-up. This figure was highest with those aged between 25-35, increasing to 61%.



a man and a woman sitting at a table: Alan Birch, who was diagnosed with terminal cancer of the mouth, signs the marriage register with his long-term partner - now wife - Debbie McDonough


© Joe Hague Photography
Alan Birch, who was diagnosed with terminal cancer of the mouth, signs the marriage register with his long-term partner – now wife – Debbie McDonough

Dr Catherine Tannahill, dentist and director of clinical dentistry at Portman Dental Care, which carried out the research, said: “As dentists we see first-hand the impact this disease can have, and that’s why we want to ensure people are aware of what the signs and symptoms are, what to do if they spot an issue and what steps they can take to reduce the risk of developing mouth cancer.

“This is now more important than ever before, as thousands of diagnoses may have potentially been missed this year due to dental practices having to close in initial lockdown, and the subsequent backlog of appointments since.

“While this

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Dentist issues warning after ‘healthy’ dad dies at 37

The tragic case of a Wirral dad-of-seven who lost his battle with an aggressive form of mouth cancer has led to concerns that thousands of cases are going undiagnosed.

Alan Birch, 37, had 90% of his tongue removed when he was diagnosed with mouth cancer in 2018.

Despite Alan undergoing both radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the cancer returned each time and specialists told his devastated family there was nothing more they could do for him.

The news was even more shocking as Alan, a self-employed plasterer from Moreton, lived a healthy, active lifestyle and did not drink or smoke.

It was after learning of the devastating diagnosis that Alan and his partner of 12 years, Debbie McDonough, decided to get married. The wedding ceremony in February was attended by more than 150 family and friends.

Debbie said at the time: “Usually the cancer he has is curable, but he got it in a very aggressive form. Every time they operated, it came back worse.”



a group of people posing for the camera: Dad-of-seven Alan Birch, pictured with his partner Debbie


© Liverpool Echo
Dad-of-seven Alan Birch, pictured with his partner Debbie

After winning hearts across Merseyside, sadly Alan died a few weeks later in April.

Mouth cancer takes more lives than cervical cancer and testicular cancer combined, with 8,722 new cases reported in the UK last year. This is a 58% increase compared to a decade ago and a 97% rise since 2000.



a man and a woman sitting at a table: Alan Birch and Debbie McDonough on their wedding day in February


© Joe Hague Photography
Alan Birch and Debbie McDonough on their wedding day in February

With the latest figures from the British Dental Association showing that 19 million treatments have been missed due to lockdown, dentists are now concerned about the number of cases of mouth cancer that will have potentially gone undiagnosed this year as a result.

But there is still a lack of awareness and knowledge around this type of cancer – something which dentists are keen to continue to try and rectify.

This comes as new research revealed that 52% of people living in the north-west are unaware their dentist will screen them for mouth cancer during a routine check-up. This figure was highest with those aged between 25-35, increasing to 61%.

What are the latest coronavirus figures for where you live? Find out by adding your postcode.

Dr Catherine Tannahill, dentist and director of clinical dentistry at Portman Dental Care, which carried out the research, said: “As dentists we see first-hand the impact this disease can have, and that’s why we want to ensure people are aware of what the signs and symptoms are, what to do if they spot an issue and what steps they can take to reduce the risk of developing mouth cancer.

“This is now more important than ever before, as thousands of diagnoses may have potentially been missed this year due to dental practices having to close in initial lockdown, and the subsequent backlog of appointments since.

“While this may sound alarming, early diagnosis of mouth cancer leads to a 90% survival rate, which is why it is imperative that people continue visiting their dentist

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fitness

Builder, 45, dies in prison days before facing trial for murdering fitness trainer girlfriend

Builder, 45, dies in prison days before facing trial for murdering his ‘beautiful and kind’ ex-army fitness trainer girlfriend, 26

  • Terence Papworth was charged with murder of Amy-Leanne Stringfellow in June
  • The mother-of-one was found critically injured at his flat in Doncaster on June 5
  • Papworth, 45, a builder, was due to face trial over Amy’s death on November 30 
  • He was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison in Leeds on Sunday, November 22 

A builder has died in prison days before he was due stand trial for the alleged murder of his ‘beautiful and kind’ girlfriend.

Terence Papworth, 45, was charged with the murder of mother-of-one Amy-Leanne Stringfellow, 26, in June.

Ms Stringfellow, who served in Afghanistan, was found critically injured in Papworth’s home in Balby, Doncaster, South Yorkshire, on June 5 this year.

Emergency services battled to save the fitness trainer, but she was declared dead at the scene.

Papworth was charged with her murder two days later and was due to stand trial next week.

However, he was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison, in Leeds, West Yorkshire, on Sunday.

Terence Papworth, 45, was charged with the murder of mum-of-one Amy-Leanne Stringfellow, 26, in June and was due to stand trial later this month

He was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison, in Leeds, West Yorkshire, on Sunday ahead of the trial, following Amy's (pictured) death

Terence Papworth (pictured left), 45, was charged with the murder of mum-of-one Amy-Leanne Stringfellow (pictured right), 26, in June and was due to stand trial later this month. He was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison, in Leeds, West Yorkshire, on Sunday

Papworth was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison (pictured), in Leeds, West Yorkshire, on Sunday

Papworth was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison (pictured), in Leeds, West Yorkshire, on Sunday

Papworth had recently appeared in court via video link for a case management hearing and was due to stand trial on November 30 at Sheffield Crown Court.

The Ministry of Justice said: ‘Terence Papworth died in HMP Leeds on 22 November.

‘The Prisons and Probation Ombudsman has been informed.’

Papworth and Ms Stringfellow, who has a young daughter, had been in a relationship since last October but they had not moved in together.

She had travelled the four miles from her home in Doncaster to see Papworth during lockdown.

After her death, South Yorkshire Police referred itself to the Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC) over prior contact they had with Ms Stringfellow.

Private Stringfellow enlisted in the Army in 2010 and completed assignments with 3rd Battalion the Rifles 3 RIFLES in Edinburgh and Chilwell.

She also served a tour of duty in Afghanistan in 2012 as part of the Operation Herrick 16 deployment.

Amy-Leanne Stringfellow, 26, was found critically injured at a house in Doncaster in June. She died a short while later, despite efforts to save her

Amy-Leanne Stringfellow, 26, was found critically injured at a house in Doncaster in June. She died a short while later, despite efforts to save her

Papworth was charged with murder and appeared at Doncaster Magistrates' Court in June. He was due to stand trial on November 30

Papworth was charged with murder and appeared at Doncaster Magistrates’ Court in June. He was due to stand trial on November 30

Amy had been promoted to Lance Corporal but was discharged before taking up the post.

The fitness fanatic rejoined as a Volunteer Reservist in 2017 and also worked as a personal trainer.

Tributes

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fitness

Fitness warning after tourist dies climbing Phu Kradueng

Tourists enjoy the dawn from Pha Nok An cliff, at the top of Phu Kradueng mountain in Loei. (Bangkok Post file photo)
Tourists enjoy the dawn from Pha Nok An cliff, at the top of Phu Kradueng mountain in Loei. (Bangkok Post file photo)

Visitors to Phu Kradueng and other mountains should ensure they are fit enough to make the climb, Natural Resources and Environment Minister Varawut Silpa-archa said on Monday, after a tourist had a fatal heart attack on his way to top of the national park.

Phu Kradueng National Park chief Samret Phusansri said on Sunday that a 62-year-old man had suffered a heart attack while on a trail to the top of the mountain with three friends 

They had arrived at the park, in Phu Kradueng district of Loei, from Samut Sakhon about 10.30am and started the steep climb four hours later.

The man, whose name was not released, collapsed on the trail, about three kilometres from the park entrance. His friends called for help and medics gave him oxygen before taking him back down the mountain. He was later pronounced dead. 

The trail from the foot of the mountain to the top of Phu Kradueng is nine kilometres long. It takes at least three hours to arrive at the camping areas on the plateau, depending on the hiker’s fitness. 

Mr Varavut said all visitors to Phu Kradueng and other mountain parks should ensure their  health is good and they are fit enough to make the climb.

The minister said, however, the visitor’s death should not be used by supporters of a controversial proposed cable car to push for approval for the project. 

The proposed cable car to the top of the mountain has been subject to debate for many years, with supporters claiming it would allow the elderly and people unable to make the climb to enjoy the park’s most famous feature – the view from the top at dawn. Opponents say it would only ruin the scenary.

Phu Kradueng is one of the most popular parks in the country. Only 2,000 people are allowed in at a time. It is always full on long weekends, including the holiday from Thursday last week to Sunday.

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Dentist dies of cardiac issue

Behjath Hussain, a dentist, who had been kidnapped for ransom by his relatives and rescued by Cyberabad police two weeks ago, died of massive heart stroke on Wednesday.

Rajendra Nagar Assistant Commissioner of Police K Ashok Chakravarthy said that for the past one week the dentist had not been keeping well and two days ago he was admitted in a private hospital.

“On Wednesday morning, he suffered massive heart and died while he was being taken to a hospital,” he said.

His funeral was performed by the family members at a graveyard in Hussaini Alam area in the old city. On October 27, the dentist, who was also a realtor, was kidnapped for a ransom of ₹10 crore in bitcoins. When rescued, Hussain’s nails were cut and injuries were found on his face and head.

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Hyderabad dentist who was kidnapped dies two weeks after dramatic rescue

Behjath Hussain, the Hyderabad dentist who was rescued from an elaborately planned kidnap two weeks ago, passed away on Wednesday. Hussain, who was 56, was abducted on October 27 in the afternoon. The kidnappers had worn burqas, and were brandishing what were later found to be toy pistols. Demanding a ransom of Rs 10 crore in bitcoin, the accused were escorting Hussain to a location in Karnataka to wait until they received the amount. They were intercepted by police in Andhra’s Raptadu town in the early hours of October 28, and Hussain was rescued. In less than two weeks, however, he died after suffering a heart attack. 

“Hussain’s family informed us yesterday that he had passed away, and that he had suffered a heart attack on Tuesday night,” Rajendranagar Inspector of Police G Suresh told TNM. Hussain was kidnapped from his hospital in Bandlaguda, located in the Rajendranagar police station limits. According to reports, other than the trauma he suffered, he had also been upset that a family member was behind the kidnap plot.

The police personnel who rescued him had said that the doctor was made to sit on the floor of the car, and could have easily been mistaken for a bag of luggage. The kidnappers had tied up Hussain’s wrists, and a long piece of cloth was found rotated around his neck along with a lot of packing tape. Covered with a sheet, Hussain was found writhing in pain with his fingers and legs bruised. Narrating the events, Hussain had said that the kidnappers beat him as he tried to resist, before carrying him away from his hospital. 

The Cyberabad police nabbed seven of the 12 accused, all of them in the age group of 18 to 28 years. The prime accused was found to be a relative of the dentist’s wife, who had been living in Australia and planned the kidnapping for money. The 12 accused had been split into two teams, one to carry out the abduction and one to escort Hussain to Karnataka to a safe location, where they would wait until the ransom was received. Three of the accused  are from Udupi in Karnataka, and some of them were from Pune in Maharashtra while the others were from Hyderabad.  

Read: Kidnapped Hyderabad dentist rescued, kidnappers demanded Rs 10 crore in bitcoins

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City dentist dies of heart attack weeks after rescue | Hyderabad News

Hyderabad: A city-based dentist, Dr Behjat Hussain, who was abducted for ransom, and later rescued by Cyberabad police on October 28 in a dramatic operation, died of cardiac arrest on Wednesday morning.
“The dentist was suffering from shock and trauma since he came back and wasn’t being able to get over that a family member was behind it. he was in shock,” said a police officer probing the case.
While the cops arrested 12 suspects within 24 hours, but the kingpin of the kidnapping racket identified as the brother-in-law of the dentist, is still at large and reportedly hiding in Maharashtra.
The kidnappers demanded a ransom of Rs 1 crore but the police foiled the plan.
Behjat Hussain suffered a heart attack on Wednesday morning upon which he was rushed to the hospital and later he died. The family members performed his funeral at a local graveyard in Hussaini Alam area in the old city.
On October 26, a team of 13 inter-state kidnappers abducted the dentist for ransom from his clinic at Qismatpur village, Bandlaguda Jagir under Rajendra Nagar police station limits and while the victim was being shifted to Bengaluru, a police team from Anantapur in Andhra Pradesh intercepted the car and rescued the doctor.

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medicine

Dr. Juan Fitz, a ‘hero of emergency medicine,’ dies of Covid-19 in Texas

When Dr. Juan Fitz, an emergency medicine physician in Lubbock, Texas, caught the coronavirus, he viewed it like he did everything else: as an opportunity to help others.

Fitz, 67, “lived and breathed emergency medicine,” said Dr. Michael Chamales, the medical director of the Covenant Health Emergency Departments in Lubbock and a fellow ER physician who worked with Fitz for 15 years.

So it was not a surprise to those who knew him that Fitz planned on using his diagnosis to educate the public.

Hospitalized in early October with shortness of breath at Covenant Medical Center, where he worked for nearly 20 years, he texted a longtime friend, Christy Martinez-Garcia, to tell her he was sick. Martinez-Garcia is the publisher of a monthly news publication serving Lubbock’s Latino community for which Fitz wrote health columns, and when she asked him if he would be willing to share what Covid-19 symptoms felt like with her readers once he got out of the hospital, Fitz did not hesitate to say yes.

“We just said, once you get done, we’ll do an interview on our Facebook page,” Martinez-Garcia, 52, said. “That got him excited.”

Instead, Fitz’s condition worsened, and he was transferred to the intensive care unit, where he was later put on a ventilator, his daughter, Natassja “Tasha” Sloan, said. On Nov. 3, he died.

Fitz was a larger-than-life presence wherever he went, Sloan, 36, who also lives in Lubbock, said. He loved to dance, watch “Looney Tunes” and trash-talk anyone who rooted against the football team at his medical school alma mater, Texas Tech University.

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But his true passion was emergency medicine, Sloan said. He chose to go into the field because he loved mysteries.

Tasha Sloan with her father, Dr. Fitz. (Courtesy Tasha Sloan)
Tasha Sloan with her father, Dr. Fitz. (Courtesy Tasha Sloan)

“He always said, ‘It’s something new every day,’” Sloan, an insurance billing specialist, said. “In the emergency department, you’re solving a case, and you have a short amount of time.”

Fitz was an active member of the Texas College of Emergency Physicians and the Lubbock County Medical Society. His dedication to his patients garnered him multiple awards, including in 2008, when he was recognized as a “Hero of Emergency Medicine” by the American College of Emergency Physicians.

“A really good friend of mine told me, ‘God needed a damn good doctor in heaven, and hand-picked your dad,’” Sloan said. “I’m like, ‘Could he have not picked someone else?’”

“A really good friend of mine told me, ‘God needed a damn good doctor in heaven, and hand-picked your dad.’”

Fitz was born in El Paso, raised by parents who both spoke Spanish as their first language. Fluent in Spanish himself, he was particularly interested in helping Latino patients. For 15 years, he wrote for Martinez-Garcia’s bilingual publication, Latino Lubbock Magazine, educating readers about everything from the importance of flu shots to the dangers of leaving toddlers in hot cars.

“He utilized his language skills and his cultural background to make that connection,” Martinez-Garcia said,

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Former vice mayor, longtime dentist and noted public servant Butler dies at 96 | Local News



wendell butler

Wendell Butler




Wendell Butler was a giant of Roanoke government, education, religious faith and medical care — a “gentle giant,” according to people who knew him.

“He was just a pillar of integrity, honesty and care,” said Wanda Walters, one of Butler’s daughters.

Butler, who died Thursday at the age of 96, was a former Roanoke vice mayor who served as the first Black chairman of the Roanoke School Board as well as on numerous other boards and commissions.

Plus, he was a well-known dentist who served predominantly northwest Roanoke families for decades while working in his office on 11th Street Northwest.

“He was everybody’s dentist,” Walters said.

Butler died less than three weeks after the death of his wife of 71 years, Susie Butler, who was also 96. Both Butlers died from complications of COVID-19, the family said.

Wendell Butler was a native Texan who studied at Howard University, where he met Susie, a standout athlete and dancer. In 1953, four years after they married, the Butlers moved with their young family to Roanoke, close to Susie’s hometown of Covington.

As legal racial segregation crumbled throughout Virginia, Butler became more involved with public service. In 1968, he was appointed to the Roanoke Redevelopment and Housing Authority’s board of commissioners. Two years later, the Roanoke City Council appointed him to the school board, where he served for 10 years and became the first African American chair in 1976.

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