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Kendra Hatcher’s Death: How the Dentist Died

Ricky Paniagua Kendra Hatcher


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Brenda Delgado (left) and Ricky Paniagua with Kendra Hatcher (right)

Kendra Hatcher was a pediatric dentist who was killed in a murder-for-her plot devised by her boyfriend’s ex-girlfriend, Brenda Delgado, in Dallas in 2015.

Delgado, 31, recruited two acquaintances, Kristopher Love and Crystal Cortes, to carry out the killing after her ex-boyfriend, Dr. Ricardo “Ricky” Paniagua, told her in an email he was in a new relationship, and it was going well. Hatcher was 35.

Dateline NBC is diving into the case on a new episode, which airs Friday, November 13, 2020 at 9 p.m. Eastern time.

Here’s what you need to know:


Delgado Hired a Small-Time Marijuana Dealer & a Single Mom to Help Her Carry Out Her Murder Plot

Love, who was convicted of pulling the trigger on Hatcher, and Cortes, who was recruited as the getaway driver, were people Delgado “barely knew” when she asked them to help her kill Hatcher, according to a profile by Texas Monthly. Love was a small-time marijuana dealer and Cortes was “a down-on-her-luck single mother.”

Cortes was offered $500 to serve as the getaway driver. When asked why she was willing to take $500 to be involved in a murder, she gave the Texas Monthly reporter “a blank look.”

“I was broke,” she said. “And I had a son to support.”

Love, on the other hand, wanted start-up money for a prostitution ring, Texas Monthly reported. Delgado concocted a story that she had connections to a drug cartel, and she said he would pay him $3,000 in a combination of drugs and cash.

The night of Hatcher’s murder, Paniagua texted Delgado to tell her his devastating news. She texted him back the next morning, offering to bring him groceries or help with anything he needed.

A juror who served on the case puzzled over the murder in a piece written for the Dallas Observer.

“I still don’t understand what makes people do such stupid, cruel things,” wrote Casey Miller. “How does a 23-year-old Dallas woman get talked into planning and completing a murder with someone she has known for one month? When does a dental hygienist student in her 30s become so self-absorbed that she must have the new girlfriend of her ex “eliminated” so they can be reunited and live happily ever after? Why does a train-wreck stoner with three kids of his own think cash, a bag of weed and some cocaine is an even trade for shooting a stranger in the back of the head, execution style?”


Hatcher Was Shot in the Back of the Head & Her Purse Was Stolen to Make

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Donald Trump Jr. says covid-19 deaths are at ‘almost nothing’ on a day when more than 1,000 Americans died

“I went through the CDC data, because I kept hearing about new infections, but I was like, ‘Why aren’t they talking about this?’” Trump Jr. said. “Oh, because the number is almost nothing. Because we’ve gotten control of this thing, we understand how it works. They have the therapeutics to be able to deal with this.“

While medical advances and less-crowded hospitals appear to have reduced the death rate from the early days of the pandemic, scientists warn it’s not clear whether that’s a long-term trend, The Washington Post reported. As cases surge across the U.S., fatalities are often a lagging data point for CDC researchers, and reports can be incomplete in capturing the rate in which people are actually dying from the virus and its complications.

Physicians are also fearful that the latest burst in new cases, including a record 89,940 on Thursday, will lead to a greater number of deaths in the coming weeks, according to the New York Times.

“This is still a high death rate, much higher than we see for flu or other respiratory diseases,” Leora Horwitz, director of NYU Langone’s Center for Healthcare Innovation & Delivery Science, told the Times of the current death rate. “I don’t want to pretend this is benign.”

On Thursday night, though, the president’s eldest son pointed to a post from his Instagram account that he argued painted a more clear picture of the present state of a pandemic that has killed at least 228,000 people in the United States.

“If you look at my Instagram,” he said, “it’s gone to almost nothing.”

At least 1,063 people in the U.S. died of coronavirus on Thursday, the second-highest daily total for October, and 5,668 have died in the last seven days. This week has also featured two consecutive days of more than 1,000 deaths, marking the second time that’s happened in as many weeks, according to The Washington Post’s coronavirus tracker.

The discussion on Fox was sparked by an earlier segment on CNN, when Sanjay Gupta advised President Trump’s supporters not to attend his rallies. Gupta, the network’s chief medical correspondent, reported that new coronavirus cases had increased 82 percent of the time in counties that hosted a total of 17 rallies for the president between August and September. The infection rate in those counties had also climbed at a faster clip than the overall rate for their state, CNN reported.

Gupta then noted that if anyone had been to one of Trump’s outdoor rallies, which have attracted thousands of maskless supporters not adhering to social distancing, they should assume they have been exposed to the coronavirus and quarantine for 14 days.

“Don’t go to these rallies,” Gupta said. “Look, just about anywhere in the country now, if you go to a gathering that’s several hundred people, it’s without a doubt the virus is attending that rally with you.”

On Fox, Ingraham said that Gupta’s words, along with Minnesota’s covid-19 guidelines capping the number of attendees at the president’s planned

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They met in Hawaii and built a life in rural Maryland. This fall, they died two days apart.

When the chief barber retired, Doris took over the first chair. She knew everyone, said her grandson, Jeffrey Grim.

“When she was in the hospital, her respiratory therapist said, ‘Did you cut hair?’ and she was like, ‘Yeah,’ ” Grim recalled in an interview, describing Doris’s hospitalization for covid-19 this summer. The respiratory therapist then said, “ ‘My dad used to take me to you when I was a little boy.’ ”

Doris Bender died of complications of coronavirus on Sept. 3, in Room 4107 of Meritus Medical Center Intensive Care Unit in Robinwood. Jacob had died Sept. 1 in the same hospital, also of covid-19, in Room 4109.

Jacob, who was 83, died at 2:36 p.m.. Doris, who was 81, died at 2:34 p.m.

“Two days apart, two minutes apart, two rooms apart,” said Grim, a PhD candidate at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. “It’s really hard to lose both of them at the same time. My family will never be the same. And they were old, but I think we would have had a lot more years with them, if it wasn’t for covid.”

Grim said he isn’t certain how his grandparents contracted the virus. He remembers that the couple came into contact with someone who had the virus, but tested negative shortly thereafter. In August, Doris began experiencing heart attack-like symptoms.

“When they took her to the hospital, as protocol they did a covid test and found out that it was indeed the covid that was attacking her lungs and heart,” Grim said.

Jacob, who Grim called Pap-Pap, tested positive two days later, on Aug. 14. He was home for two weeks after Doris was hospitalized, but then his condition grew worse.

“All of a sudden, he just went downhill quickly” Grim said. “And we really think that because Grandma was such a caretaker, she wanted to make sure he passed before she was ready to go.”

Grim said that after Doris died, the family found a notebook where she kept count of how many newborn hats she had made for the hospital: 3,241 in all.

Before the pandemic, Doris enjoyed going out to play Bingo with her daughter Theresa on Wednesday nights and playing a Japanese card game called Hanafuda on Sundays, Grim said. She hated staying home during the pandemic, and even called it “jail.”

The couple tended to their garden, where they planted vegetables such as tomatoes, peppers, and squash. Grim said when Doris was in the hospital, the doctors told the family she was delirious and was talking about her cantaloupes being ready. But when Grim visited the garden afterward, he found “two perfectly bright cantaloupes.”

Doris would have turned 82 last week. The family didn’t come together to observe her birthday out of safety concerns. But Grim and his brother, Josh, bought anthuriums, a tropical flower their grandmother loved, to put on her grave.

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Drop in flu deaths may indicate that most at risk died from coronavirus

Flu deaths are down two-thirds from the five-year average, a drop that could indicate the most vulnerable Americans died in the first wave of COVID-19.

New federal estimates show no flu deaths for the week ending Oct. 17. The federal five-year average for the same week is 17 fatalities. New York and New York City recorded no flu deaths, which is also that week’s five-year average for each.

“We are still very early into this influenza season and it’s too early to make any predictions on severity,” Health Department spokesman Michael Lanza told The Post. (iStock)

“We are still very early into this influenza season and it’s too early to make any predictions on severity,” Health Department spokesman Michael Lanza told The Post. (iStock)

The city is taking a wait-and-see attitude, with the flu season just a few weeks old.

“We are still very early into this influenza season and it’s too early to make any predictions on severity,” Health Department spokesman Michael Lanza told The Post.

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A similar pattern is emerging in the UK, where flu and pneumonia took 1,132 lives last month – 28% lower than the five-year monthly average of roughly 1,500.

The country’s Office for National Statistics thinks the drop is because medically vulnerable Brits who would have died this fall from flu and pneumonia instead died this spring from the coronavirus.

But private British statistician Kevin McConway told The Post he doubts “whether it’s the whole story.”

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McConway points out that flu and pneumonia are airborne infections like the coronavirus and the safety guidelines put in place for the pandemic — masks, social distancing and handwashing — would stop them, too.

Said state health department spokesman Jeffrey Hammond: “Wearing masks, social distancing, hand washing, and all the other measures put in place to slow the Coronavirus should also slow the flu and other viruses.”

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US health officials have been urging Americans for months that a bad flu season on top of the COVID outbreak could overwhelm hospitals and increase the risk of catching both infections at the same time.

Pneumonia deaths in the U.S. and across the city and state are down as well. For the week ending Oct. 17, deaths nationwide stood at 1,251 – down 60% from the five-year average of 3,106 for the same week.

The state recorded 93 pneumonia deaths, a 36% decrease from the five-year average of 146 for the same week. The city’s total stood at 51, down the five-year average of 86 — a 41% reduction.

Click for more from NYPost.com.

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Texas woman died of covid-19 on a Spirit Airlines flight from Las Vegas

The woman has not been identified publicly, but the Dallas County Judge’s Office, which first disclosed her death, said she was in her 30s and had an underlying medical condition.

Airport managers in Albuquerque did not learn until later that the woman had covid-19, so the case was handled as a typical medical diversion, Kitts said. Officials in Dallas County added the woman to their virus death toll on Sunday.

“She expired on an interstate airline flight, and did have underlying high risk health conditions,” the county said in a new release updating its tally.

Erik Hofmeyer, a spokesman for Spirit, offered the airline’s condolences to the woman’s family and friends. He said that the airline remains confident in its protocols for handling coronavirus cases and that it works with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on any contact-tracing requests.

“Our Flight Attendants have in-depth training to respond to medical emergencies and utilize several resources, including communicating with our designated on-call medical professionals on the ground, using onboard medical kits and personal protective equipment, and receiving assistance from credentialed medical personnel traveling on the flight,” Hofmeyer said.

It’s unknown how many people where on the flight or whether they were notified that they might have been exposed to the virus.

The CDC has said it has investigated about 1,600 cases of people who traveled while they posed a risk of spreading the coronavirus, identifying 11,000 people who were potentially exposed. It wasn’t immediately clear whether the agency investigated the case of the woman who died on the Spirit flight.

Kitts said the New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator, which handles unusual deaths in the state, responded to the airport. The office could not be reached to comment.

Officials in Dallas initially said the woman died in Arizona, a detail that was widely reported, before confirming that she actually died in New Mexico.

Although it appears to be an extreme case, the woman’s death was disclosed as airlines continue to try to convince potential passengers that flying is safe during the pandemic. Trade organizations have stressed that there have not been confirmed cases of people catching the virus on planes in the United States and that only a few cases have been documented globally.

Nevertheless, passenger numbers continue to be down considerably from normal times as businesses curtail travel and some states impose quarantine requirements on travelers.

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Texas woman died of COVID-19 while on board a plane from Arizona to Texas, officials say

A Texas woman died of COVID-19 while on board a plane from Arizona to Texas, officials said Sunday.

The woman, in her 30s, had difficulty breathing before the plane took off on July 25, according to Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.

“They tried to give her oxygen,” Jenkins said during a briefing. “It was not successful. She died on the jetway.”

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County officials knew a Garland resident had died in July, Jenkins told WFAA, but only recently received an autopsy report from an Arizona medical examiner that listed the virus as the cause of death.


“We don’t know a whole lot,” Jenkins said. “We may not know if she was aware she was sick.”

The woman, who has not been identified, had underlying high risk health conditions, according to a news release.

Jenkins said he did not have information on which airline the woman was traveling with, WFAA reported.

On Monday, Dallas officials announced 382 new coronavirus cases, bringing the total to 90,318 confirmed cases and 1,085 deaths.

Across the state, 2,273 cases and eight new deaths were reported, for a total of 828,527 cases and 17,022 deaths. As of Monday, 4,319 Texans were hospitalized for the coronavirus.

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All 62 residents at Kansas nursing home have COVID, 10 have died

Topeka, Kansas — A coronavirus outbreak has killed 10 residents in a Kansas nursing home, and the local health department said every one of the residents had tested positive for COVID-19 as of Monday, along with an unspecified number of staff. The affected home is in northwest Kansas’ Norton County, which has seen one of the largest proportional increases in confirmed coronavirus cases over two weeks in the country.
 
The Norton County health department confirmed Monday night that all 62 residents and some employees at the Andbe Home in Norton had tested positive for the novel coronavirus. The agency also said one Andbe Home resident was hospitalized, while the remaining 51 were being treated at the home. 

PRESS RELEASE

Posted by Norton County Health Department and Home Health on Monday, October 19, 2020

It was not clear how many were experiencing symptoms of the disease, which is known to hit the elderly hardest.
 
The local health department said residents were being quarantined in their rooms and the home was not allowing outside visitors.
 
The outbreak at the nursing home came after the state Department of Health and Environment last week reported more than 100 cases at the state’s prison in Norton over the two weeks ending Wednesday.

andbe-home-norton-kansas-covid.jpg
A screenshot from Google’s Street View shows the Andbe Home nursing and care home in Norton County, Kansas. 

Google


Kansas is seeing an average of more than 700 new confirmed and probable coronavirus cases a day, its largest numbers since early March.

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Texas woman died of coronavirus ‘on the jetway’ on flight from Arizona

A Texas woman in her 30s died of Covid-19 while flying home from Arizona this summer, officials said Monday.

Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins told NBC Dallas-Fort Worth that the woman died in July, but that officials just learned of her official cause of death.

“It became difficult for her to breathe, and they tried to give her oxygen,” he told the station. “It was not successful. She died on the jetway.”

The woman, who was from the Dallas suburb of Garland, had underlying health conditions, according to a Dallas County news release. Additional information about her was not immediately available.

The disclosure comes as case counts continued to rise in 25 states, according to a 14-day average maintained by the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center. The data showed that new cases jumped in Texas last week after a dip the week before.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has continued relaxing coronavirus restrictions, with an executive order earlier this month allowing some bars to reopen at half capacity.

Jenkins criticized the move Monday, saying it can make people believe it’s safe to have friends over.

“We keep jumping the gun, and it puts us back in a situation which hurts public health and businesses and schools,” he told NBC Dallas-Fort Worth.

Experts have warned of a possible “third peak” of coronavirus cases as the holidays approach with what Dr. Carlos del Rio, an infectious diseases expert at the Emory University School of Medicine, described as six possible superspreader events.

“We can see a lot of disease happening,” he said.

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