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fitness

Builder, 45, dies in prison days before facing trial for murdering fitness trainer girlfriend

Builder, 45, dies in prison days before facing trial for murdering his ‘beautiful and kind’ ex-army fitness trainer girlfriend, 26

  • Terence Papworth was charged with murder of Amy-Leanne Stringfellow in June
  • The mother-of-one was found critically injured at his flat in Doncaster on June 5
  • Papworth, 45, a builder, was due to face trial over Amy’s death on November 30 
  • He was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison in Leeds on Sunday, November 22 

A builder has died in prison days before he was due stand trial for the alleged murder of his ‘beautiful and kind’ girlfriend.

Terence Papworth, 45, was charged with the murder of mother-of-one Amy-Leanne Stringfellow, 26, in June.

Ms Stringfellow, who served in Afghanistan, was found critically injured in Papworth’s home in Balby, Doncaster, South Yorkshire, on June 5 this year.

Emergency services battled to save the fitness trainer, but she was declared dead at the scene.

Papworth was charged with her murder two days later and was due to stand trial next week.

However, he was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison, in Leeds, West Yorkshire, on Sunday.

Terence Papworth, 45, was charged with the murder of mum-of-one Amy-Leanne Stringfellow, 26, in June and was due to stand trial later this month

He was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison, in Leeds, West Yorkshire, on Sunday ahead of the trial, following Amy's (pictured) death

Terence Papworth (pictured left), 45, was charged with the murder of mum-of-one Amy-Leanne Stringfellow (pictured right), 26, in June and was due to stand trial later this month. He was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison, in Leeds, West Yorkshire, on Sunday

Papworth was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison (pictured), in Leeds, West Yorkshire, on Sunday

Papworth was found dead in his cell at Armley Prison (pictured), in Leeds, West Yorkshire, on Sunday

Papworth had recently appeared in court via video link for a case management hearing and was due to stand trial on November 30 at Sheffield Crown Court.

The Ministry of Justice said: ‘Terence Papworth died in HMP Leeds on 22 November.

‘The Prisons and Probation Ombudsman has been informed.’

Papworth and Ms Stringfellow, who has a young daughter, had been in a relationship since last October but they had not moved in together.

She had travelled the four miles from her home in Doncaster to see Papworth during lockdown.

After her death, South Yorkshire Police referred itself to the Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC) over prior contact they had with Ms Stringfellow.

Private Stringfellow enlisted in the Army in 2010 and completed assignments with 3rd Battalion the Rifles 3 RIFLES in Edinburgh and Chilwell.

She also served a tour of duty in Afghanistan in 2012 as part of the Operation Herrick 16 deployment.

Amy-Leanne Stringfellow, 26, was found critically injured at a house in Doncaster in June. She died a short while later, despite efforts to save her

Amy-Leanne Stringfellow, 26, was found critically injured at a house in Doncaster in June. She died a short while later, despite efforts to save her

Papworth was charged with murder and appeared at Doncaster Magistrates' Court in June. He was due to stand trial on November 30

Papworth was charged with murder and appeared at Doncaster Magistrates’ Court in June. He was due to stand trial on November 30

Amy had been promoted to Lance Corporal but was discharged before taking up the post.

The fitness fanatic rejoined as a Volunteer Reservist in 2017 and also worked as a personal trainer.

Tributes

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fitness

Over 620,000 students from 600 schools commit to 30 minutes of activity for 30 days for Dubai Fitness Challenge

(MENAFN – Emirates News Agency (WAM)) DUBAI, 21st November, 2020 (WAM) — Recognising the integral role that schools play in instilling fitness-focused habits in the country’s youth, Dubai Fitness Challenge, DFC, 2020 is ensuring that more than 620,000 students across 600 schools adopt healthier and happier lifestyles for 30 minutes for 30 days.

The fitness programme of free events, sports activities and family-friendly virtual sessions will continue throughout the month, while a new robust library of free online resources for parents and teachers will further, enable them to motivate children to get fit while having fun. Exciting activity calendars can be downloaded for free on the DFC website, catering to various learning models with over 80 fitness and wellbeing-focused activity templates and games for children aged two to 16 years. For an extra boost at home, kids can also join their beloved superheroes and cartoon characters in online workouts, wellness and dance sessions for free, easy-to-follow exercises and routines.

Dr. Abdulla Al Karam, Chairman of the Board of Directors and Director-General of the Knowledge and Human Development Authority, KHDA, commented, “More than any other time, this year has shown us how important it is to be fit and healthy; to have fun and to spend time with friends and family. The Dubai Fitness Challenge brings all these values together. It’s been great to see so many schools and families get together online to build on existing fitness habits and to start new ones. We are grateful to the team at Dubai Tourism for bringing us all together and for giving us a challenge we can all rise to.”

Ahmed Al Khaja, CEO of Dubai Festivals and Retail Establishment, DFRE, commented, “For children and young people, the importance of physical activity can never be understated. Now, more than ever, sports, exercise and wellness activities are crucial to inspiring sustained shifts towards more active routines for children.”

Little ones can choose from an incredible range of free workouts that the whole family will love – be it exclusive workout videos from PJ Masks that are released each week throughout DFC; fun workouts with all the favourite characters from IMG Worlds Of Adventure; Les Mills Born To Move music workouts; FIFA and EA workouts, with drills and tricks by Kotaro Tokuda – the youngest freestyle football champion; or special song routines with Papa Smurfs, Brainy Smurf, Smurfette and Vanity Smurf at Motiongate Dubai.

To make 30 minutes of daily exercise fun for the whole family, DFC’s flagship Fitness Villages also promise something for everyone. You can head down to the Mai Dubai Fitness Village Festival City Mall and experience bag jumps, quick flights and the region’s largest mobile pump track at The Arch. Go to the DP World Fitness Village Kite Beach and try out trampoline workouts at Fitbit Rebounder; boot camps, dance classes and functional training at the Teen Fit area; or monkey bars and climbing challenges at the Kids Camp. Enjoy a day out at the park with the Emirates NBD

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medicine

Jane Seymour talks financial and personal struggles on ‘Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman’ in the early days

Jane Seymour spoke candidly about the financial and emotional crisis she was in during the early days of her hit show, “Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman.” 

The actress starred as the title character on the CBS series for six seasons. It followed the adventures of a physician from Boston who sets out for adventure in the American west, ultimately settling in Colorado Springs. 

Speaking to Entertainment Tonight, Seymour explained that she initially took the role out of desperation after a past relationship left her in crushing debt. 

JANE SEYMOUR, 69, POSES IN SPORTS BRA TO ENCOURAGE HER FANS TO SHARE POSITIVITY AND ENCOURAGEMENT

“The first thing I remember is that my ex-husband at that time had lost all our money, left me nine million in the red with lawsuits from every major bank,” she told the outlet. “I was homeless, penniless and I called my agent and said I would do anything. He called the networks, and they said, how about a little movie of the week? But she has to sign for five years in case it becomes a series, she has to start tomorrow morning — less than 12 hours from now — and that was it.”

Jane Seymour explained how an off-screen romance affected her on-screen character.

Jane Seymour explained how an off-screen romance affected her on-screen character.
(REUTERS/Monica Almeida)

The actress, now 69, said that the paycheck she received from the show helped her get back on her feet financially, and having a regular job helped her be a mother to her kids while putting a roof over their heads. However, with her professional problems solved, personal ones crept up. 

JANE SEYMOUR TURNS 69 — THE ‘DR. QUINN’ STAR REVEALS HER SECRETS TO AGING GRACEFULLY: ‘NOBODY BELIEVES IT’

The actress attributes the success of the show to her co-star, Joe Lando, who she noted was likely a big draw for women who tuned into the show. However, an off-screen relationship between the on-screen couple complicated things behind-the-scenes. 

“Never fall in love with your leading man in the pilot and then break up before they pick it up,” she explained. “We fell madly in love, ran off to Bora Bora, he realized that everyone recognized me even in the middle of nowhere and that wasn’t going to work. So, that was it. And then they picked up our show. So, all that sexual tension you saw, it was real!”

Jane Seymour talked about the early days of 'Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman.'

Jane Seymour talked about the early days of ‘Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman.’
(Photo by Rich Polk/Getty Images for IMDb)

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She told the outlet that things got extra complicated when she married regular series director James Keach.

“He had to direct Joe and I making out,” she noted.

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Fortunately, she says she and Lando are now close friends.

Source Article

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fitness

I tried Garmin’s new fitness smartwatch that holds 6 days of battery life

Our team is dedicated to finding and telling you more about the products and deals we love. If you love them too and decide to purchase through the links below, we may receive a commission. Pricing and availability are subject to change.

Running wasn’t always a passion of mine. I picked it up when I moved to New York City just after college as a way to blow off steam while discovering my new neighborhood. Five years later, it still is a great stress reliever — and there’s still plenty of ground to see here. But I often run the same paths when I’m short on time and even with a good playlist, it can get a little boring.

One way I keep myself motivated to run is by competing with myself by using a fitness tracker, whether its an app on my phone or a wearable watch. So when the Garmin Venu Sq. launched in September 2020, I had to check it out.

Also available at Walmart.

The Venu Sq. is Garmin’s latest fitness tracker, but it looks and operates more like a smartwatch. While Garmin has running watches for serious racers, this is one is more for your everyday athlete looking to track overall wellness, not just workouts.

It has a crisp LCD watch screen with a rubber athletic band that adjusts comfortably to your wrist. Admittedly, it looks very similar to my Apple watch, only more advanced health and wellness features.

Wellness features

For starters, the watch is a 24/7 health monitor, meant to be worn both day and night. Each morning when you wake up, the watch will provide you with your personal “Body Battery” score, which is an energy monitoring scale from one to 100. This tells you how much energy you got after sleeping, and while the goal is to rest and wake up with 100, it’s likely it will differ for each person. After my usual weekday 6–7 hour sleep, I wake up with a score generally in the high 90s. On the weekends, I strive for 100.

Its pulse rate/heart rate sensors are the same ones you’ll find on Garmin’s $2,000-plus advanced smart watches. The tracker samples your heart rate every second, and based on Heart Rate Varied, it will calculate your stress levels.

You can also use the smartwatch to track hydration, respiration, menstrual cycle, steps and of course, calories burned and workouts.

Credit: Ellie Conley for In The Know

Fitness Features

Garmin is famous for its GPS, and obviously the Venu Sq. has one built-in. I find the watch’s GPS is often more reliable than my phone for tracking an accurate running distance, which is important when you’re training for a race, trying to be consistent or trying to beat your last long distance.

The Garmin Venu. Sq. also comes preloaded with 20-plus built-in sports apps for tracking and analyzing activities like running, walking, cycling, swimming, golf and even mindful breathing. You can also follow along to preloaded

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fitness

For Three Days, November 16-18, the Entire Global Industry Convenes to Collaborate on Re-Defining the Future of Fitness Virtually

Questex’s Club Industry and Sibec join forces with major global industry organizations and over 80 key leaders to host the Future of Fitness, a virtual event that spans Asia, Europe, Latin America, UK and the United States to a path of reinvention and relevance

NEW YORK, Nov. 10, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The health and wellness industry must reinvent itself to survive and thrive in what had once been a strictly brick and mortar industry. Questex Wellness’ Club Industry and Sibec are joining forces to host the Future of Fitness, a free three-day virtual event that will help guide health and wellness professionals in Asia, Europe, Latin America, the United Kingdom and the United States to a path of reinvention and relevance for the future. The Future of Fitness will take place November 16-18. Register here.

“2020 was an unprecedented year in many ways, causing profound changes in the way we view ourselves, our businesses, our community and how we do business. Our industry has forever changed, and now we have the opportunity to reimage, reinvent and rejuvenate our industry. This event addresses how to do that,” said Marty McCallen, Director, Club Industry. “Today, we have more than 2,500 global health and wellness industry professionals registered to attend the event. As a partner to the industry, we’re pleased to be able to provide our community with ideas and strategies that will help them thrive during this turbulent time.”

The more than 40 presentations, panels, and live Q&As from over 80 speakers will dive into the most pressing topics in the industry, including: the lasting effects of COVID-19; what members want from their health clubs; technology impacting the industry; the business case for diversity; cleaning protocols; leadership in a time of crisis and how to rebuild the fitness industry’s reputation.

The event includes two keynote presentations:

  • David Stalker, President of EuropeActive and CEO of Myzone EMEA, will share how the fitness industry can influence government strategies at a local level.

  • Liz Bohannon, founder and CEO of Sseko Designs, will present strategies to crush disruption in the health club industry.

Speakers from across the world will be a part of the event, including:

  • Chuck Runyon, Self Esteem Brands

  • Bill McBride, Active Wellness

  • Todd Magazine, Blink Fitness

  • Greta Wagner, Chelsea Piers Management

  • Gale Landers, Fitness Formula Club

  • Joe Cirulli, Gainesville Health & Fitness

  • Adam Zeitsiff, Intelivideo, Inc.

  • Martin Seibold, LifeFit Group (Germany, Benelux, Asia and Australia)

  • Chris Clawson, Life Fitness

  • Blair McHaney, MXM

  • Kate Golden, Newtown Athletic Club

  • Paul Bedford, Retention Guru (UK)

  • JoAnna Masloski, Wellbridge

Major industry associations and outlets are working with Club Industry and Sibec on the event. UKActive and EuropeActive have provided speakers beyond David Stalker, the first-day keynoter. In addition, EuropeActive Board Member Jennifer Halsall, who also is international retention and member engagement manager for Basic-Fit, will participate in a panel on virtual fitness as well as the Ask the Experts about the Future of the Fitness Industry panel.

IHRSA is also

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health

US sees the five highest days of Covid-19 leading up to election

The United States reported the five highest days of Covid-19 cases right up to election, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.



a person wearing a blue hat: BOSTON, MA - OCTOBER 22: An RN hands off a coronavirus sample to medical assistant Bettie Cleveland at a COVID-19 testing site set up by Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center at Prince Hall Grand Lodge in Grove Hall in Boston's Dorchester on Oct. 22, 2020. Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center set up mobile testing to help their community members who were disproportionally affected by COVID-19, the neighborhoods of Dorchester, Roxbury and Mattapan have seen some of the highest incident rates of the Coronavirus in Boston. In July of 2020 they began to administer tests in the city at various locations. The Grove Hall location is available for walk up testing every Thursday at the Prince Hall Grand Lodge from 10:00am - 3:00 PM. (Photo by Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)


© Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe/Getty Images
BOSTON, MA – OCTOBER 22: An RN hands off a coronavirus sample to medical assistant Bettie Cleveland at a COVID-19 testing site set up by Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center at Prince Hall Grand Lodge in Grove Hall in Boston’s Dorchester on Oct. 22, 2020. Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center set up mobile testing to help their community members who were disproportionally affected by COVID-19, the neighborhoods of Dorchester, Roxbury and Mattapan have seen some of the highest incident rates of the Coronavirus in Boston. In July of 2020 they began to administer tests in the city at various locations. The Grove Hall location is available for walk up testing every Thursday at the Prince Hall Grand Lodge from 10:00am – 3:00 PM. (Photo by Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

The figures represent the highest number of reported cases since the pandemic began. Tuesday ranked fourth with about 85,200 reported cases, the data showed.

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Last Friday, the US reported 99,321 new cases — the highest single day number of infections recorded for any country. And at least 31 states set daily infection records in October.

Escalating case numbers point to a continuing fall surge across the country, setting grim records. Coronavirus is forecast to take tens of thousands more lives across the country in the coming months.

Experts have warned this bout with the virus will be the worst one yet — and alarming trends are already pointing in that direction. In just one month, the country’s 7-day case average nearly doubled.

Hospitalizations are also surging, with the number of patients nationwide rising by more than 10,000 in just two weeks, according to data from the Covid Tracking Project. Hospitals in some parts of the country have hit their “breaking point,” according to emergency medicine physician Dr. Leana Wen.

Hospital officials in El Paso, Texas, are now preparing to open the city’s civic center as an overflow medical facility and add a fourth mobile morgue. In Arkansas, Bo Ryall, president and CEO of the Arkansas Hospital Association, said there is a shortage of health care workers caused by fatigue, competition from other states, increasing costs and community exposure.

And when hospitalizations climb, deaths are likely to follow, doctors have warned.

The virus’ spread changed the way Americans cast their votes, as tens of millions of people voted early by mail or prior to Election Day. People recovering from Covid-19 or quarantining from being exposed to the virus were able vote, a spokesman for the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told CNN.

As of Tuesday afternoon, the US reported 9.3 million cases of the virus and more than 232,000 people have died, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

Researchers from the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation project that 399,163 Americans could lose

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health

U.S. adds 81K COVID-19 cases; more than 260K sickened over last 3 days

Nov. 2 (UPI) — The United States has added more than a quarter-million new COVID-19 cases over the last three days — by far the largest national three-day tally of the pandemic. About 2,300 patients died.

According to updated data from Johns Hopkins University, 81,500 cases were reported Sunday — the most ever recorded for a Sunday, when figures are typically lower because of slower reporting over the weekend.

The United States obliterated its single-day record on Friday with almost 100,000 new cases. The three-day total ending Sunday was about 262,000. The five-day total is about 430,000 and the seven-day total close to 570,000.

There were also about 450 new deaths on Sunday, according to Johns Hopkins. More than 6,000 patients have died of the virus in the United States over the past week.

Since the start of the pandemic, there have been 9.21 million cases and 231,000 deaths nationwide.

With the disease surging in the Midwest, hospitalizations nationwide are close to 50,000, according to the COVID Tracking Project.

In Iowa, state health officials have seen seven straight days of increases of seriously ill patients. The state has averaged more than 2,000 new cases per day, a record high.

In Wisconsin, officials say a record number of patients are receiving hospital care, with about a fifth of them in intensive care. Several patients are being treated at a newly created field hospital at the Wisconsin State Fair Park.

The state saw a record number of new cases over the weekend. Wisconsin’s positivity rate is about 19%.

Source Article

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health

I Tried, Desperately, to Grow a Mustache for 30 Days. Here’s What I Learned.

From Men’s Health

I ONCE SPENT three weeks in my early 20s actively trying to increase the fullness of my beard. My plan did not involve taking supplements or applying creams, but more drastic measures: a steady diet of scotch and Clint Eastwood movies.

Despite all the Macallan single malt and Dirty Harry, my beard didn’t grow any fuller—sideburns still disconnected, hairless patches still dappling my face.

So I shaved off my “beard,” and figured, hey, maybe everything would grow in by my 30s.

Photo credit: Men's Health
Photo credit: Men’s Health

Then this thing called Movember started to take off. Although the initiative began in 2003, it wasn’t until 2009 that the organization’s partnership with Livestrong helped push Movember into the U.S. mainstream.

Some of my friends were growing mustaches around that time, but more for the novelty, it seemed, than for raising awareness and money for prostate cancer prevention, one of Movember’s now-many causes. Even if I had wanted to join them, whatever the motivation, I felt like I couldn’t. I was facial hair challenged, scotch whisky be damned.

It took me 12 years before I decided to challenge my fate (Do you feel lucky, punk?) again, when Men’s Health Digital Director Mike Darling asked me in September of this year if there was anything I wanted to contribute to Movember efforts.

I can contribute that I can’t contribute, I told him. Raising awareness about men who can’t grow a mustache for Movember would be my story. I’d conduct my experiment during the month of October so that I could have the results ready to by the start of Movember.

Mike liked the idea, but Mike was probably just happy he didn’t have to grow a mustache for Movember. Who I really needed to like my idea was my wife, Meghan.

So I did the smart thing and marked October 1 on our shared Google Calendar with the notification “START GROWING A MUSTACHE” and then avoided the topic until late September. It was a nice night and the family was in a good mood. We had just finished dinner on our back patio when I broke the news.

It’s not that Meghan is staunchly anti-beard. She’s just staunchly anti my beard, which she refers to affectionately as “patchy bullshit.” If I don’t shave for a few days, I’ll notice that she’ll curl her lip and draw back her face when I attempt to kiss her. It’s her way of saying, “I love your insides, but your outsides are currently grotesque.”

And her opinion on mustaches, specifically?

“Ah GOD, are you kidding me?” she said that late-September night. “A whole month? You’re kidding me, right? Can you even grow a mustache? It’s going to look terrible. You’re kidding. I know you’re kidding. I’m not going to kiss you, you know that? Are you okay with us not kissing for an entire month?”

I had already elected to do it, and I was determined to make the best of

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health

130+ Days Hospitalized And Often Near Death

EAST HAVEN, CT — “Just let me go,” John Ormond told his daughter on the phone.

“When he said, ‘Just let me go,’ I knew it was out of desperation,” said Savonna Ormond, the assistant director of nursing for Whispering Pines Rehabilitation and Nursing Center. “I knew it was him suffering at the moment. I knew it wasn’t about anything else. You know when you’re in those situations, it’s easy to give up. But I wasn’t giving up on him.”

And, it turns out, he was not ready to either. He had a lot to live for. And so, for more than four months, he fought to stay alive, with help from doctors and nurses at Yale New Haven Hospital’s St. Raphael campus.

And when Ormond finally awakened fully, he didn’t know what had happened. He told Patch he has virtually no memory of those many months on a ventilator. If he knew he was close to death, he has no memory of that. In fact, he said, “When I came out of it, I didn’t know where I was. I asked what happened. What day it was. It was August. All I knew I went in into the hospital in April.”

But one thing he does remember vividly is seeing a quote from the Bible on a wall. Whether it was there or not, he doesn’t know, but it was John, 3:16, he said: “For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.”

So he prayed. And he survived COVID-19 after being in the hospital for 132 days.

On April 6, it was confirmed that six people had died at Whispering Pines. East Haven’s mayor said at the time there were a number of positive cases, including staff members.

One of those nursing home workers was then-66-year-old John Ormond. Working at the nursing home part time after retiring from a long career as a master machinist by trade, Ormond, father of five and grandfather of seven, contracted the virus that causes COVID-19.

When Ormond arrived at St. Raphael’s on April 4 with a fever, stomach pain, body aches and hypoxia — a condition that happens when your body doesn’t get enough oxygen — he’d already had the COVID-19 test, but it wasn’t until he went to the emergency room that he found out his test was positive. Within hours, he was admitted to the intensive care unit.

Ormond would remain hospitalized — almost continuously on a ventilator, and then, in an induced coma — for many months.

His daughter the nurse said, “I knew that if he got this sickness — you know we saw on the news all the time — but I knew that if he got this, it would be a long road. I never thought I would lose him, but I knew it would be a long road.”

On April 9, he was intubated and placed

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health

Slovakia tested most of the country in two days. Here’s how they did it and what they found

The European country decided to embark on the gargantuan quest to test everyone over the age of 10 after Covid-19 cases started spiking last month. Dubbed operation “Joint responsibility,” the program was the first attempt at large-scale blanket testing in Europe.

Just over 1% of those taking part tested positive, about 38,359 people in total, according to the official website of the program.

The program was first piloted on October 23 in Orava and Bardejov, two regions with the highest number of Covid-19 cases in the country. Nearly 141,000 people, 91% of those who were eligible, got tested in the two regions over the three days of the pilot.

In the rest of the country, the testing took place simultaneously on Saturday and Sunday. The government encouraged everyone older than 10 to take part in the voluntary program. People older than 65 years who spend most of their time at home, people with disabilities, cancer patients, immunocompromised people and other vulnerable groups were exempt.

Mike Tildesley, an infectious disease modeling expert at the University Warwick and a UK government scientific adviser, said that effective mass testing could be used in the long term as an alternative to lockdown to control the spread of disease.

“However, it is important to realize that just because someone tests negative it does not mean that they will necessarily be free from infection a few days later,” he said. “So any mass testing strategy needs to be carried out at regular intervals (every few days) in order to be an effective strategy and to allow some lockdown measures to be relaxed.”

The government said it was considering running a second round of the mass testing later this month, but no decision has been made yet.

The Slovak program used rapid antigen tests which provide results in minutes. Unlike the molecular diagnostic (PCR) tests, antigen tests don’t have to be processed in a lab, so they are faster and cheaper. But they can also be less reliable. While the PCR tests look for the virus’ genetic material, the antigen test looks for pieces of protein from the virus.

The Slovak military has been in charge of the testing campaign which required the deployment of 40,463 staff, including 14,500 health workers and 6,319 soldiers, to nearly 5,000 testing locations across the country.

The testing was voluntary, but those who decided to skip it will have to continue comply with stricter coronavirus restrictions and will not be allowed to leave their homes unless they are carrying out one of a few narrowly-defined exempt activities until Sunday.
The number of older people getting coronavirus in Europe is rising again. That's really bad news

Those who tested negative no longer have to comply with the strictest restrictions as long as they can prove their negative status with an official certificate. People who tested positive now have to quarantine — either at home, or in one of dozens of designated hotels across the country.

Slovakia’s Prime Minister Igor Matovic on Sunday praised those who were involved in the program. “Village and city mayors, civil servants, village or

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