damages

dentist

Fire damages Stamford dentist’s office



a double door in a room: A Friday afternoon fire damaged a dental office on Hoyt Street, according to Capt. Philip Hayes. Smoke and fire damage was contained to a kitchen break room and two adjacent examination rooms


© Stamford Fire Department Photo

A Friday afternoon fire damaged a dental office on Hoyt Street, according to Capt. Philip Hayes. Smoke and fire damage was contained to a kitchen break room and two adjacent examination rooms


STAMFORD — A Friday afternoon fire damaged a dental office on Hoyt Street, according to Capt. Philip Hayes.

At 1:21 p.m., Stamford firefighters were dispatched to a report of “something on fire in the building,” he said.

“Engine 5 and Rescue 1 from the Woodside firehouse arrived on scene in under four minutes to find smoke showing from the rear of the building on the first floor,” Hayes said in a statement.

Loading...

Load Error

“A hose line was stretched and extinguished a fire that originated in a kitchen break room located in a dentist office on the first floor. Additional fire units advanced a second hose line to the second floor, inspected for fire extension, and ventilated smoke from the second floor and attic space,” Hayes said.

“Smoke and fire damage was contained to the room of fire origin, and two adjacent examination rooms,” Hayes said.

There were no civilian or firefighter injuries.

The first-alarm fire response consisted of four engine companies, one truck company, one rescue company, a deputy chief and a safety officer for a total of 27 firefighters.

The fire was declared under control in 20 minutes.

The cause of the fire is under investigation by the Stamford Fire Marshal’s Office.

Continue Reading

Source Article

Read More
health

Viral load may predict ventilator need, death risk; coronavirus damages red blood cells

By Nancy Lapid

(Reuters) – The following is a roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus.

Viral load predicts need for ventilator, death risk

When COVID-19 patients are admitted to the hospital because of pneumonia, doctors can estimate their risk of needing mechanical breathing support or dying based on their “viral load” – the amount of virus genetic material obtained by swabbing the back of the nose and throat, a new study suggests.

“This risk can be predicted regardless of how sick they are when they are admitted, what other comorbidities they may have, their age or how many days they had symptoms,” coauthor Dr. Ioannis Zacharioudakis of NYU School of Medicine told Reuters. His team studied 314 patients, dividing them into three groups according to viral load upon hospital admission.

The group with highest viral levels had 59% higher odds of becoming critically ill or dying than the lowest viral load group. The data, published on Friday in Annals of the American Thoracic Society, “will have practical implications in our ability to judge which patients will benefit the most from early escalation of care, treatment with antivirals and/or inclusion in trials of new therapeutics,” Zacharioudakis said. (https://bit.ly/3oJijtQ)

Coronavirus damages red blood cell membranes

The new coronavirus damages the membranes of oxygen-carrying red blood cells, contributing to the hypoxemia, or low blood concentrations of oxygen, common in COVID-19, researchers have found. Signs of hypoxemia can range from shortness of breath to organ and tissue damage. Studying blood samples from COVID-19 patients and healthy individuals, researchers found the virus did not appear to affect red cells’ ability to pick up oxygen and deliver it throughout the body.

But patients had “clear damage” to red cell membranes, in particular to a membrane protein responsible for helping the cell survive injuries. As a result, patients’ red cells might be more vulnerable to so-called oxidative stress and other injury, coauthor Angelo D’Alessandro of the University of Colorado Denver said in an email.

Red cells circulate for up to 120 days before the body replaces them with new ones, and they cannot synthesize new components to replace the damaged parts. This might help explain why some COVID-19 symptoms can last for months, D’Alessandro said. (https://bit.ly/3mMBq4A)

Pandemic exacts toll on ER doctors’ mental health

COVID-19 is taking a toll on emergency physicians’ mental health and many are reluctant to seek help, according to poll results reported at the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) annual meeting. Among a nationally representative group of 862 U.S. emergency physicians, 87% reported feeling more stressed since the pandemic began and 72% reported more burnout.

More than 80% cited concern for their own health and safety, and the safety of their family and friends, around contracting COVID-19. Nearly half said they are uncomfortable seeking mental health services, 73% said there was at least some stigma to seeking these services

Read More