cutting

health

Cape Cod Hospital Cutting Midwife Services

HYANNIS, MA — Cape Cod Healthcare is cutting hours at its midwifery program in half.

The Massachusetts Nurses Association has decried the decision and said its coming at a time when the hospital is seeing an increase in the number of babies it’s delivering. Starting on Nov. 16, midwives will only be available at the hospital 7 p.m. to 7 a.m., Monday through Friday, cutting their in-hospital weekday availability in half, a spokesperson for the Massachusetts Nurses Association said. With the cuts, midwives, will only be available 24 hours a day on weekends.

Patch has reached out to Cape Cod Healthcare officials and will update this story when we hear back.

From April to September, the hospital has seen a 38.32 percent increase in baby deliveries compared to the same months in 2019.

“The absence of midwives during weekday shifts means that expectant mothers who have chosen to be under the care of a midwife will no longer have access to those same care providers during their labor and delivery — unless a soon-to-be mother is lucky enough to go into labor either at night or on a weekend,” a Massachusetts Nurses Association spokesperson said in a statement. “Otherwise, new babies will be delivered by obstetricians.”

The nurse’s association credits the influx of pregnant woman at Cape Cod Hospital to the closure of Falmouth Hospital’s maternity ward in April. The closure forced expectant mothers in the upper Cape to travel to Hyannis for maternity services.

courtesy of the Massachusetts Nurses Association
courtesy of the Massachusetts Nurses Association

Nurses and residents argued closing the facility reduces access for expectant mothers, putting them and their children in danger. But the Falmouth Hospital Association, a part of the Cape Cod Healthcare network, argued there will be no negative impact from closing the wards in a plan submitted to the Massachusetts Department of Public Health

“Services at Cape Cod Hospital meet or exceed those which are available at the (Falmouth) Hospital, both before the proposed closure and otherwise,” the plan read.

Nurses argued the new cuts at Cape Cod Hospital raise questions on if pregnant women on the Cape will get the appropriate level of care they need, especially since the region has seen its population increase during the coronavirus pandemic as people look to relocate from more densely populated cities and towns.

“When CCHC closed the maternity unit at Falmouth, we knew we would see a significant increase in deliveries in Hyannis,” nurse Michelle Walsh said “At the very least we have been expecting to deliver 300 more babies this year. Little did we know that CCHC would make things worse by cutting patients’ access to midwives at a time when the Cape’s lone maternity unit is already understaffed and overwhelmed.”

This article originally appeared on the Barnstable-Hyannis Patch

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health

Masks Good, Ventilation Better at Cutting COVID Risk at Indoor Events: Study | Top News

BERLIN (Reuters) – Face masks and limits on numbers are important, but good ventilation technology is the most essential ingredient of all in reducing the risk of the coronavirus spreading at public events indoors, according to a German study.

And researchers say the study’s results have implications for containing the epidemic among the broader population too.

Around 1,500 volunteers with face masks, hand sanitiser and proximity trackers attended an indoor pop-concert in Leipzig in August to assess how the virus spreads in large gatherings.

Reseachers simulated three scenarios with varying numbers of spectators and social-distancing standards, and created a computer model of the arena to analyse the flow of aerosols from infected virtual spectators.

“The most important finding for us was understanding how crucial it is to have good ventilation technology. This is key to lowering the risk of infection,” said Stefan Moritz, leader of the RESTART-19 study at the University Medical School in Halle.

The study also found that reducing venue capacity, having multiple arena entrances and seating spectators can have a major impact on the number of contacts people accumulate.

Its recommendations include only allowing food to be eaten at seats, open-air waiting areas, mask-wearing for the concert’s duration and employing stewards to make sure people stick to hygiene rules.

Researchers also developed an epidemiological model to analyse the impact of staging an event on the spread of the virus among the broader population.

They found hygiene measures such as mask-wearing and social-distancing should remain in place as long as the pandemic persists, while seating plans and number of guests should be adjusted based on the incidence of the virus.

“Events have the potential to fuel the epidemic by spreading pathogens, but if a hygiene concept is stuck to then the risk is very low,” said Rafael Mikolajczyk, from Halle University’s Institute for Medical Epidemiology.

The study’s results have not yet been peer-reviewed.

(Reporting by Caroline Copley; editing by John Stonestreet)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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fitness

Michigan City middle school celebrates new $100K fitness center with virtual ribbon cutting | Michigan City News

“Thanks for bringing this to the state of Indiana to help students here, Hoosiers here focus on fitness and health and their wellness,” Gov. Eric Holcomb said in the recent video ribbon cutting. “Obviously it’s important every year, but it could not be more important right now.”

Michigan City staff appeared alongside representatives from the two other Indiana middle schools and sponsors from funding partners, Coca-Cola, Anthem Foundation, Nike and Wheels Up.

Speakers shared their own experiences with youth fitness and encouraged students today to pursue “an upward spiral of success” through healthy workout habits.

“This isn’t a Democrat or Republican issue, this is a kids issue,” Steinfeld said. “This is a kids issue. We as adults need to leave this great country of ours better than we found it and that’s why now we are all a part of this great DON’T QUIT! family.”


Michigan City schools prepare for October return to in-person learning

Krueger students, who have been learning remotely for the start of the 2020-21 school year, are likely to get their first peek at the new fitness equipment when Michigan City Area Schools transition to in-person learning next week.

About 70% of the district’s students have opted to return in person, while others will be allowed to continue remote learning.

“I’m not a big emotional guy, but man, that really, for our kids, it’s big,” physical education teacher Ryan Labis said at the Krueger ribbon cutting. “What this will do for our kids and our community is beyond words.”

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