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Fitness is critical to US military readiness – Opinion

OPINION

Fitness is critical to US military readiness


As President-elect Joe Biden prepares to take office in January, he is rightfully steering the bulk of his efforts toward the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. However, despite our internal battle against this relenting virus, global events continue to swirl around us and will test the new president and his administration. In order to meet those challenges, we need to ensure our military force is at its peak strength and that starts at the ground level with recruiting men and women who can withstand the physical rigor required of all branches of the armed services.


Unfortunately, there has been an alarming trend of young adults who fail to physically qualify for military service. In a study of 10 Southern states, the Citadel found that 27% of potential enlistees between the ages of 17 and 24 are too obese to qualify. Furthermore, an astounding 47% of men and 59% of women fail the entry-level training test required by the Army. Lt. Gen. Mark Hertling, former commander of U.S. Army Europe and member of then-President Barack Obama’s task force on physical fitness, weighed in on the broader impact of the results, noting the study “provides critical insight into the real national security issues posed by recruits who are less physically fit and less prepared for military service than they have ever been in our history.”


The importance of regular exercise as a health tool cannot be underestimated — whether you aspire to join the military or not. Exercise produces numerous physical and mental health benefits and as we learn more about COVID-19, it becomes even more important.


Research demonstrates that COVID-19 causes severe symptoms and a higher risk of being hospitalized for those who suffer from chronic conditions like obesity, hypertension and diabetes. With over 70% of Americans being considered overweight or obese, there was bound to be a devastating impact on the country. In addition to COVID-19’s threat to physical health and broad discussions about comorbidity, more than half of adults say that the pandemic negatively affects their mental health. It should.


Exercise can help alleviate these concerns. Regular physical activity, even less than the suggested 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity per week, helps prevent chronic conditions, maintain healthy weight, boosts the immune system and reduces symptoms of stress and anxiety. And research confirms physical activity serves as a protective barrier against COVID-19.


For Americans — including potential military recruits — to avail themselves of these benefits, they need access to affordable fitness. This is where fitness centers across the country can play an important role by providing the safest environment possible so that everyone can continue improving their overall health. Not everyone can afford an at-home gym or will have the ability to exercise outdoors during the winter months, leaving a fitness center as the best option.


Fitness centers have made it clear they want to be a part of the solution and are committed

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Ohio’s fitness centers have critical role in COVID-19 fight



Kenneth P. Moritsugu wearing a suit and tie smiling at the camera: Dr, Kenneth P. Moritsugu


© Courtesy of Dr. Kenneth P. Moritsugu
Dr, Kenneth P. Moritsugu

The COVID-19 virus has increased its grip on the country as states experience surges in new cases. Ohio is in the thick of this new surge with confirmed cases quadrupling in the past 30 days and hospitalizations doubling. In response, Gov. Mike DeWine has threatened to close restaurants, bars and fitness centers within a week if the number of newly confirmed cases increase. While well-intentioned, the governor should reconsider his position on closing fitness centers in light of the toll COVID-19 has taken on our physical and mental health, and the benefits physical activity can have in combating this and other diseases.

The lockdowns across the nation led people to be more sedentary, with a 32% reduction in physical activity. In addition, a recent nationwide poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation reports that more than half of U.S. adults — about 53% — say that their mental health has been negatively impacted by worry and stress over the pandemic. That number is a significant increase from the 32% who reported being similarly affected in March.

Further, these negative health trends also bring into view issues of health equity and health disparities for some of our most vulnerable populations. In Ohio, physical inactivity and obesity disproportionately impact our lower income population and communities of color. The obesity rate for white Ohioans is 34% compared with 43% of Latinos and 36% of African Americans.

Fitness plays a critical role in combating the virus and improving people’s overall physical and mental health. Chronic health conditions impacting millions of Americans including obesity, hypertension and diabetes can cause complications and significantly increase the chances of hospitalization and death for those who contract COVID-19. There is also increasing evidence that some racial and ethnic minority groups are being disproportionately affected by COVID-19.

Regular physical activity can protect us from these conditions while helping us to fight the virus. You might not think you have the time to squeeze in a workout, but researchers found that as little as 20 minutes of exercise can have anti-inflammatory effects that boost your immune system.

Mental health, much like physical health, also disproportionately affects our lower-income communities. While 7.3% of Ohioans who make over $75,000 a year reported that they experience frequent mental distress, that number skyrockets to 26.2% for those making less than $25,000 a year.

Levels of stress, anxiety and depression across the U.S. all increased during the pandemic. To cope, it appears many Americans turned to alcohol, according to a study by RAND and the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, which found a spike in consumption. As lead author of the study and RAND sociologist Michael Pollard noted, “People’s depression increases, anxiety increases, (and) alcohol use is often a way to cope with these feelings.”

Once again, fitness can play a role, turning people away from increased alcohol use and toward regular physical activity is known to have long-term mental health benefits that

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It’s critical to keep fitness centers open amid COVID-19

One less-reported consequence of the lockdowns associated with the COVID-19 pandemic is the toll the virus has taken on our physical and mental health. As we look for ways to to improve our nation’s health, policymakers should work with fitness centers to ensure COVID-19 transmission-mitigation efforts are in place so that these facilities can remain open and available.

The lockdowns across the nation led people to be more sedentary, with one study showing a 32% reduction in physical activity. In addition, a recent nationwide poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation reports that more than half of U.S. adults, about 53%, say their mental health has been negatively impacted by worry and stress over the pandemic. That number is a significant increase from the 32% who reported being similarly affected in March.

Furthermore, these negative health trends may be exacerbated by issues of health equity and health disparities for some of our most vulnerable populations. In Texas, physical inactivity and obesity disproportionately impact our lower-income population and communities of color. The obesity rate for adults in Texas is nearly 35%. However, while only 33% of whites are reported obese, that figure jumps to nearly 40% for Black and Latino Americans.

Most individuals and families don’t have the resources or space for at-home fitness equipment, so access to spacious, well-ventilated, big-box fitness facilities can play an important role in efforts to combat the virus and improve people’s overall physical and mental health. Chronic health conditions impacting millions of Americans including obesity, hypertension and diabetes can cause complications and significantly increase the chances of hospitalization and death for those who contract COVID-19.

There is also increasing evidence that some racial and ethnic minority groups are being disproportionately affected by COVID-19. Regular physical activity can protect us from these conditions while helping us to fight the virus. Researchers found that as little as 20 minutes of exercise can have anti-inflammatory effects that boost your immune system.

Mental health, much like physical health, also disproportionately impacts our lower-income communities. While 6.7% of Texas residents who make over $75,000 a year reported that they experience frequent mental distress; that number nearly triples to 18% for those making less than $25,000 a year.

Levels of stress, anxiety and depression across the U.S. all increased during the pandemic. To cope, it appears many Americans turned to alcohol, according to a study by the Rand Corp. and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism that found a spike in consumption. As lead author of the study and Rand sociologist Michael Pollard noted, “People’s depression increases, anxiety increases, [and] alcohol use is often a way to cope with these feelings.”

Once again, fitness can play a role; turning people away from increased alcohol use and toward regular physical activity is known to have long-term mental health benefits that reduce those conditions many are struggling with right now.

All of this underscores the critical need for regular physical activity, especially now in the time of COVID-19, for our country’s physical

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Covid cases, hospitalizations continue to surge as U.S. reaches ‘critical point’ in pandemic

  • Three dozen states reported that the average number of people currently hospitalized with Covid-19 rose by at least 5% over the past week.
  • “We are at another critical point in the pandemic response,” said Adm. Brett Giroir, assistant secretary of health who leads the government’s testing effort.
  • Giroir went on to emphasize that “we can control the virus” by following public health measures like social distancing, mask wearing, avoiding crowded gatherings and the frequent washing of hands.



a group of people standing around a plane: Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT) arrive with a correctional patient at North Shore Medical Center where the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients are treated, in Miami, Florida, U.S. July 14, 2020.


© Provided by CNBC
Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT) arrive with a correctional patient at North Shore Medical Center where the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients are treated, in Miami, Florida, U.S. July 14, 2020.

The United States is reporting another record-high average number of new cases of the coronavirus as a top health official warned Wednesday that the country is at a “critical point.”

The U.S. reported 73,240 new cases on Tuesday, bringing the seven-day average of new cases up to about 71,832, a fresh record and an increase of more than 20% compared with a week ago, according to a CNBC analysis of data collected by Johns Hopkins University.

Three dozen states reported that the average number of people currently hospitalized with Covid-19 rose by at least 5% over the past week, according to data from the Covid Tracking Project, which tracks testing, hospitalization and other data on the outbreak. Cases are up by at least that amount in 45 states, according to Johns Hopkins data.

“As the nation did after Memorial Day, we are at another critical point in the pandemic response,” Adm. Brett Giroir, assistant secretary of health who leads the government’s testing effort, said Wednesday on NBC’s “TODAY” show. “Cases are going up in most states across the country. Hospitalizations are up, although we’re still tens of thousands of hospitalizations below where we were in July, but that is rising. And we are starting to see the increase in deaths.”



chart, histogram


© Provided by CNBC


Giroir acknowledged that increased testing alone cannot explain the surge in cases, even as President Donald Trump attributes the surge to testing and continues to downplay the outbreak.

Giroir went on to emphasize that “we can control the virus” by following public health measures like social distancing, mask wearing, avoiding crowded gatherings and with the frequent washing of hands.

The surge in cases and hospitalizations is beginning to overwhelm some hospitals in parts of the country. The Salt Lake Tribune reported over the weekend that the Utah Hospital Association is asking the governor to allow its members to ration care. And in Texas, El Paso County Judge Ricardo Samaniego issued a curfew on Sunday to protect “overwhelmed and exhausted” hospitals and workers.

Public health specialists and epidemiologists have warned for months that the virus would likely surge as the weather turned colder in the fall and winter. That’s largely because people are more likely to stay indoors in colder weather and because some epidemiologists believe the virus can spread more easily through colder, drier air.

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Critical Care Equipment Market Forecast to 2027

The critical care equipment market was valued at US$ 21,682. 65 million in 2019 and is projected to reach US$ 47,171. 42 million by 2027; it is expected to grow at a CAGR of 9. 5% during 2020–2027.

New York, Oct. 21, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Reportlinker.com announces the release of the report “Critical Care Equipment Market Forecast to 2027 – COVID-19 Impact and Global Analysis by Product, Application, and End User and Geography” – https://www.reportlinker.com/p05978065/?utm_source=GNW

The growth of the market is mainly attributed to factors such growing research in biotechnology sector and increasing product launches. However, the disruption of supply chain and logistics due to the rapid spread of COVID-19 is among the factors hindering the growth of the market.

In the last few months, it has become clear that COVID-19 is a threat to global health.. The virus primarily attacks the healthy cells located in the lungs, resulting in respiratory problems. The virus reduces the oxygen-carrying capacity of hemoglobin present in the blood and encounters breathing problems; in the most severe cases, a ventilator is used to push air, with increased oxygen levels, into the lungs.

The normal saturation level shows 95% oxygen level in the body, and the oxygen level can drop up to 50–60% in some of the COVID-19 patients.In such situation, there would be reduction in oxygen supply to different organs of the body, which leads to organ failures.

Ventilators are life-support machines, though they would not cure an illness, but can keep patients alive while suffering from an infection.Oxygen therapy in cases of severe COVID-19 saves the lives of patients.

According to an article published in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, in June 2020, physicians could reduce more than 50% death rate among COVID-19 patients by using ventilators.

Based on product, the global critical care equipment market is segmented into patient monitor systems, ventilators, infusion pumps, and others.The patient monitor systems segment held a larger share of the market in 2019.

The ventilators segment is expected to grow at a higher CAGR during the forecast period.Based on application, the market is segmented into cardiology, pulmonology, neurology, orthopedic, and others.

The cardiology segment held a larger share of the market in 2019, and the pulmonology segment is expected to register a higher CAGR during the forecast period.Based on end user, the global critical care equipment market is segmented into hospitals, ambulatory care centers, home care, and others.

The hospitals segment held a larger share of the market in 2019, and it is further expected to report a higher CAGR in the market during the forecast period.

The Food Safety and Inspection Service, Food and Drug Administration, National Institute of Health, International Civil Aviation Organization, and European Medical Association are a few of the major secondary sources referred to while preparing this report.
Read the full report: https://www.reportlinker.com/p05978065/?utm_source=GNW

About Reportlinker
ReportLinker is an award-winning market research solution. Reportlinker finds and organizes the latest industry data so you get all the market research you

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Newborn Baby Wrongly Declared Dead Found Alive Before Burial, In Critical State

KEY POINTS

  • The baby was reportedly born after six and a half months of pregnancy
  • The newborn baby was declared dead and was taken for burial
  • Hospital has launched an investigation into the incident

A newborn baby girl, who was declared dead by a hospital, was found alive before her burial. The incident took place Friday in Bangladesh.

According to a local media report, the baby was pronounced dead at Dhaka Medical College Hospital after she was born prematurely. However, before her burial, the child came back to life and was rushed for treatment at the Neonatal Intensive Care unit at the hospital. The child currently remains in critical condition, The Daily Star reported.

“Her condition is very critical . . . We are trying our level best,” Brig Gen AKM Nasir Uddin, director of the hospital told local media, adding that a four-member team will be conducting an investigation into the incident. The probe will reportedly be led by Dr. Manisha Banerjee, head of the neonatology department.

“We will take action upon receiving the findings,” the director said.

Shahinur Akter gave birth to the child after six and a half months of pregnancy. A doctor declared the child dead and hospital staffers put the baby in an abandoned box of gloves. The staff later asked the family to take the child for burial, a source told local media.

The child had to be moved from one graveyard to another due to the high burial cost which the family could not afford. However, in the second burial ground, as the grave was being dug, the newborn started moving her limbs and showed signs of being alive, the baby’s father, Yeasin Mollah, claimed. The child was then taken back to the hospital.

The DMCH director told local media that the child was put under observation for a couple of hours after being born but was declared dead as there was no pulse.

Newborn In this photo, a premature newborn lies on a cot in the neo-natal ward of the Delafontaine hospital in Saint Denis near Paris, March 19, 2013. Photo: Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images

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