Council

fitness

Council Post: Adapting To The Digitization Of Fitness: Part I

Fortune 100 VP | Silicon Valley Executive | Founder of BestBox.co | Growth Advisor | Author of The Digital Intrapreneur | CoachTony.ca

The way most people were exposed to or became involved in fitness in the past was pretty cut and dry. Physical gyms and classes were the primary drivers of the industry. Sure, there were niche apps and home programs that worked for some, but arguably only a fraction. In light of the Covid-19 pandemic, however, I believe the industry has changed not only significantly but permanently. 

Earlier this year, I wrote an article titled “Putting Your Fitness Business On The Digital Road Map,” and over the last six months, there has been a veritable explosion of digital growth in this sector. From banner brands all the way down to small-town gyms, fitness professionals have had to get smarter and more agile to deliver the kind of digital fitness experience consumers are demanding during this unprecedented time in our global history.

Big Players Making Moves In The Digital Fitness Market

The way I see it, there is no bigger signal of this seismic shift than a company like Apple entering the marketplace. Apple is one of the largest companies in the world, and it carries on its back a metric ton of consumer influence, choice and perception. The company recently launched its virtual fitness application, Apple Fitness+, available on the Apple Watch and iPad products.

In a similar vein, Lululemon — a company that has largely operated as a clothing business — recently purchased the at-home fitness company Mirror, which sells smart mirrors that stream home workout classes. The company has already upped its projections for Mirror’s profits in this fiscal year, from $100 million to $150 million.

Spin giant Peloton has seen sales explode in the fourth quarter, 172% over last year, with subscriber numbers up 113%. Demand for at-home and digital-ready fitness is high, and its supply chain is struggling to keep up. When companies of this size are driving digital innovation at this level, it’s a clear signal that we’ve crossed into new territory.

Spikes In Mergers And Acquisitions

Anytime we see increased activity around mergers or acquisitions in an industry, it’s a sign that things are shifting. Perhaps it is consolidation because everyone is running out of money. Or, more likely to be the case right now, it’s the breakneck speed of growth — everyone is buying each other up in the hopes of being the one to lead the pack.

In 2019, Mindbody, a technology platform for health and fitness companies, was acquired for just under $2 billion. And earlier this year, Eric Roza, a tech entrepreneur with extensive experience in the software and digital space, acquired CrossFit. I believe this acquisition will bring a renewed focus on increasing digital developments in a company that was already trending up before the pandemic began.

Another company in this space, Zwift, allows runners and bikers to exercise in a simulated 3D world via its online

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medicine

IMA to Indian medicine council

The IMA also demanded the withdrawal of the order and delineation of the Indian medicine disciplines based on original Indian texts.
“IMA exhorts the council to develop their own surgical disciplines from their own ancient texts and not claim the surgical disciplines of modern medicine as its own. Such a deviant practice is unbecoming of a statutory body. The IMA will have no objections for the council to develop their own dedicated disciplines without mixing modern medicine surgical disciplines,” the IMA told the CCIM, which regulates the medical study and practice of ayurveda in the country.
The CCIM, in a gazetted notification dated November 20, said “The (PG ayurveda) students would receive training in shalya (general surgery) and shalakya (diseases of ear, nose, throat, eye, head, oro-dentistry) specialisations. It will make them legally valid to perform procedures such as skin grafting, cataract surgery and root canal treatment.”
On Saturday, the IMA, through a press release, “unequivocally” condemned the “uncivil ways of the Central Council of Indian Medicine to… empower its practitioners with undeserving areas of practice”. “The said council has come out with a gazette notification of a list of surgical procedures which can be performed by its practitioners. They have no right to the technical terms, techniques and procedures of modern medicine. The IMA draws the Lakshman Rekha which they can cross at their peril,” the IMA said in a press note on Saturday.
It lambasted as the CCIM saying that the council has the dubious reputation of prescribing modern medicine textbooks to its students.
The IMA demanded that the government should refrain from posting any modern medicine doctor in the colleges of Indian Medicine, stating that it saw this move as a retrograde step of mixing the systems, which “will be resisted at all costs”.
“All over India, students and practitioners of modern medicine are agitated over this violation of mutual identity and respect. What is the sanctity of NEET if such lateral shortcuts are devised,” it asked.
“Corrupting modern medicine by mixing it with other systems and poaching the disciplines of modern medicine through the back door is certainly foul play of first order,” it added.
Meanwhile, a legal notice was sent to the IMA by Supreme Court lawyer Archana Pathak Dave on behalf of Vaidya Prashant Tiwari, a practitioner of ayurvedic medicine, on November 18. The notice was sent to the IMA for its “irresponsible, defamatory, false and misleading” statements made with an intention to “disrepute AYUSH medicines and their practitioners”.
The notice called out IMA for “referring to AYUSH medicine as placebo”, for stating they are not “drug”, besides not supporting AYUSH Ministry’s claim of ayurvedic medicine being effective against the COVID-19.
On October 6, the central government had announced the National Clinical Management Protocol for the COVID-19, based on ayurveda and yoga, following which the IMA on October 9 had asked Union Health Minister Dr Harsh Vardhan to produce substantiating evidence of it.
Questioning the scientific basis of these protocols, the IMA asked the
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health

Wallingford Criticized For Resuming In-Person Council Meetings

WALLINGFORD, CT — A “large portion” of Wallingford’s coronavirus cases in October came from a single event in town, according to Health Director Stephen Civitelli.

In an update to the Town Council this week, Civitelli said health officials were able to contact trace the confirmed COVID-19 cases to the event and found there were relationships with multiple people that also ended up impacting schools.

Civitelli provided the update at Tuesday night’s meeting, which was the first in-person Town Council meeting since April because of the coronavirus pandemic. The decision to resume in-person council meetings was criticized by several people on the Wallingford Patch Neighbor Post page and a speaker at the meeting.

Coronavirus cases have been on the rise in Wallingford in October. There were 20 confirmed cases as of Oct. 13, compared to 33 cases in September, 24 in August and 18 in July.

There were 1,928 tests conducted from Sept. 26 to Oct. 3 with a positive test rate of .7 percent, according to Civitelli.

Phase 3 of the state’s reopening, which increased indoor restaurant and personal service capacity from 50 to 75 percent, began Oct. 8 and Civitelli said health officials are trying to monitor reopenings with the cases and “how we react to that as a community.”

“We’re trying to monitor everything as best we can to try and get a grasp on where cases are and get to those quickly, so that we can identify the situation and try to isolate the people before it becomes a greater issue,” Civitelli said.

Civitelli, who was appointed this week to Gov. Ned Lamont’s Vaccine Advisory Group, compared Wallingford’s case rate to two cities that were recently assigned a “Red” alert level for the state’s coronavirus warning system. Towns in the red threshold have the option to scale back to the state’s second reopening phase.

Based on a new case rate per 100,000 population, New London had a 14-day rolling average of 30.5, Norwich was 46.9 and Wallingford was at 3.7, according to Civitelli.

The school district notified parents several times within the past week of confirmed COVID-19 cases at five different schools. Councilor Chris Shortell asked Civitelli if there is a concern about the school system.

Civitelli said “not at this point” because contact tracing showed the cases originated from within the community and were not spread from students in the same cohort at school.

“If we’re identifying where everything is coming from, that’s a good thing,” Civitelli said. “It’s when I can’t wrap my arms around it, and there’s no way where I can trace it back, then that’s where we’re back in April and early May where it was just so widespread. At that point, then you have true community spread. As of right now, it seems like it’s fairly steady.”

In-person meetings resume in Wallingford

Council Chairman Vincent Cervoni opened the meeting saying it was “appropriate” for the council to resume in-person meetings.

“In the past month, children of Wallingford have returned

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