Community

dentist

Former Salem dentist, community leader Selma Pierce hit, killed by car

Selma Pierce, a well-known community leader, retired dentist and former legislative candidate, was struck and killed by a car Tuesday evening, according to the Salem Police Department.

Pierce, 66, was the wife of Bud Pierce, who ran an unsuccessful campaign for governor in 2016. Gov. Kate Brown defeated him. On Monday, KATU’s news partners reported that Bud Pierce would seek the governor’s  office in 2022.



a group of people posing for a photo


© Provided by KATU Portland


Selma Pierce was active in her community, well-known in political circles and ran for a seat in the state House this year as a Republican. She was unable to unseat incumbent Paul Evans, a Democrat, however.

In a statement released Tuesday night, House Republican Leader Christine Drazan of Canby said Republicans in the House were devastated.

“We are profoundly saddened by this sudden loss of our friend and community leader. Selma dedicated her life to serving people. She touched the lives of thousands through volunteer dental work to at-risk populations, service on local education foundations, and her and her husband Bud’s generous support of countless community organizations,” Drazan said. “The Pierces are a pillar of the Salem community and this loss will be felt deeply across our state. Our prayers are with Bud and the entire Pierce family this evening.”

In a tweet, Gov. Brown said she and her husband, Dan, extended their condolences to the Pierce family.

“They are in our thoughts during this difficult time,” she said.

Senate President Peter Courtney also expressed sorrow upon learning of Selma’s death.

“Selma was a dear person who always put others before herself. She cared deeply for those in need. Selma loved to smile and always searched for ways to make life better for others,” he said in a statement. “She was very devoted to her family. I can’t imagine Salem without her. My heart goes out to her husband Bud and her children, Kristina and Michael.”

Salem police said Selma was walking on Doaks Ferry Road NW near Hidden Valley Drive when a driver of a Chevrolet SUV struck her around 5 p.m.

Police said it appeared she was in the road when she was hit. She died at the scene.

The driver stopped and cooperated with investigators.

Selma was born in San Francisco to Lawrence and Priscilla Moon.

Her grandparents immigrated to America and her legislative campaign website detailed the racism her family experienced. Upon graduating from Harvard Business School, no one would hire her first-generation-Chinese-American father and he had to settle for a job in a family member’s market. The state of California eventually hired him as an auditor for state hospitals.

Selma attended the University of California, Berkeley, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in biochemistry and then earned a Doctor of Dental Surgery at the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Dentistry.

She volunteered for many organizations, including Medical Teams International, Mission of Mercy, Salem Area Chamber of Commerce, OHSU Foundation Board of Trustees and many other organizations.

Selma was married to Bud,

Read More
dentist

Well-known Salem dentist, community leader Selma Pierce hit, killed by car

Selma Pierce, a well-known community leader, retired dentist and former legislative candidate, was struck and killed by a car Tuesday evening, according to the Salem Police Department.

Pierce, 66, was the wife of Bud Pierce, who ran an unsuccessful campaign for governor in 2016. Gov. Kate Brown defeated him. On Monday, KATU’s news partners reported that Bud Pierce would seek the governor’s  office in 2022.



a group of people posing for a photo


© Provided by KATU Portland


Selma Pierce was active in her community and ran for a seat in the state House this year as a Republican. She was unable to unseat incumbent Paul Evans, a Democrat, however.

In a statement released Tuesday night, House Republican Leader Christine Drazan of Canby said Republicans in the House were devastated.

“We are profoundly saddened by this sudden loss of our friend and community leader. Selma dedicated her life to serving people. She touched the lives of thousands through volunteer dental work to at-risk populations, service on local education foundations, and her and her husband Bud’s generous support of countless community organizations,” Drazan said. “The Pierces are a pillar of the Salem community and this loss will be felt deeply across our state. Our prayers are with Bud and the entire Pierce family this evening.”

In a tweet, Gov. Brown said she and her husband, Dan, extended their condolences to the Pierce family.

“They are in our thoughts during this difficult time,” she said.

Salem police said Selma was walking on Doaks Ferry Road NW near Hidden Valley Drive when a driver of a Chevrolet SUV struck her around 5 p.m.

Police said it appeared she was in the road when she was hit. She died at the scene.

The driver stopped and cooperated with investigators.

Selma was born in San Francisco to Lawrence and Priscilla Moon.

Her grandparents immigrated to America and her legislative campaign website detailed the racism her family experienced. Upon graduating from Harvard Business School, no one would hire her first-generation-Chinese-American father and he had to settle for a job in a family member’s market. The state of California eventually hired him as an auditor for state hospitals.

Selma attended the University of California, Berkeley, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in biochemistry and then earned a Doctor of Dental Surgery at the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Dentistry.

She volunteered for many organizations, including Medical Teams International, Mission of Mercy, Salem Area Chamber of Commerce, OHSU Foundation Board of Trustees and many other organizations.

Selma was married to Bud, who is an oncologist, for over 35 years. They have two children, Kristina and Michael.

Source Article

Read More
medicine

A program to improve health in Twin Cities’ Black community begins with healing power of soul medicine

 

Years ago, when the medical community asked why so many Black babies were dying, Atum Azzahir asked a different question: Why are some babies living, even thriving, despite poverty, health care disparities and other challenges? Azzahir already knew the answer but she set forth to prove it. For nearly 25 years, Azzahir, lovingly called Elder Atum, has been executive director of the Cultural Wellness Center. The Minneapolis center partners with counties and health care providers to tap into the resiliency of the Black community to improve health and financial stability. In 2021, the center will launch a new collaboration drawing on the wisdom of community elders, known as “soul medicine.”

 

Q: Soul medicine: How do you describe it?

A: In short, soul medicine is reconnection to the wisdom of Black culture and thought. It’s rooted in African ways of thinking and being. In African tradition, many people studied the journey of the soul. Take soul food; you immediately think about Black people. Soul music? You know when you put it on, no one can sit still. Soul mates are people you connect with at such a deep level. That’s what soul medicine is like.

 

Q: And its efficacy is backed up by research.

A: Our research shows that the more social cohesion and social support a person has, the healthier they are. You must have community to be healthy and well. Every area of development, from health care to economics, will be richer with the inclusion of soul medicine. We see soul medicine as an extension of our work with entrepreneurs as co-owners of the Midtown Global Market.

 

Q: How might soul medicine look in practice?

A: Let’s go back to 1994 when, with funding from Medica and Allina Health Foundation, we researched why a number of babies lived. We found that babies born in ways that honored African cultural traditions, such as doulas, birthing teams, elder guides and breastfeeding, thrived.

 

Q: So, it’s the antidote to what you call the “People’s Theory of Sickness”?

A: We believe that individualism, the loss of culture and community, makes us sick. We’re seeing it in the Black community in increasing rates of diabetes, cancer, heart disease, food insecurity, homelessness, drug addiction, domestic violence. On top of that, we’re dealing with COVID-19 and George Floyd’s killing. We are grieving, mourning and looking for ways to heal. Reclaiming culture through soul medicine is a path to health and healing.

 

Q: There is healing for the healers as well, I’m guessing.

A: We see soul medicine as an example of mutual aid in community health promotion. While our elders and community healers provide much-needed guidance and support, they also find purpose in their work.

 

Q: You’ll be partnering with Allina Health and Medica Foundation on this project for about one year. What do you hope to accomplish?

A: We’re documenting now what soul medicine looks like and specifically how our soul medics will provide guidance and support. This is largely experientially based. Elders will be

Read More
fitness

‘It’s not just fitness – everything suffers’: Community heroes reveal fears over lockdown ban on Children

As the seconds ticked by towards sporting wipeout on Wednesday, amateur boxing coach Knox White winced through agonising pain during a flare-up of his degenerative multiple sclerosis.

The wheelchair-bound 46 year-old was struck down twice within a few hours that evening, but nothing was stopping him from taking his final sessions for the youngsters at Hayling Island Community Centre.

“I didn’t need reminding why we all need to be here,” says the former Navy boxer of his packed classes with local youngsters. “After the first week back from lockdown, one of the mums came up to me and said, ‘Knox, I’m so glad we’re back as my son really needs this. I’ve been so worried because one of his friends has taken his life and another one’s attempted to’. I just thought to myself, ‘Oh my God, this is how serious it all is’.”

After a week in which the great and good of elite sport rallied behind The Daily Telegraph’s ‘Keep Kids Active in Lockdown’ campaign, it is thousands of lesser-known heroes carrying the heaviest burden over the weeks ahead.

Tennis coach Stephen Perez is another left worrying about his deprived youngsters. He describes how some of the 10 and 11-year-olds he works with under an LTA initiative in Chatham, Kent, are still rusty from bad diet and lack of exercise during the first lockdown.

“The awful thing is that we know exactly what’s coming,” says Perez, who also runs programmes providing healthy food to his community. “In our community there’s people really struggling with poverty and poor diet. We had some kids coming back with real weight issues to the point where they were struggling to just take part in exercise.

“If you’ve got a fairly contented life, it’s hard to put into perspective how big of a deal these classes are for those in a chaotic setting. For many, they haven’t really got a lot else to look forward to. It’s not just their fitness that suffers – it’s their behaviour, their routine, everything.”

Downing Street has so far resisted pressure to ease restrictions on children’s sport during lockdown, but ‘Keep Kids Active in Lockdown’ struck a chord in sport like few other newspaper campaigns had done before.

It is memories of formative experiences under grass-roots coaches like Perez and White that prompted many of the 130 star names to this week sign up to The Telegraph’s call on Government to offer children a reprieve.

The campaign was launched at 5pm on Monday, with epidemiologists, public health experts and cross-party MPs all warning of a mental and physical health time-bomb as activity levels plunge among under-18s.

Ambiguity and confusion for teachers over the risk of Covid infection inside and outdoors at schools had already led to many schools scaling back contact sports or abandoning them altogether during PE classes.

However, despite scientists insisting outdoor infection risk is significantly lower than in the classrooms, Boris Johnson was unflinching in his determination to make no exceptions to his blanket

Read More
medicine

Helping athletes affected by sexual violence: my challenge to the sports and exercise medicine community

My childhood story

If you saw me in clinic as a young kid, you would almost certainly describe me as healthy, active, energetic and high achieving. I wore a smile as wide as my face and talked excitedly about my friends, sports and summer plans whenever asked. What you wouldn’t know about me was that in third grade, I was raped by a member of my extended family; and throughout middle and high school, I was sexually and emotionally abused by an alcoholic parent. You would not know this as a clinician because I always wore an impenetrable shield in order to get through my visit with you. My smile and kindness served as a mask to hide what I felt were the shameful, dark parts of me, and my costume always included some combination of athletic clothes and sports equipment.

Contrary to many recent high-profile cases,1 I was not subjected to sexual violence in sport. Yet sport was fully enmeshed in my experiences of sexual violence. Beyond the genuine joy and happiness I felt while playing sports, they provided me a necessary sense of safety and belonging outside my home and important safety from my unrelenting shame and fear. Simply put: sports saved my life.

My challenging experiences with clinicians

The summer before ninth grade, at a time when I was actively experiencing abuse, I visited my paediatrician for a preparticipation sports examination. My physician noted that I had lost a significant amount of weight since my last physical. I had never been preoccupied with my weight, but he accused me of restricting food and suggested treatment for anorexia. This was not the issue, but my truth was not important to him. He had convinced himself that he knew my struggle without even giving me the opportunity to speak my truth.

During my junior soccer season in college, after a bout with bronchitis, I found myself struggling to breathe during exercise. I met with multiple doctors and underwent numerous tests. The tests always came back negative and were often accompanied with ‘there is nothing I can do for you’ or ‘maybe it’s time to stop playing sports’. Still sidelined, my athletic trainer encouraged me to visit one more specialist who listened carefully to my symptoms and ultimately diagnosed me with exercise-induced asthma. It was a game-changer. Though grateful for that physician (and my athletic trainer), I never forgot the feeling of being unheard and not believed by those before him.

The impact of my healthcare experiences

Perhaps the most detrimental aspect of these healthcare encounters was that they reinforced my negative beliefs: that my experiences did not matter, that my voice did not matter. Trust is a central component to any clinician–patient relationship, and the ability to trust is also a major hurdle for those affected by sexual violence. To this day, I struggle seeing clinicians—not because I believe their intentions are not good or that they will harm me, but because I fear not being heard when I

Read More
health

A promotion and awards for Lakeview Regional Medical Center, Slidell Memorial | St. Tammany community news

Lakeview Regional Medical Center, a campus of Tulane Medical Center, has promoted Tilly Gard to its trauma program director role.

Gard has been with Lakeview Regional since 2012, serving most recently as trauma program manager. Under her leadership, Lakeview Regional achieved the first Level III ACS Trauma Verification in the state with no deficiencies, a Lakeview spokeswoman said.

Gard was the recipient of the Frist Humanitarian Award in 2018 for Lakeview Regional and HCA MidAmerica Division. She was also honored in 2012 as a Great 100 Nurses of Louisiana. Gard earned prior clinical experience from hospitals all over the southeastern region of Louisiana. 

“A critical component of our trauma program is leadership, and as we progress on our trauma journey and advance trauma care in our region, I cannot think of a more qualified leader than Tilly Richard-Gard,” said Hiral Parel, Lakeview Regional CEO. “Tilly has led many significant components of our program — performance improvement, community outreach and research, to name just a few.

“I look forward to the future of our trauma program — it is in excellent hands with Tilly Gard, Dr. Marco Hidalgo and the entire team.”

She is a native of Louisiana and attended Nicholls State University College of Nursing. She received her nursing degree from University of Southwestern Louisiana College of Nursing in Lafayette. She is a member of the Louisiana State Nurses Association, American Nurses Association, Emergency Nurses Association, Louisiana Emergency Nurses Association, American Trauma Society, Society of Trauma Nurses, and American Society of Perioanesthesia Nurses.

For more information about Lakeview Regional, please visit lakeviewregional.com or call (985) 867-380

Slidell Memorial applauded for commitment to stroke care

Slidell Memorial Hospital has received the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award.

The award recognizes the hospital’s commitment to ensuring stroke patients receive the most appropriate treatment based on nationally recognized, research-based guidelines based on the latest scientific evidence.

Slidell Memorial earned the award by meeting specific quality achievement measures for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke patients at a set level for a designated period.

These measures include evaluation of the proper use of medications and other stroke treatments aligned with the most up-to-date, evidence-based guidelines with the goal of speeding recovery and reducing death and disability for stroke patients. Before discharge, patients also receive education on managing their health, get a follow-up visit scheduled, as well as other care transition interventions

The hospital also received the Association’s Target: Type 2 Diabetes Honor Roll award. To qualify for this recognition, hospitals must meet quality measures developed with more than 90% of compliance for 12 consecutive months for the “Overall Diabetes Cardiovascular Initiative Composite Score.”

Additionally, Slidell Memorial met specific scientific guidelines as a Primary Stroke Center, featuring a comprehensive system for rapid diagnosis and treatment of stroke patients admitted to the emergency department.

“We are pleased to recognize Slidell Memorial for their commitment to stroke care,” said Lee H. Schwamm, M.D., national chairman of the Quality Oversight

Read More
health

Exceptional Healthcare to Open New Community Hospitals Across Arizona

Exceptional Community Hospital Celebrates Groundbreaking for Maricopa Facility;
Additional Community Hospitals Already Planned for Yuma, Prescott, Other Communities

A Texas-based hospital group is making a strong entry into the Arizona marketplace, with a critically needed community hospital coming to Maricopa and other hospitals opening across Arizona in the near future.

Exceptional Healthcare is entering Arizona with its first facility in the City of Maricopa, in the Phoenix metro region. The 20,000-square-foot Phase 1 of the facility will be located in the heart of Maricopa on State Route 347, and will be the first facility of its kind in the community.

The state-of-the-art facility includes a specialty internal medicine hospital, a 24-hour emergency department, a digital imaging suite – including CT Scan, X-Ray, mobile MRI and ultrasound – an in-house laboratory, and outpatient and inpatient hospital beds for acute admissions and overnight observation of patients.

Additionally, in partnership with higher-level hospitals in the Phoenix area, Exceptional Healthcare will feature a landing area for air ambulances to ensure the fastest transfer of patients needing a higher level of care.

Exceptional Healthcare is already planning for additional facilities in Prescott and Yuma as well as locations in as many as six other communities throughout the state.

“We are very excited to be entering the Arizona marketplace and particularly the City of Maricopa with our first Exceptional Healthcare hospital in the state,” said Saeed Mahboubi, Chief Financial Officer for Exceptional Healthcare. “Arizona is facing a shortage of healthcare facilities and professionals, particularly in rural areas and smaller communities in the state. These new hospitals will fill a critical need and help strengthen the state’s overall healthcare infrastructure.”

Two socially distanced, invitation-only groundbreaking events will take place on Friday, November 13 at the Maricopa site. Members of the media are invited to attend either the 10:30 a.m. or 1:30 p.m. events. Media members who would like to attend should contact Tom Evans at the information above.

Neighborhood community hospitals are important because they offer residents of communities without large healthcare resources an alternative to driving long distances — often at times of medical emergency when seconds count. It also provides patients with the ability to stay closer to home for less significant internal medicine-related admissions, allowing patients to be closer to their families and loved ones.

At the Exceptional Healthcare facilities, each inpatient room will have accommodations for a family member to stay the night, as well as high-level concierge-style service. Plans include chef-prepared individualized meal service as well as complimentary toiletries, bath robe, and slippers for patients to increase their level of comfort.

As Maricopa continues to grow, the need for immediate lifesaving care is critical, and the ability for residents to be admitted to a hospital for basic inpatient care without having to leave Maricopa is a plus. The $18 million facility in Maricopa is expected to employ between 60-100 employees, and is scheduled to be completed in the fall of 2021.

Christian Price, Mayor of the City of Maricopa, welcomed

Read More
fitness

YMCA offers free fitness challenge to Charlotte community

The STRONG challenge asks participants to commit to 20 minutes of activity per day five days a week.

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — The goal of the STRONG Challenge is to get people moving and active even during the pandemic.

 “I think we have over 130 Y’s across the country that are doing this challenge around the same time,”  YMCA of Greater Charlotte Regional Healthy Living Director, Amy Crane said.

“It’s really about reigniting our energy building community, taking care of ourselves and our family and getting back to developing healthy habits,” Crane said.

All you have you have to do is commit to 20 minutes of activity per day for five days a week for the duration of the six-week challenge.

“We actually have a theme every week, this week we’re in the play week, next week is connect week after that rest then serve and then balance is our final week,” Crane said.

Sign up for the Wake Up Charlotte newsletter

The challenge is free of charge and open to anyone regardless of a YMCA membership status.

In fact, challenge participants will receive regular encouragement and support messages through text or emails.

 “We do Facebook live group exercise classes that you can participate in,” Crane said.

Participants can also self-track their success through a downloadable calendar or the YMCA of Greater Charlotte mobile app.

It’s a way this pandemic to come together to start feeling good again and to have accountability in a fun way.

RELATED: New Panthers Fitness Center a great addition to Charlotte

RELATED: Matthews non-profit is looking for businesses to help its younger adults with disabilities


Source Article

Read More
health

Black-Owned Gym, Elite Evolution Is Battling to Stay in Hackney and Help Its Community

Hackney was a different place a decade ago. Back in 2010, the area was infamous for being the most deprived borough in London and the sixth most deprived local authority in the country. Back then, to outsiders at least, the mere mention of its name was enough to elicit looks of both sympathy and concern, which, given that it was home to a notorious stretch of road known as ‘murder mile’ and was synonymous with crime, violence and poverty isn’t any wonder. But gentrification works fast in the capital and just two years later, in 2012, the year The Olympic Games was held on Hackney’s doorstep, The Observer commented on how: “The area’s traditional demographic – white working class, Turkish, Asian and Afro-Caribbeans – increasingly share the space with newcomers, who attend arty happenings…and then go for some organic Sussex wine.”

Hackney’s transformation has accelerated in the years since, and the borough is now commended for its social mobility credentials, while the number of mums sipping on “flat whites, nibbling courgette cake and chatting as their kids fight over an abacus” – again witnessed by The Observer– has multiplied too. Like most areas, gentrification has brought positives and negatives, with the main negative in Hackney being that some of the community’s residents and businesses, good people who have been there all along, have been pushed out, while the liberal elite has been transported in. But whoever the borough has been home to, one business has stood firm and continues to offer a place for all local residents to train at affordable prices. Just as it has done since 2010.

When the word ‘black’ is associated with something positive, we should all shout about it

Owned by three born and bred Hackney boys, Afolabi Akinola, Joshua Oladimeji and Emeka Obanye, Elite Evolution is a black-owned gym. It’s important to say that because, as Oladimeji observes, the word black is associated with so many negative narratives, when it’s associated with something positive, we should all shout about it. And what could be more positive than three young, black entrepreneurs who for the past decade have successfully fought to keep their business in Hackney, while holding second jobs in education and the prison system, in order to serve the community that moulded them.

“I felt like it was our responsibility,” says Oladimeji. “We didn’t shy away from that, we believe that we needed to be positive, we needed to be out there and we needed to show that there’s a safe space for anybody to come in and feel like this is somewhere they can train, where they can work out and won’t be discriminated against. [And for trainers] they’re not thinking that they can’t go higher than being just a trainer. They can be managers. They can be owners.”

This content is imported from YouTube. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.


Elite

Read More
health

Coronavirus Testing At Maplewood Community Pool To End This Week

MAPLEWOOD, NJ — After this week, coronavirus testing will no longer be offered at the community pool in Maplewood. Instead, several other locations in Essex County will offer testing by appointment.

Testing at the community pool is offered by appointment and to walk-up patients. It will continue each day from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Friday. Appointments can be made online.

Anyone hoping to get a test is reminded to bring to bring his or her insurance card and a form of identification. Uninsured people must bring a social security card to be tested for free.

Testing is offered regularly in Essex County. In the coming week, testing will also be offered at the following locations:

  • 10/27/20 – Branch Brook Park (Cherry Blossom Center)

  • 10/28/20 – Verona Community Pool

  • 10/29/20 – Local 68 Training Center-West Caldwell

  • 10/30/20 – Essex County Weequahic Park

  • 11/2/20 – Archery Field-West Orange

Residents can sign up to get a test or to volunteer at a testing location on the county’s website.

As of Monday, Maplewood had reported 402 total cases of the coronavirus and 27 deaths caused by the COVID-19 virus. Maplewood reports 299 people have recovered from the coronavirus.

This article originally appeared on the Maplewood Patch

Source Article

Read More