comedy

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The best medicine for 2020: The Finger Awards by Comedy for Change

If laughter is the best medicine, the Finger Awards sponsored by the organization Comedy for Change will be particularly welcome this year.The awards will be presented in a virtual ceremony as part of the British Television conference. It will be broadcast live on December 4 on Content London at 4 p.m. GMT.“We had over 100 candidates this year and we are going to give a special award for COVID-19 projects. There are some surprisingly strong candidates from Vietnam, Bahrain, and Pakistan,” said Omri Marcus, the director of the competition and the founder of Comedy for Change, which spotlights comedy that is both funny and enlightening.British comedian and former TV executive Cally Beaton will host Friday’s online ceremony. Beaton has incredibly funny Twitter and Instagram feeds, which are worth checking out if you need something to laugh about.Ricky Gervais will receive an award for his contribution to comedy, an honor he will likely refer to as “getting the Finger.”Among this year’s finalists are “Medical Bill Art,” a clip from by MSCHF that shows medical bills made into paintings, which were sold for over $73,000 in order to pay, what else? – medical bills.“Naked Ballots” by RepresentUS in the US features naked celebrities – including Sarah Silverman, Josh Gad and Sacha Baron Cohen as Borat (who actually appears fully clothed) – urging voters to mail in their ballots right away.

Other finalists’ clips lampoon the coronavirus crisis, including a Vietnamese film that features the Corona Dance, which raises awareness of the need for hand washing, and “Stay at Home” from Bahrain, which features pajama-clad people who have won medals for performing mundane tasks at home.Marcus was a writer on the comedy series Eretz Nehederet when he was in his early 20s and has written for and created several comic and reality series. He is also the head of Screenz Originals, a global company that creates entertainment-driven, interactive customer experiences, and he volunteers as head of publicity for Eye from Zion, a humanitarian organization that performs free surgeries in Third World countries. The organization, established by his father in 2007, has saved the sight of hundreds of people (mainly children) around the world.His motto is, “Changing the world, one joke at a time.”

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medicine

Over The Moon: How Margaret Cho helped Ken Jeong choose comedy over medicine

Ken Jeong has had many scene-stealing roles in his second career, including that star-making turn in The Hangover trilogy and as the anarchic Chang in Community.

And while many know that he was a real-life doctor specialising in internal medicine while doing stand-up comedy on the side before choosing acting full-time in 2006, what they may not know is that it was fellow Asian-American comic Margaret Cho who really encouraged him.

“I was inspired by Margaret. I got my start in comedy because of Margaret,” Jeong told news.com.au. “When I was in medical school and being her opening act at university inspired me to do this full-time. I would always ask Margaret, ‘Should I quit being a doctor? Should I quit medicine?’.

“I was so tortured, and I know I annoyed her. And she was so patient with me and so loving. It was just like a sibling – and it got me through my own internal confidence crises.

“Margaret really is a pioneer in so many ways. Every Asian-American comedian owes a debt of gratitude to Margaret. Also, when I developed my own show, Dr Ken, I had Margaret as my character’s sister for a reason.”

Jeong and Cho reunite this week in Netflix movie Over The Moon, an animated film which tells a modern story based on an ancient Chinese legend about moon goddess Chang’e and her significance to Chinese cultures that celebrate the Mid-Autumn Festival.

Ken Jeong used to be a doctor before he turned to acting
media_cameraKen Jeong used to be a doctor before he turned to acting
Margaret Cho has been performing comedy since the early 1990s
media_cameraMargaret Cho has been performing comedy since the early 1990s

Jeong voices a mythical moon creature named Gobi, who plays guide to young heroine Fei Fei while Cho voices one of Fei Fei’s aunts.

The film drops on Netflix this week and also features the voice talents of John Cho, Philippa Soo, Sandra Oh, Kimiko Glenn and newcomer Cathy Yan.

Over The Moon is an often strange, often tender and often musical movie pitched at families, but for the Asian diaspora community, it’ll have extra resonance.

Cho told news.com.au that she signed on for the role because it was “a beautiful story” that moved her while Jeong identified the film as part of a wave of change when it comes to Asian-American representation in Hollywood.

“I think the script and the story was so novel, and then also finding it’s an all Asian-American cast – like my dear friend Margaret and then John Cho, Phillipa Soo from Hamilton, Cathy Yan who really is a centrepiece of this movie,” Jeong said. “So you have this incredible Asian-American talent and on the heels of Crazy Rich Asians, Searching, Tigertail and Always Be My Maybe, there is like a wave. And it’s really nice to have that wave extend to the world of animation.”

RELATED: Rose Matafeo’s teenage geek-out over future co-star

Cho, who has been steadily working for almost 30 years, has been part of that wave when it was barely a trickle. She starred

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