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R.I. fitness clubs fined for refusing to close during two-week COVID-19 ‘pause’

LINCOLN, R.I. — An owner of fitness clubs in Rhode Island is defying an order from Governor Gina M. Raimondo for all gyms and recreational facilities to close for two weeks as health officials try to slow an alarming spike in COVID-19 cases.



a man holding a phone: The owner of Maxx Fitness Clubzz, Matt D'Amico, leaves his facility in Lincoln on Wednesday. He has decided to stay open despite the governor's orders for fitness clubs to close for two week. He said the spring closure was financially devastating.


© John Tlumacki/Globe Staff
The owner of Maxx Fitness Clubzz, Matt D’Amico, leaves his facility in Lincoln on Wednesday. He has decided to stay open despite the governor’s orders for fitness clubs to close for two week. He said the spring closure was financially devastating.

The two-week pause that started Monday closed bars, gyms, and casinos, asks most high school students to learn from home, and orders companies to have most employees work from home.

Matt D’Amico, who owns The Maxx Fitness Clubzz franchises in Lincoln and Warren, opened as usual on Monday, however, and has remained open since then. He said that closing would be financially devastating.

“We did it in March and the shutdown lasted 10, 12 weeks. I just can’t survive it again,” D’Amico said. “It’s not about profitability — it’s landlords, equipment rentals, payroll and staff. And, I don’t think it’s right, when everyone else gets to stay open.”

The Health Department issued $500 fines at both locations and ordered the facilities to close immediately and stay closed until the restrictions are lifted.

But D’Amico has refused to shut down. Both Maxx locations were open and busy Wednesday.

“You can say we’re fighting for freedom. It’s what it is,” D’Amico said. “I invested millions of dollars.”

Raimondo ordered the two-week pause in an attempt to stem the rising wave of new COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations, which led to the opening of field hospitals on Monday. Rhode Island was up to 59,005 confirmed coronavirus cases on Wednesday, with 1,032 new cases, 11 more deaths, and 408 people hospitalized.

The governor’s office and Health Department referred questions about Maxx Fitness Clubzz to the state Department of Business Regulation, where a spokesman declined to comment “as it is an ongoing and actively evolving situation.”

The fitness clubs are the first businesses to be cited since the pause began on Monday. “I have legal counsel, and we’ll take it day by day,” D’Amico said. “I don’t think fitness centers should be singled out… I believe I have constitutional rights to be able to operate my business.”

D’Amico said his fitness centers have complied with other coronavirus-related all of the Health regulations, keeping the facilities clean and screening staff and customers for COVID-19 symptoms. Health officials told them that some visitors to the fitness centers had tested positive for COVID, but they inspected the facilities and found no problems, he said.

“We have a bunch of customers, and a lot of new members are signing up,” Stephen Couture, the manager of the Lincoln club, said Wednesday.

D’Amico

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fitness

Walz to close bars, restaurants, fitness centers for 4 weeks

Gov. Tim Walz has ordered a four-week shutdown of bars, restaurants, entertainment venues and fitness clubs, starting Friday, to slow the COVID-19 pandemic that has caused more than 3,000 deaths in Minnesota and threatens to overwhelm hospital capacity.

The governor on Wednesday also ordered a pause on amateur sports and limited social gatherings to individual households — down from a cap imposed last week of 10 people from three households.

While Minnesotans are weary of the pandemic, and endured a broader 51-day state shutdown last spring, Walz said this latest order could keep more Minnesotans healthy and more hospital beds available until a vaccine becomes available.

“I know that hospitalizations are going to continue to go up for the next few weeks and I know that the death numbers will continue to go up for the next few weeks,” Walz said. “But the bright spot of this is, the moves we take now will start to bend that at just the time when the potential for a vaccine is coming. That’s what’s different, Minnesota, this time.”

Walz attempted a targeted response last week by restricting the sizes of wedding and funeral receptions and ordering bars and restaurants to close everything but takeout service by 10 p.m. The goal was to focus on group gathering locations where large outbreaks have occurred, but Walz and state Health Commissioner Jan Malcolm said rapid changes in the pandemic forced broader action.

“Two weeks ago, I thought a 5,000-case day was horrific,” Malcolm said. “Now, that looks like a good day.”

In the eight days since that last order, Minnesota saw roughly 52,000 more lab-confirmed infections and 312 more deaths — bringing the state’s totals to 242,043 infections and 3,010 deaths. The 1,706 COVID-19 hospitalizations in Minnesota on Wednesday represented a 31% increase.

Walz’s four-week order also applies to movie theaters, bowling alleys and museums. The Minneapolis Institute of Art and Walker Art Center, which had reopened to limited audiences in mid-July, will close Saturday; Mia said it would open no earlier than Jan. 2.

Retail outlets are unaffected, along with salons, as Walz said state contact tracing has found little evidence that they are responsible for large outbreaks. Religious ceremonies also are unaffected along with weddings and funerals themselves, but celebrations and receptions are subject to the shutdown. And while bars and restaurants will be closed to in-person service, they can still provide takeout, drive-through and delivery service. Only five customers will be allowed inside an establishment at any one time to pick up orders.

Walz and health officials chose four weeks because that reflects two infection cycles with the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19 — given its incubation period of up to 14 days. If people comply, Malcolm said the measures should level off the state infection rate and the positivity rate of diagnostic testing. Right now, 15.3% of tests turn up positive.

Walz said “the data will drive our decision” whether to end the restrictions at four weeks or extend them. Minnesota

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Walz to temporarily close bars, restaurants and fitness centers as COVID-19 cases surge

Gov. Tim Walz will impose new restrictions on bars, restaurants and fitness centers starting Friday, closing them down to the public four weeks as COVID-19 cases surge across the state.

Bars and restaurants will still be allowed to offer takeout services during that time, according to a source with knowledge of the restrictions. The new restrictions will also include a temporary pause on youth sports activities.

Walz will deliver an address to Minnesotans at 6 p.m. Wednesday to discuss the latest steps in his response to COVID-19.

The restrictions come days after the governor implemented a 10 p.m. curfew for bars and restaurants and put restrictions on bar seating and games.

But Minnesota health officials have warned the state is heading to a dangerous phase of the pandemic. On Tuesday, the state reported 26 new COVID-19 deaths and 5,945 new coronavirus infections, with 1,669 people with COVID-19 occupying inpatients beds in Minnesota and 346 needing intensive care — a record number of hospitalizations.

Republicans in the Legislature are asking Walz to announce the new restrictions immediately to help restaurants and bars plan for the changes.

“Minnesotans recognize how grave the situation is with COVID-19 spreading uncontrolled throughout the state,” said Rep. Dave Baker, R-Willmar. “We’re ready to do our part for our health care workers, no matter how difficult the coming weeks will be, and prevent a capacity crisis for our hospitals and health care facilities. But we need to do this together with transparency.”

Briana Bierschbach • 612-673-4689

———

©2020 the Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

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fitness

Walz to close bars, restaurants and fitness centers for 4 weeks

Gov. Tim Walz will impose new restrictions on bars, restaurants and fitness centers starting Friday, closing them down to the public for four weeks as COVID-19 cases surge across the state.

Bars and restaurants will still be allowed to offer takeout services during that time, according to a source with knowledge of the restrictions. The new restrictions will also include a temporary pause on youth sports.

Walz will deliver an address to Minnesotans at 6 p.m. Wednesday to discuss the latest steps in his response to COVID-19.

The closures come days after the governor implemented a 10 p.m. curfew for bars and restaurants and put restrictions on bar seating and games.

But Minnesota health officials have warned the state is heading to a dangerous phase of the pandemic. On Tuesday, the state reported 26 new COVID-19 deaths and 5,945 new coronavirus infections, with 1,669 people with COVID-19 occupying inpatients beds in Minnesota and 346 needing intensive care — a record number of hospitalizations.

Republicans in the Legislature are asking Walz to announce the new restrictions immediately to help restaurants and bars plan for the changes.

“Minnesotans recognize how grave the situation is with COVID-19 spreading uncontrolled throughout the state,” said Rep. Dave Baker, R-Willmar. “We’re ready to do our part for our health care workers, no matter how difficult the coming weeks will be, and prevent a capacity crisis for our hospitals and health care facilities. But we need to do this together with transparency.”

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health

“We’re Going to Stay Open, We’re Not the Problem,” Says Gym Owner Refusing to Close His Doors for Lockdown 2

From Thursday evening England will be thrown into another national lockdown, with non-essential shops, hospitality venues and gyms closing their doors to the public once more to help fight the spread of the coronavirus.



a young man taking a selfie: As we approach lockdown 2.0, the owner of independent gym Gainz Bedford has produced a two-page document fighting his case


© Provided by Men’s Health UK
As we approach lockdown 2.0, the owner of independent gym Gainz Bedford has produced a two-page document fighting his case

However, many commentators have argued the move could cripple the economy, put businesses out of action permanently and harm the health of a nation. These arguments will, undoubtedly, fall on deaf ears, but one gym owner is taking a stand and making sure his voice is heard.

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Alex Lowndes, who runs independent gym Gainz Bedford, posted a video on his Instagram page explaining why his doors will remain open from Thursday evening, pointing out how health and fitness, and encouraging people to work out, is part of the solution and not the problem when it comes to the pandemic.

“We have done a lot of thinking and we have decided that we are actually going to stay open,” he said in the video.

“The reasons for that are laid out in a document that we have prepared, which is two full pages, contains a lot of facts, a lot of relevant information.

“No this isn’t Liverpool, this isn’t Tier 3, this is national lockdown.

“The same arguments apply, the same logic, the same facts. Gyms are part of the solution here, not part of the problem. We need to be allowed to stay open. We are going to stay open. We hope that becomes legal in time.”

The document released by Gainz Bedford argues that boosting the immune system through exercises is of “paramount” importance during the pandemic. With numerous studies highlighting how obesity heightens the risk of covid-19 and potentially worsening the effects of the virus, the gym owner’s argument isn’t without merit.

“We all know that obesity is the biggest co-morbidity when it comes to Covid, and what has the government done about this? Absolutely NOTHING. In fact, they subsided fast food, so that people could buy cheeseburgers for 45p.

“Why not invest in educating people on nutrition, encouraging physical exercise? Perhaps a VAT cut on running shoes, bicycles, gym memberships. Closing gyms goes against the science in every way possible.”

From Thursday evening, it will be illegal for gyms to remain open, and anyone caught breaching the rules could face a hefty fine.

According to Test and Trace data however, gyms were responsible for just 3% of coronavirus infections in October. From 20,766 public infections, gyms accounted for just 620.

Worried about the gyms closing? Our bodyweight and limited-equipment workouts have got you covered.

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U.S. adds 73K more cases; Dr. Anthony Fauci says end of COVID-19 ‘not even close’

Oct. 28 (UPI) — The United States’ top infectious diseases expert says the COVID-19 pandemic isn’t even close to being finished, as another 73,000 cases were added nationwide — bringing the tally for the past week well over a half-million.

There were about 73,200 new cases on Tuesday, according to updated data from Johns Hopkins University. Over the past seven days, there have been about 503,000 new cases.

There were nearly 1,000 coronavirus deaths Tuesday, the most in a week, the data showed.

“Unfortunately, we’re right now in the middle of what’s going to be referred to … as the mother of all outbreaks over the last hundred years,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, the longtime director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said during a discussion at the Yale Institute for Global Health.

“And we’re not even close to being finished with it yet.”

For weeks, Fauci and other top health experts have warned of rising cases in the coming months as the pandemic enters a period of colder weather, when more people gather indoors, and flu season.

Fauci said he’d hoped the United States would use the summer to get a better grip on the health crisis before the winter months, but said “we are not well positioned” to handle the outbreak over the next few months.

“We need to continue with masks, safe distancing, and the other public health measures that we are adhering to now for at least a year,” he added.

Since the start of the pandemic, there have been 8.78 million infections and about 226,800 deaths in the United States, according to Johns Hopkins. Worldwide, there have been 44 million cases and almost 1.2 million deaths.

Tuesday, President Donald Trump listed “ending the pandemic” as one of the accomplishments of his first term.

“From the outset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the administration has taken decisive actions to engage scientists and health professionals in academia, industry, and government to understand, treat, and defeat the disease,” the White House said in a statement.

Trump has repeatedly clashed with scientists, including Fauci, and dismissed their proposals and advice for controlling the crisis. Trump has also consistently ignored safety guidelines like distancing and wearing masks at a number of gatherings at the White House and on the campaign trail.

Fauci has previously said mixed messages coming from the Trump administration about the pandemic has been a major obstacle in defeating the coronavirus.

“I am very disturbed by the intensity of divisiveness we are seeing,” Fauci told the Yale Institute for Global Health. “I have received serious threats to my life, there are federal agents guarding my office.”

In Wisconsin, health officials reported a record Tuesday for deaths in a single day. The state’s positivity rate has risen to about 26%. They also say hospitals are becoming overwhelmed and facing staff shortages.

“There is no way to sugarcoat it, we are facing an urgent crisis and there is an imminent risk to you and your family

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health

Close to ‘exponential spread’ in some parts of the US, former FDA official says

The country is facing another cycle of the Covid-19 pandemic, and it may be the hardest yet, former Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb said Monday.



a car parked on a city street filled with lots of traffic: People wait in their cars at a newly opened mega drive-thru site at SISD Student Activities Complex on July 21, 2020 in El Paso, Texas. As coronavirus deaths surge past 4000 in Texas, overwhelmed hospitals are being forced to plan for extra refrigerated storage to hold deceased patients. (Photo by Cengiz Yar/Getty Images)


© Cengiz Yar/Getty Images
People wait in their cars at a newly opened mega drive-thru site at SISD Student Activities Complex on July 21, 2020 in El Paso, Texas. As coronavirus deaths surge past 4000 in Texas, overwhelmed hospitals are being forced to plan for extra refrigerated storage to hold deceased patients. (Photo by Cengiz Yar/Getty Images)

“I think we’re right now at the cusp of what’s going to be exponential spread in parts of the country,” Gottlieb said on CNBC’s “Squawk Box.”

“If we took aggressive steps right now, we could potentially forestall the worst of it, but we’re not going to do that,” because there’s a lot of fatigue and “policy resistance to taking strong action,” he said.

“We really have two or three months of the acute phase of this pandemic to get through,” he said. “This is going to be the hardest phase, probably.”

Worst number of cases yet

That’s as the country continues to report the most number of cases we’ve seen to date. The seven-day average of daily new cases reached an all-time high of 68,767 on Sunday, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. The previous record of 67,293 was set July 22.

“Unfortunately, I think the statement about ‘new record’ is going to be repeated over and over again in the days and weeks to come,” said Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health.

“I expect that those numbers will continue to climb. Hospitalizations are going to continue to climb.”

The abysmal week was marked by the two worst days of daily new cases reported since the pandemic began. More than 83,000 new cases were reported both Friday and Saturday, according to Johns Hopkins.

To be clear: This surge reflects an onslaught of new infections — not just increased testing, contrary to what skeptics claim.

“You know why we have cases? Because we test so much,” President Donald Trump claimed at a rally Saturday in North Carolina. “And in many ways, it’s good. And in many ways, it’s foolish.”

But the seven-day average of new Covid-19 cases has soared 23% in the past week, according to Johns Hopkins data. The seven-day average of new tests performed has risen only 2.87% over the past week, according to the Covid Tracking Project.

And we are long past the point of just urban, heavily populated areas being the only places hit hard. South Dakota’s test positivity rate is 23%, the state’s health department said Monday. That means of every 100 people tested, 23 have been infected. The World Health Organization in May advised governments not to reopen until test positivity rates were 5% or lower for at least 14 days.

States to receive 36.7 million rapid tests

The federal government is shipping 36.7 million rapid Covid-19 tests, and states should be

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health

Group sees 14% increase in child Covid-19 cases with close to 800,000 US kids infected

The group, which represents pediatricians, says about 792,188 children have been infected in the US as of October 22. According to Johns Hopkins University, more than 8.6 million Americans have been infected with the novel coronavirus.

The AAP said 94,555 new child cases were reported from October 8 to October 22.

Severe illness and deaths from Covid-19 are still rare among children. As of October 22, children represented between 1% and 3.6% of total hospitalizations, depending on the state. Between 0.6% and 6.9% of all child Covid-19 cases resulted in hospitalization and in states that reported the information, up to 0.15% of all children with Covid-19 died. Sixteen states reported no child deaths.

The AAP said it started collecting this data in the absence of regular releases of information from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The CDC provides a national number of cases by age in its data tracker, but the age data isn’t released on a regular schedule. The AAP reports on numbers of cases among children weekly.

With the CDC numbers it is also hard to know where the cases are coming from, as there are no geographic indicators provided with the CDC’s age data.

What you need to know about coronavirus on Monday, October 26

The AAP’s count is not totally complete, because not all states report data in the same way. The cases are likely undercounted, according to the organization. These numbers come from 49 states, New York City, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and Guam. A smaller subset of states report information about hospitalizations and deaths by age.

The AAP recommends that children wear masks, avoid large crowds and keep a healthy distance from others. It also suggests all children 6 months or older get a flu shot. Pediatricians say it’s even more important than ever to get a flu shot before the end of October.

With two respiratory diseases circulating at the same time –flu and coronavirus — will be confusing to doctors, parents and caregivers. Plus, hospitals and clinics could be overwhelmed with the double burden.

As another wave of the pandemic approaches, the nation's food banks are being hit on three fronts
The two viruses cause similar symptoms but a study published September in JAMA Network Open found that children hospitalized with Covid-19 were more likely to have fever, aches, diarrhea and vomiting than were children with the flu.
Children with Covid-19 also tended to be older and have at least one underlying health condition. Babies under a year old with certain underlying conditions such as asthma or diabetes may also be more likely to have severe illness from Covid-19.
Covid-19 and seasonal flu in children led to similar rates of hospitalization, intensive care admission, and need for a ventilator to help breathing, the study found. The CDC says 189 children died from flu over the 2019-2020 season.

Source Article

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health

Quarantine List, Dorchester To Close Schools

MARYLAND — This week Maryland saw an increase in coronavirus cases as testing ramped up. Results from more than 30,000 tests were reported by state health officials Sunday, capping off a week in which one school system closed its buildings, citing increasing coronavirus positivity rates, and three states added Maryland to their quarantine lists because of the number of new cases.

Nearly 800 cases of coronavirus were added to Maryland’s tally Sunday morning, marking the fourth consecutive day of at least 700 cases reported in the state.

The state’s coronavirus positivity rate is 3.17 percent on a seven-day rolling average, according to the Maryland Department of Health, which is comparable to last week’s 3.14 percent positivity rate. It remains under 5 percent, which is the recommended benchmark positivity rate for reopening established by the World Health Organization.

Cases Reported This Week

  • Sunday, Oct. 25 — 792 cases

  • Saturday, Oct. 24 — 796 cases

  • Friday, Oct. 23 — 712 cases

  • Thursday, Oct. 22 — 743 cases

  • Wednesday, Oct. 21 — 492 cases

  • Tuesday, Oct. 20 — 590 cases

  • Monday, Oct. 19 — 497 cases

More than 140,200 people in Maryland have tested positive for the virus, state health officials reported Sunday.

Prince George’s County has the most cases in Maryland, with 32,225 overall as of Sunday, according to the Maryland Department of Health. Next is Montgomery County with 25,147 total cases of the virus, followed by Baltimore County with 20,208 and Baltimore City with 17,440.

Montgomery County added over 100 new cases daily 10 times in two weeks, according to state health officials.

On the Eastern Shore, Dorchester County Public Schools closed its school buildings after an increase in coronavirus positivity in the district. The positivity rate was 6.1 percent in Dorchester County, according to the school system’s superintendent, who reported Wednesday, Oct. 21, the district had reassessed its plans.

“Over the last six days the Dorchester County community has seen an increase in its COVID-19 positivity rate,” Superintendent Dave Bromwell said in a statement Oct. 21. “The positivity rate has increased exponentially to make Dorchester County the 3rd highest in the state of Maryland over this short period of time.”

As a result of the metrics, Dorchester County was returning to phase one of its reopening effective Tuesday, Oct. 27.

A recent spike in coronavirus infections prompted three states to put Maryland on its list of state with quarantine orders.

When travelers from Maryland head to Connecticut, New Jersey or New York, they will have to self-isolate for 14 days.

As long as Maryland averages more than 604 coronavirus cases a day in a seven-day period, it will remain on the list of troubled states. Those on the list have a positive case rate higher than 10 per 100,000 residents in the last seven days.

Here is data on coronavirus in Maryland for Sunday, Oct. 25, from the state health department:

Courtesy of Maryland Department of Health.
Courtesy of Maryland Department of Health.

Related:

Jacob Baugmart contributed to this report.

This article originally appeared

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health

Pence to continue campaigning after ‘close contact’ staff contract coronavirus

Multiple senior aides to the vice president have recently tested positive for COVID-19

While a number of people in Mike Pence‘s inner circle recently tested positive for COVID-19, the vice president reportedly has no plans to cancel his scheduled campaign events with the General Election drawing within a week away.

Pence apparently does not plan to self-quarantine to be sure not to spread coronavirus under the guise of being an essential worker, should he have unknowingly contracted the virus from one of his staff members. He and his wife, Karen Pence, tested negative on Saturday and Sunday, as reported by The New York Times.

According to spokesman Devin O’Malley, Pence’s chief of staff Marc Short tested positive for the disease on Saturday. In addition to Short, four other members of his staff have also contracted the virus that has caused a global pandemic. Marty Obst, one of Pence’s advisors, also tested positive earlier this week, a person familiar with the matter said.

Vice President Mike Pence (AP Photo/Steve Cannon)
Vice President Mike Pence (AP Photo/Steve Cannon)

 “While Vice President Pence is considered a close contact with Mr. Short, in consultation with the White House Medical Unit, the vice president will maintain his schedule in accordance with the C.D.C. guidelines for essential personnel,” O’Malley stated.

Pence, under his role as second in command to President Donald Trump, is in charge of the White House Coronavirus Task Force.

READ MORE: Odell Beckham Jr. doesn’t think he can get COVID-19: ‘It’s mutual respect’

Despite these positive tests affecting people so near to him, Pence is choosing to continue traveling around the nation under his separate capacity as a vice presidential candidate and surrogate for the Trump reelection campaign, less than 10 days out from the Nov. 3 election. This comes weeks after Trump and First Lady Melania Trump contracted coronavirus earlier this month. The disease hospitalized the president for days.

Since the President’s diagnosis, it was reported that several other members of the Administration had contracted COVID-19. This includes former political advisor Kellyanne Conway, press secretary Kayleigh McEnany, policy advisor Stephen Miller and campaign manager Bill Stepien.

Questions surrounding the safety protocols at the White House concerning coronavirus have been raised heavily since it penetrated to heavily weeks ago. President Trump has also returned to holding public campaign rallies, and the Washington Post reported that during the first presidential debate against Democratic nominee Joe Biden, guests of Trump opted not to wear masks during the broadcast.

Pence plans to maintain an aggressive campaign schedule this week despite an apparent outbreak of the coronavirus among his senior aides, the White House says. O’Malley said the vice president and his wife “remain in good health.”

READ MORE: Fauci advocates mask mandate amid COVID-19 surge across US

Trump commented on Short early Sunday after his plane landed at Joint Base Andrews, outside Washington.

“I did hear about it just now,” he said. “And I think he’s quarantining. Yeah. I did hear

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