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Traditional Chinese Medicine Market is Driven by Rise in Popularity among Major Population from all Across the World

Global Traditional Chinese Medicine Market: Snapshot

In recent period, the major population from all across the world is inclined toward the use of traditional Chinese medicines. As a result, the traditional Chinese medicine market is experiencing notable expansion opportunities.

The traditional Chinese medicines are found to be helpful in protecting an individual’s cognitive health, maintaining their strength as well as flexibility. As a result, they are gaining popularity among major population from all across the world. This factor will drive the growth of the traditional Chinese medicine market in the years to come.

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TMR’s upcoming research report on the traditional Chinese medicine market focuses on providing in-depth study of diverse important factors shaping the future of this market. It includes study of challenges, drivers, restraints, and opportunities in the market for traditional Chinese medicine. Apart from this, the report delivers dependable data on shares, volume, and revenues of the market for traditional Chinese medicine. Thus, the report is a valuable handbook for all entities working in the traditional Chinese medicine market during the forecast period of 2020 to 2030.

The global traditional Chinese medicine market is segmented on the basis of various key factors such as product type, application, and region. Based on product type, the market for traditional Chinese medicine is bifurcated into Chinese herbal medicine and acupuncture and Tai Chi.

Global Traditional Chinese Medicine Market: Growth Dynamics

The traditional Chinese medicine market is witnessing prominent growth avenues on the back of increased acceptance from various developed and developing countries. The world is witnessing noteworthy growth in the number of older populace. This factor is pushing the market growth. This aside, the improved disposable income of major people in the world is expected to drive the growth of the traditional Chinese medicine market.

Growing urbanization, technological advancements in healthcare sector, and presence of favorable health insurance policies are some of the key factors stimulating the growth opportunities in the traditional Chinese medicine market. This aside, presence of favorable government policies will support the growth of the market for traditional Chinese medicine in the years ahead.

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Global Traditional Chinese Medicine Market: Notable Development and Competitive Analysis

The traditional Chinese medicine market witnesses presence of gamut of players. As a result, the competitive landscape of the market for traditional Chinese medicine is highly intense. To sustain in this scenario, gamut of vendors working in this market are executing diverse strategies. Many players are growing their expenditure on research and development activities. This aside, many vendors are engaged in the launch of new products. All these activities connote that the traditional Chinese medicine market will experience remarkable growth in the upcoming years.

The list of key players in the traditional Chinese medicine market includes:

  • Apicare Pain Clinic
  • Tongrentang Hospital
  • Beijing Chinese Medicine Hospital
  • Dongzhimen Hospital
  • Beijing Hua Kang Hospital
  • Mayo Clinic
  • YinOvaCenter and WOTCM

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medicine

Understanding traditional Chinese medicine can help protect species

Demystifying traditional Chinese medicine for conservationists could be the key to better protecting endangered species like pangolins, tigers and rhino, according to University of Queensland-led researchers.

UQ PhD candidate Hubert Cheung said efforts to shift entrenched values and beliefs about Chinese medicine are not achieving conservation gains in the short term.

He said a better understanding of traditional practices was critical for conservationists to form more effective strategies.

“The use of endangered species in traditional Chinese medicine threatens species’ survival and is a challenge for conservationists,” Mr Cheung said.

“Pushing messages of inefficacy, providing various forms of scientific evidence or promoting biomedical alternatives doesn’t seem to be drastically influencing decisions and behaviours.

“And, although many practices and treatments continue to be criticised for lacking scientific support, the World Health Organization approved the inclusion of traditional Chinese medicine in its global compendium of medical practices last year.

“The challenge now is for conservationists to work proactively with practitioners and others in the industry to find sustainable solutions.

“However, most conservation scientists and organisations are unfamiliar with traditional Chinese medicine, which makes it difficult to devise effective and culturally-nuanced interventions.”

The researchers have examined the core theories and practices of traditional Chinese medicine, in a bid to make it more accessible.

They hope their study – and the nuances within – will influence policy and campaigning.

“Today, traditional Chinese medicine is formally integrated into China’s healthcare system, and has been central to China’s response to the ongoing pandemic,” Mr Cheung said.

“In fact, the Chinese government’s COVID-19 clinical guidance has included recommendations for the use of a product containing bear bile, which has raised concerns among conservation groups.”

UQ’s Professor Hugh Possingham said traditional Chinese medicine was now not only entrenched in the social and cultural fabric of Chinese society, but also gaining users elsewhere.

“A better understanding of traditional Chinese medicine will empower conservationists to engage more constructively with stakeholders in this space,” Professor Possingham said.

“We’re hoping that this work can help all parties develop more effective and lasting solutions for species threatened by medicinal use.”

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Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.

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medicine

A review of Traditional Chinese herbal medicine in management of COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has infected over 59.65 million people worldwide and claimed the lives of over 1.4 million. The virus, first detected in late December 2019 in Wuhan, China, is the most significant public health problem since the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic. There are no effective and safe drugs that can be used to treat COVID-19 disease nor vaccine to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection. Since the first cases were detected in Wuhan, several traditional Chinese herbal medicines have been used to treat this infection.

Now researchers led by David Lee from Bio-Organic and Natural Research Laboratory, McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Belmont have summarized the experiences with the use of traditional Chinese herbal medicines for the management of COVID-19. Their study titled, “Traditional Chinese herbal medicine at the forefront battle against COVID-19: Clinical experience and scientific basis,” was published in the January 2021 issue of the journal Phytomedicine.

Study: Traditional Chinese herbal medicine at the forefront battle against COVID-19: Clinical experience and scientific basis. Image Credit: Dragon Images / Shutterstock

Background

China has a rich history of traditional herbal medicines. Traditional Chinese herbal medicine (TCM) has been used for over 5,000 in over 300 epidemics that the nation has faced. When the COVID-19 pandemic emerged early this year, treatment with TCM was reported to have been used with over 90 percent efficacy.

Study particulars

This study was a systematic review of several traditional Chinese herbal medicines that were used in Wuhan,  looking at their efficacy in the management of COVID-19. At present, patients admitted to hospitals (except TCM hospitals) are primarily treated with western medicine as frontline treatment.

Principles of TCM use

The western medications used include antibiotics and painkillers. At present, over 100 herbal TCM formulae are available for use in epidemic related infections. Authors write, “TCM is now credited for the successful battle against COVID-19 in China”.

The ancient Chinese medical text Huangdi Neijing explains that 12 meridian lines run through the human body and help balance the immune system and provide good health. The lung meridian line interconnects with the large intestine functionally and controls the body fluid (water). The researchers write, “Expelling phlegm and relaxing the bowels with laxatives are common methods for treating lung diseases. Therefore, maintaining a smooth and open channel is an important function served by the lung meridian line.” Treatment of COVID-19 is basically to “expel the toxic moisture from the upper respiratory system and to improve intestinal obstruction.” They added that the TCM method of treatment tries to maintain the balance of the lung meridian system and to restore the lung and large intestine balance using acupuncture and herbal medicine.

Treatment of COVID-19 using TCM

TCM has been used as a first-line treatment for COVID-19 disease since the emergence of SARS-CoV-2. Qingfei Paidu decoction for example, has been used in a three-day course leading to an over 90 percent efficacy.

The team of researchers wrote, “The Chinese government announced that TCM is one of the recommended therapeutic options for the treatment of COVID-19 in the third version COVID-19 treatment guidelines, published on January

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medicine

Chinese herbal medicine launched in Philippines


Chinese herbal medicine launched in Philippines

Sheila Crisostomo (The Philippine Star) – November 25, 2020 – 12:00am

MANILA, Philippines — A Chinese herbal medicine designed to relieve influenza symptoms such as those of COVID-19 was officially launched in the Philippines on Monday.

According to Philippine Archipelago International Trading Corp. (PAITC) president Olivia Limpe-Aw, the Lianhua Qingwen capsule is the first traditional Chinese medicine registered by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) under the “pharmacological category.”

“This a landmark registration? The COVID-19 pandemic has brought to fore the importance of TCM (traditional Chinese medicine) and, in particular, the significant role of Lianhua Qingwen in the treatment of COVID-19,” she noted in a webinar.

Aw added the medicine is now available at selected drugstores in the Philippines, but it will be accessible at more outlets soon.

She said the entry of Lianhua Qingwen in the country “will be a big help to our countrymen.”

AIf thereIs a silver lining to this COVID-19 pandemic, itss the awareness for traditional Chinese medicine and the provision for effective, safe and affordable treatment,s she maintained.

Approval

In August, the Chinese embassy in the Philippines had announced that the FDA had approved the application for registration of Lianhua Qingwen as a “traditional medicine.”

An embassy statement showed the product is manufactured by “one of China’s renowned Traditional Chinese Medicine manufacturers, Shijiazhuang Yiling Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd.”

In China, the Lianhua Qingwen capsule is an approved treatment for mild and moderate cases of COVID-19.

Based on Lianhua Qingwen’s certificate for product registration (CPR) issued by the FDA, the medicine “helps remove heat-toxin invasion of the lungs, including symptoms such as fever, aversion to cold, muscle soreness, stuffy and runny nose.”

The product can be procured in the Philippines with a doctor’s prescription.

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medicine

Compounds in traditional Chinese medicine herbs may inhibit SARS-CoV-2 infection

Using computational methods, a team of researchers identified three compounds in traditional Chinese medicine that could be used against SARS-CoV-2: quercetin, puerarin and kaempferol​.  Of the three compounds, quercetin showed the highest binding affinity to both the ACE2 receptor and the receptor-binding domain of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, and could thus provide a dual synergistic effect.  

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the causative pathogen of the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, infects human hosts by binding with the human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor on their cells, notably the epithelium lining the respiratory tract. The receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the coronavirus spike protein binds to ACE2 followed by membrane fusion to the host cell, thus allowing the virus to infiltrate the cell and commence replication.

Traditional Chinese medicine, widely used for many diseases, showed therapeutic effects during the 2003 SARS-CoV epidemic. The RBD of the SARS-CoV-2 has significant structural homology with SARS-CoV. Although the use of Chinese herbs with modern medicine has shown benefits in COVID-19 patients, several components are present in the herbs and have complex interactions, making it challenging to uncover the molecular mechanisms responsible for its therapeutic effects.

Study: Chinese herbal compounds against SARS-CoV-2: puerarin and quercetin impair the binding of viral S-protein to ACE2 receptor. Image Credit: Dragon Images / Shutterstock

Several computational studies have helped predict active compounds in the medicinal herbs with the potential to accelerate traditional medicine-based drug discovery.

Finding potential compounds against SARS-CoV-2

Researchers from various institutions in China used computational analysis to discover potential molecule candidates against SARS-CoV-2 infection. Using the Traditional Chinese Medicine Pharmacology database, they screened for molecules that could target ACE2.

They identified the compound puerarin that could target ACE2. Then, they screened for Chinese herbs that have this compound in the database and found five. Furthermore, since it is thought that compounds in the same herbal medicine have synergistic properties, they expanded their search to include all the compounds in the five herbs to arrive at 41 compounds.

Upon analyzing which compounds were present in the maximum number of herbs, they found puerarin was present in all the five herbs, and quercetin and kaempferol were present in three herbs. Next, they predicted potential drug targets of the selected compounds using the database, leading to 240 possible targets. Upon further analysis, they selected puerarin, quercetin, and kaempferol for further study.

Next, the authors performed molecular docking analysis to determine potential binding sites and binding affinity to ACE2. All the three compounds could bind on the same region of ACE2, which is located some distance from the binding position of SARS-CoV-2. It is likely the compounds are causing changes in conformations rather than competing with the spike protein to bind to ACE2. Quercetin had the highest binding affinity, forming both strong and weak hydrogen bonds.

Quercetin could bind to RBD domain of S-protein with a high binding affinity. (A) Hydrophilic-hydrophobic interaction between (i) quercetin and SARS-CoV-2 Spike in candidate protein binding pocket, and (ii) quercetin and relative amino acids. (B) The KD of the SARS-CoV-2 Spike RBD protein with a series of concentrations of quercetin was calculated by SPR.

Quercetin could bind to RBD domain of S-protein with a high binding affinity. (A) Hydrophilic-hydrophobic interaction between (i) quercetin and SARS-CoV-2 Spike in candidate protein binding pocket, and (ii) quercetin and relative amino acids. (B) The KD of the SARS-CoV-2 Spike RBD protein with a series of concentrations of quercetin was calculated by SPR.

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medicine

UH professor is developing a Chinese herbal medicine formula to improve cancer therapy

University of Houston professor of pharmaceutics Ming Hu is developing and testing an ancient Chinese herbal medicine formula, first described in 280 A.D., to improve cancer therapy. Hu believes Xiao-Chai-Hu Tang (XCHT) can protect people on the chemotherapy drug Irinotecan from a deadly side effect: Severe-delayed-onset diarrhea (SDOD).

The clinical use of Irinotecan is severely limited by the severe diarrhea that results in poor quality of life, hospitalization and even death. Our goal with XCHT is to allow more people to benefit from the treatment by Irinotecan, which is often the drug of last resort for late stage or metastatic cancer patients.”


Ming Hu, the Diana S-L. Chow Endowed Professor of Drug Discovery and Development at UH

Hu and colleagues Romi Ghose, associate professor of pharmaceutics at UH and Song Gao of Texas Southern University, have been awarded $996,162 from the National Cancer Institute to investigate the effectiveness of the ancient formula. They will also work with Lijun Zhu of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine in China to determine the agent’s effectiveness in a clinical trial.

To be sure, Irinotecan is a powerful weapon against cancer, but many of those who take it develop SDOD, likely caused by SN-38, the active metabolite of the drug. In the intestine, SN-38 can damage intestinal cells and affect their renewal.

“Intestinal cells have UGT enzymes that detoxify SN-38, but we found that SN-38 can also inactivate and reduce UGT enzymes in the intestine. This creates a vicious cycle. Approximately 1-in-5 patients will fall into this vicious cycle, leading to discontinuation of therapy, decreased efficacy or even death,” said Hu. He has shown that XCHT protects the UGT enzymes and reduces severe diarrhea, and with the new grant he will develop it further, for testing and approvals.

XCHT is actively used in China, Japan and Korea for liver protection. This is the first instance where it has been shown to protect the intestine from SN-38, making the UGT enzymes more resistant to the impact of SN-38.

“Our long-term goal is to develop experimental therapeutics and/or nutritional supplemental approaches to reduce SDOD, so patients can sustain their chemotherapy,” said Hu.

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medicine

Sports Medicine Device Market Insights (2020 to 2025) – Analysis and Forecast for the Global and Chinese Markets – Press Release

Dublin, Nov. 02, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The “Sports Medicine Device Market Insights 2020, Analysis and Forecast Global and Chinese Market to 2025, by Manufacturers, Regions, Technology, Product Type” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

This report is a professional and in-depth study on the current state of the global Sports Medicine Device market with a focus on the Chinese market. The report provides key statistics on market of Sports Medicine Device. It is a valuable source of guidance and direction for companies and individuals interested in Sports Medicine Device industry.

Key points of Sports Medicine Device Market Report:
1. The report provides a basic overview of Sports Medicine Device industry including: definition, applications and manufacturing technology.
2. The report explores Global and Chinese major players in Sports Medicine Device market. In this part, the report presents the company profile, product specifications, capacity, production value, and 2015-2020 market shares for each company.
3. The report depicts the global and Chinese total Sports Medicine Device market including: capacity, production, production value, cost/profit, supply/demand and Chinese import/export, by statistical analysis.
4. The global Sports Medicine Device market is further divided by company, by country, and by application/type for the competitive landscape analysis.
5. The report then estimates 2020-2025 development trends, analyse upstream raw materials, downstream demand, and current market dynamics of Sports Medicine Device market.
6. The report makes some important proposals for a new project of Sports Medicine Device Industry before evaluating its feasibility.
7. Overall, the report provides an in-depth insight of 2015-2025 global and Chinese Sports Medicine Device market covering all important parameters.

Main Parameters for this report:

Type Segment:

Companies Covered:

  • Arthrex
  • Smith & Nephew
  • Stryker
  • Depuy Synthes/Johnson & Johnson
  • Zimmer Biomet
  • Karl Storz
  • Conmed
  • Wright
  • Medshape
  • Valeris
  • Rog
  • Aceosteo
  • Asco Medical
  • Atlas Surgical
  • Auxein
  • Biotek
  • Bonetech Medisys
  • CHM
  • Egifix
  • Forerunner
  • Fxorthopedi
  • Gesco Medical
  • GPC Medical Ltd
  • Green Surgical
  • Griphorto
  • Hardik International
  • HIBS
  • Innomed Solutions
  • Jeil Medical
  • Jiangsu Bai De Medical Instrument
  • Marapole
  • Matrix
  • Medgal
  • Microport
  • Miraclus
  • Narang
  • Naton Group
  • Nebula

Key Topics Covered:

1.: Introduction of Sports Medicine Device Industry
1.1 Brief Introduction of Sports Medicine Device
1.2 Development of Sports Medicine Device Industry
1.3 Status of Sports Medicine Device Industry

2.: Manufacturing Technology of Sports Medicine Device
2.1 Development of Sports Medicine Device Manufacturing Technology
2.2 Analysis of Sports Medicine Device Manufacturing Technology
2.3 Trends of Sports Medicine Device Manufacturing Technology

3.: Analysis of Global Key Manufacturers
3.1 Arthrex
3.1.1 Company Profile
3.1.2 Product Information
3.1.3 Capacity Production Price Cost Production Value
3.1.4 Contact Information
3.2 Smith & Nephew
3.2.1 Company Profile
3.2.2 Product Information
3.2.3 Capacity Production Price Cost Production Value
3.2.4 Contact Information
3.3 Stryker
3.3.1 Company Profile
3.3.2 Product Information
3.3.3 Capacity Production Price Cost Production Value
3.3.4 Contact Information
3.4 Depuy Synthes/Johnson & Johnson
3.4.1 Company Profile
3.4.2 Product Information
3.4.3 Capacity Production Price Cost Production Value
3.4.4 Contact Information
3.5 Zimmer Biomet
3.5.1 Company Profile
3.5.2 Product Information
3.5.3 Capacity Production Price Cost Production Value
3.5.4 Contact Information
3.6 Karl

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medicine

Chinese medicine regulator to review EdiGene’s therapy for blood disorders

Pakistani patient suffering from thalassemia receives blood at a medical center on the World Thalassemia Day in Islamabad, Pakistan, on May 8, 2018. Thalassemia, also called Mediterranean anemia, is an inherited and non-infectious blood disorder. (Xinhua/Ahmad Kamal)

The China National Medical Products Administration (NMPA) will review biotech company EdiGene’s investigational new drug (IND) application for ET-01, an investigational gene-editing therapy for patients with transfusion-dependent beta-thalassemia (an inherited blood disorder), according to the company’s website.

The trial of ET-01 is expected to assess its safety and efficacy in transfusion-dependent beta-thalassemia patients. In China, it is estimated that there are 30 million thalassemia gene carriers, and over 300,000 patients with thalassemia major or thalassemia intermediate. Serious unmet medical needs remain for transfusion-dependent beta-thalassemia patients today.

“We are happy to achieve this important milestone and bring ET-01 closer to clinical-use stage,” said Dong Wei, CEO of EdiGene. “We are committed to translating cutting-edge gene-editing technologies into transformative therapies so as to bring patients better choices, and for some, a potential one-time cure. We look forward to receiving approval from NMPA and initiating ET-01 clinical studies in the near future,” he added.

ET-01 is an investigational gene-edited hematopoietic stem cell therapy for transfusion dependent beta-thalassemia patients. 

EdiGene is a biotech company developing genome editing technologies to accelerate drug discovery and develop novel therapeutics for a wide range of illnesses.

Global Times

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health

Nicox’s NCX 470 Receives Approval by Chinese Authorities for Local Start of Mont Blanc Phase 3 Trial

 

October 26, 2020 – release at 7:30 am
Sophia Antipolis, France

 

Nicox SA (Euronext Paris: FR0013018124, COX), an international ophthalmology company, today announced that its partner, Ocumension Therapeutics, has received approval from China’s Center for Drug Evaluation of the National Medical Products Administration to carry out the Chinese part of the ongoing Mont Blanc trial, the first Phase 3 clinical trial on NCX 470 for the lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with open angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension.

 

NCX 470, Nicox’s lead clinical product candidate, is a novel second generation nitric oxide (NO)-donating bimatoprost analog exclusively licensed to Ocumension Therapeutics for the Chinese, Korean and South East Asian markets.

 

Dr. José Boyer, VP and Interim Head of R&D at Nicox, said: “We are pleased with this second Chinese IND approval in our collaboration with Ocumension.  NCX 470 development remains on track, with first results from the Mont Blanc trial expected in Q4 2021.  Initiation of Chinese sites in this trial will be essential in preparing the way for Denali, the second Phase 3 trial with NCX 470, which will include a larger number of Chinese patients.”

 

The Press Release by Ocumension can be found here:

The NCX 470 Mont Blanc Phase 3 clinical trial is a 3-month trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of NCX 470 ophthalmic solution, 0.1%, versus the current standard of care, latanoprost ophthalmic solution, 0.005%, for the lowering of IOP in patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension.  The Mont Blanc trial is expected to randomize approximately 670 patients, at around 50 clinical sites in the U.S. and at a small number of clinical sites in China.  The Mont Blanc trial was initiated in the U.S. in June 2020 and top-line results are currently expected in Q4 2021. 

Nicox and Ocumension will jointly fund the second NCX 470 Phase 3 glaucoma trial, Denali, which is expected to start by end of 2020 and will also evaluate NCX 470 ophthalmic solution, 0.1%, versus latanoprost ophthalmic solution, 0.005%.  The Denali trial will include clinical sites in both the U.S. and China, with the large majority of the patients to be recruited in the U.S.  The Denali trial was designed to fulfill the regulatory requirements to support New Drug Application (NDA) filings in the U.S. and China.

 

NCX 470 is a novel, potential best-in-class, second generation nitric oxide (NO)-donating bimatoprost analog in development to reduce intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension.  Glaucoma is a group of ocular diseases in which the optic nerve is injured, leading to peripheral and, ultimately, central visual field loss and it can eventually lead to blindness if not treated. It is frequently linked to abnormally high IOP (~90% of patients) due to blockage or malfunction of the eye’s aqueous humor drainage system in the front of the eye.  In 2019, worldwide sales of treatments targeting glaucoma were over $6.0 billion out of a $21.9 billion worldwide market for ophthalmic drugs. 

NCX 470 is designed

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health

Disparities Abound in Chinese Heart Attack Care

Continued quality improvement in acute MI may be possible in the U.S. given lessons learned from another country with major geographic and other disparities in acute MI care and mortality: China.

Rural hospitals and those with fewer resources showed opportunities for improved care in China, according to findings from two registries now published online in JAMA Network Open.

“Many researchers believe that we have solved the STEMI [ST-segment elevation MI] problem, but the improvement in mortality has plateaued and we have made very little progress in reperfusion times for patients transferred from a non-PCI [percutaneous coronary intervention] center or outcomes for those with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest or cardiogenic shock,” wrote Timothy Henry, MD, of The Christ Hospital, Cincinnati, and James Jollis, MD, of Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, North Carolina, in an accompanying commentary.

The two studies suggest the U.S. still has a lead over China in acute MI care — but will it be able to keep it? The U.S. has been hurt by a fracturing of the national acute MI registry into multiple competing registries, which poses challenges to regional collaboration and quality improvement, Henry and Jollis suggested.

Meanwhile, they wrote, “China has rapidly embraced the best quality improvement models of the U.S.” and is even poised to surpass the collaborative systems of care in the States.

Geographic Variation

China saw persistent regional variations in the use of reperfusion and guideline-recommended medical therapy, one group reported from registry data.

Despite the launch of national health care reform in 2009, hospitals in the country’s center were 17% less likely to provide MI treatments to eligible patients than centers in western areas in 2011-2015 (adjusted OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.76-0.91), according to Yingling Zhou, MD, PhD, of Guangdong Provincial People’s Hospital.

“In the present study, we observed significant differences in the use of guideline-recommended treatments across China, with hospitals in the Western region having the best performance, particularly for clopidogrel [Plavix], ACEIs/ARBs [angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers], and statins,” the research group said.

Zhou’s team noted that the western region is the least economically developed region in China and has been subject to special government investment in public health starting in the year 2000.

Eastern China also improved processes of MI care from 2001-2006 to 2011-2015.

Across the board, use of guideline-recommended treatments increased from 2001-2006 to 2011-2015, and there was some improvement in care variation, study authors said.

“However, care delivery remains suboptimal and disparities remained across China when compared with that in the United States and United Kingdom where reperfusion therapy, β-blockers, and ACEIs/ARBs are used at much higher rates. Additional measures should be taken to further narrow regional care disparity across the country,” Zhou and colleagues urged.

Their cross-sectional study was based on the Patient-Centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events–Retrospective AMI project. A random sampling yielded 27,046 patients hospitalized for acute MI at 153 hospitals across China.

The country was divided into three geographic regions: eastern, central, and western. There were marked regional variations

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