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medicine

How has medicine changed in the past 20 years? A look at dementia, cancer care and chronic disease

The 21st century began with the first draft of the human genome, and with it, the promise of immense new powers to treat, prevent and cure disease.

In high-income countries like Australia, rates of heart disease were falling, and life expectancy was rising.

Over the past two decades, lots has changed about the factors that affect our health, wellbeing and how long (and well) we live.

So what do we know now that we didn’t then, and how far have we come?

As part of Radio National’s Big 20 series, Dr Norman Swan speaks to three leaders in their field to find out what’s happened in dementia research, cancer care and chronic disease over the last 20 years.

Chronic disease has been getting worse

Dr Norman Swan talks to Professor Chris Murray, director of the Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington.

Dr Swan: Take us back to the year 2000. What was the pattern of disease?

Professor Chris Murray: In the year 2000, right before the big push globally on reducing health problems in low income settings, we were pretty much nearing the peak of the HIV epidemic and, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, we still had a very large number of deaths under age five — 12 million or so a year.

We hadn’t yet had the big efforts to control malaria. And many middle-income countries were right in that transition from a profile of disease burden dominated by infectious diseases and starting that shift towards cancer, heart disease, chronic kidney disease.

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Hear the full interviews with Dr Norman Swan on the Health Report podcast.

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In the high-income world — Australia, Europe, North America — the [disease burden] looked pretty similar. It was already heavily dominated by heart disease and cancer, chronic kidney disease, but there was less obesity back then, there was less diabetes, and we were still back in the heyday of heart disease coming down pretty rapidly.

Dr Swan: What has happened in the two decades since?

Professor Murray: We’ve seen really dramatic progress bringing down child death rates.

In a place like Niger in West Africa, the improvements are just spectacular. You’ve probably halved child death rates in that period … bringing [it] down below the 5 million mark because of antiretrovirals for HIV.

There has been real progress on controlling malaria because of bed-net programs. So just lots of progress racked up, until COVID, on a number of fronts in the low-income world.

Then at the other end of the spectrum in the high-income world, we’ve seen heart disease progress slow, and in some places reverse.

We’ve seen this steady rise of obesity and bringing with it diabetes, high blood sugar, bringing up blood pressure levels in some countries, despite all the therapies that exist for them.

In the middle-income world we’ve seen progress but we’ve seen the rise of ambient air pollution in the last two decades. It’s becoming a bigger and

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fitness

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Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article

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dentist

Can’t visit the dentist? Here’s how to take better care of your teeth

For many of us, the routine trip to the dentist is just one of the ways in which our lives have been disrupted in 2020. The British Dental Association (BDA) estimates that, since the March lockdown, dentists in England have provided nearly 19m fewer treatments than in the same period last year.



a close up of a person holding a toothbrush: Photograph: Daniel Day/Getty Images


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Daniel Day/Getty Images



Does it matter what type of brush or toothhpaste you use?


© Photograph: Daniel Day/Getty Images
Does it matter what type of brush or toothhpaste you use?

What do you need to know about dental emergencies, and what more can you do to care for your teeth? We asked the experts.

What dentistry services are currently available?

Although some routine dental treatments are now available again, in the UK, surgeries’ operating capacity has been reduced and some are triaging patients according to their level of need and risk.

If you would like to see your dentist, it is advisable to contact them by phone or email to see if it is necessary for you to visit. For up-to-date advice on accessing dental care in the UK, see the NHS website.

What is the risk of catching coronavirus at the dentist?

Although they are assumed to be at high risk of contracting Covid-19, a recent study of nearly 2,200 US dentists found that fewer than 1% tested positive in June. Professor Damien Walmsley, scientific adviser to the BDA, says dentists’ routine attention to infection control puts them at an advantage. “It’s almost second nature to us.”

A heightened potential risk of coronavirus transmission is in the use of instruments such as dental drills or ultrasonic scalers, which create a fine mist.

How are dentists adapting?

The profession is still adapting its procedures as more becomes known about how the virus spreads. For example, some dentists have switched to handheld tools that are slower, but create less spray. “Everything’s a bit of a compromise,” says Walmsley.

Access to services is improving. In England, the “fallow time” during which a treatment room must remain empty after any aerosol-generating procedure was recently reduced from an hour to 15-20 minutes (depending on ventilation), enabling dentists to see more patients.

What can I do to care for my teeth while I can’t get to a dentist?

“The majority of dental problems are preventable,” says Walmsley. Brushing your teeth in the morning and at night, for two minutes each time, will generally be enough to prevent tooth decay and gum disease. Studies have shown, however, that people brush for an average of 43 seconds. “Four minutes a day is not a lot to ask,” says Dr Nigel Carter, the chief executive of the Oral Health Foundation.



a person brushing the teeth: We should be brushing our teeth for two minutes twice a day. Photograph: 10’000 Hours/Getty Images


© Provided by The Guardian
We should be brushing our teeth for two minutes twice a day. Photograph: 10’000 Hours/Getty Images

What kind of toothpaste should I use?

Any toothpaste with fluoride will do. Not only does it help to prevent tooth decay, but it slows down the rate of progression of any existing decay. Carter is concerned by the increasing

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dentist

Lynnwood dentist says stress of COVID is grinding on patients, but routine care remains vital

Stress from the coronavirus pandemic has people gnashing their teeth and avoiding dental care.

LYNNWOOD, Wash. — The dentist’s office was a scary place for many people long before the coronavirus pandemic. For some, it’s even scarier now. 

People are avoiding dentists because they worry it isn’t safe — and that’s creating another set of health issues. 

The ongoing global pandemic is quite literally grinding people down to their breaking point.

“This patient said she started to notice herself clenching and grinding,” said Dr. Bradley Jonnes of Lynnwood’s Cedar View Dental, pointing to an X-ray. “She actually broke the tooth off at the gum line.”

Jonnes said, prior to the pandemic, he’d see a broken tooth every couple of weeks. Now he sees several a week.

“People come in and I ask them what changed, and they say, ‘Look at the world! It’s stress. I’m definitely clenching and grinding now.'”

Fear of contracting COVID-19 also has people putting off check-ups, turning small problems into big ones. Routine cavities can become root canals.

After dental offices across the country were completely shut down at the beginning of the pandemic, the American Dental Association changed its policy, designating check-ups as “essential” services.

When asked whether a check-up truly is “essential,” Jonnes responded, “That’s an interesting question. Sometimes we do a check-up and we find a lot more, so we can prevent a lot more. In some cases, it saves people time and money and pain and hassle by doing that check-up. We screen for oral cancer and other issues. We never know what we’re going to find until we get in there.”

Washington state is now allowing dentists to operate as they did prior to the pandemic with additional requirements, including screening of patients for symptoms and thorough cleaning of facilities.

Though not required, Jonnes uses a hand-held fogger to coat his office with a natural disinfectant every day.

He wears both an N95 and additional surgical mask during each procedure. A hospital grade air purification system filters the air in the office every 15 minutes.

“The good thing is, we now have a track record,” said Jonnes. “When we were first opening, we didn’t know how COVID and dentistry would be affected. Talking with my colleagues, the American Dental Association and the national association, we can see dental offices have been safe.”

The American Dental Association reports less than 1% of the nation’s 200,000 dentists have tested positive for coronavirus, compared to more than 200,000 health care workers who have been infected.

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fitness

Brooke Burke, 49, reveals how she’s staying in shape indoors: ‘I’ve always taken the best care of myself’

EXCLUSIVE: At age 49, mom of four Brooke Burke is feeling more confident than ever about her body.

The TV personality and former swimsuit model, who graced the cover of Playboy in 2004, has always been keen on taking care of herself, however, it wasn’t until her 40s that she fully understood her body. Now she’s not only achieving her wellness goals, but she’s also enjoying herself while she does it.

Burke has since taken what she’s learned, coupled with her lifelong passion for wellness, to uplift those looking to kickstart a new workout regimen through her app, Brooke Burke Body, which aims to offer various exercises that can be done indoors. 

The former “Dancing With the Stars” host, who has come up with clever ways to keep moving while practicing social distancing, insisted anyone can look forward to at-home fitness and develop a new appreciation for your body.

Burke spoke to Fox News about why staying in shape isn’t about sacrifice, how fasting is a part of her life, as well as what we’ll always find in her kitchen.

KELLY OSBOURNE SAYS SHE’S REJECTING MEN WHO WOULDN’T DATE HER PRE-WEIGHT LOSS

Brooke Burke has launched a fitness app called Brooke Burke Body.

Brooke Burke has launched a fitness app called Brooke Burke Body.
(Photo by Rich Polk/Getty Images for World of Children)

Fox News: You’re a Playboy cover veteran. Looking back, how did you physically prepare for those shoots?
Brooke Burke: I’ve always taken the best care of myself. I think being a swimsuit model and coming from that background, I was always very conscious. But to be really honest with you, it’s easier for me today in my 40s because I understand my body. I’ve come to understand how to be efficient with my time, how to tone, sculpt and train my body while enjoying life. 

It’s not at all about sacrifice. I tell women in my community that it’s essential to design a lifestyle that’s sustainable and something you will actually enjoy. That way you will use your time wisely. If you gave five minutes, 20 minutes or 45 minutes a day, there’s something for you to do at any age, any stage of your life. You have to learn what works for you, your body and time. It has to be sustainable. That’s how we can make a commitment and achieve our wellness goals.

Brooke Burke isn't shy about sharing her fitness secrets over the years.

Brooke Burke isn’t shy about sharing her fitness secrets over the years.
(Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images for Poise Pelvic Power Class)

It’s very common that people want to get into their bikinis for the summer or those extra five pounds for a special event. For me, it’s all about taking care of myself year-round. So I never really modified my lifestyle to prepare for something important. I think now I work out stronger and smarter as a mother of four and as a woman in my 40s, mostly because I understand the benefits from that that go way behind fitness. It’s more than just getting into the best shape of your life.

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medicine

VillageMD to Acquire Complete Care Medicine in Phoenix

PHOENIX and CHICAGO, Nov. 17, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — VillageMD announced today it will open a new Village Medical clinic in Phoenix at 1760 E. Pecos Road, Suite 115 in Gilbert, Az. This is the 28th Village Medical clinic and the eighth in the Phoenix area. Village Medical offers comprehensive primary care across a broad range of physician services, along with 24/7 care through telehealth and virtual care.  VillageMD plans to open another 17 Village Medical clinics in the Phoenix area by the summer 2021.  

VillageMD logo (PRNewsfoto/VillageMD)

“We’re thrilled to extend our primary care services to more patients in the Phoenix area. We’ve seen high demand in this region and we’re continuing to hire primary care providers who align with our goal of delivering the best patient experience,” said Brent Asplin, M.D., president of Village Medical. “Dr. Herrera and his team are well-respected in the Phoenix area generally, and is very well known in the community of Gilbert. We’re happy to offer our effective combination of high-tech and high-touch care to more patients.” 

Village Medical offers a comprehensive suite of primary care services including preventative care, treatment for illness and injury, and management of chronic conditions such as diabetes, chronic heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and kidney disease. Patients can make an appointment online here, and also learn more about the experienced providers in the Phoenix area. 

“I’m excited to join Village Medical, along with the five experienced providers on my team. We’re looking forward to welcoming new patients and introducing our loyal patients to our new location and offer an enhanced patient experience with Village Medical’s state-of-the-art technology,” said Michael Herrera, D.O., who is joining Village Medical.       

Village Medical patients will have access to same-day appointments and virtual health visits with a Village Medical provider. Additionally, Village Medical patients can take advantage of Village Medical at Home, which provides in-home primary care visits with experienced primary care providers. Village Medical patients also benefit from VillageMD’s patent-pending docOS™ operating platform, which integrates data and technology to give physicians a 360-degree view of their patients’ health profiles and can help identify gaps in care.

Village Medical also offers full-service, primary care in Atlanta and Houston and will enter several new markets in early 2021. To learn more, make an appointment or view all Village Medical locations, please visit www.villagemedical.com.  

About VillageMD

VillageMD, through its subsidiary Village Medical, is a leading, national provider of value-based primary care services. VillageMD partners with physicians to provide the tools, technology, operations, staffing support and industry relationships to deliver high-quality clinical care and better patient outcomes, while reducing the total cost of care. The Village Medical brand provides primary care for patients at traditional free-standing clinics, Village Medical at Walgreens clinics, at home and via virtual visits. VillageMD and Village Medical have grown to include more than 2,800 physicians across nine markets, are responsible for approximately 600,000 lives and manage $4 billion in total medical spend in value-based contracts. To learn

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medicine

Clackamas Volunteers in Medicine helps patients prioritize their own health care: Season of Sharing 2020

In the 21 years since Miriam Patino Sanchez came to Oregon, things haven’t always been easy.

The mother of four, who emigrated from Mexico at 26, is a full-time caregiver for her daughter with special needs and has faced health problems herself. It wasn’t always possible to address her own issues.

A few years ago at the urging of a friend, she applied to Clackamas Volunteers in Medicine, a free clinic in Oregon City.

For the first time in years, she found she was getting her health needs met without worrying about getting turned away or encountering a language barrier.

“I’ve found that no matter where you’re from, there’s no discrimination — that’s not a factor in receiving treatment,” Patino Sanchez told The Oregonian/OregonLive through an interpreter.

Clackamas Volunteers in Medicine is a beneficiary of The Oregonian/OregonLive’s 2020 Season of Sharing holiday fundraising campaign.

>>To donate: Season of Sharing GoFundMe page

In the five years that Patino Sanchez, 47, attended the clinic, she got treatment for her hyperthyroidism and fibromyalgia, and a free inhaler for her asthma.

The clinic also took its own measures to help Patino Sanchez, offering her services before she even asked for them. After she had hemorrhoid surgery, Patino Sanchez was still in a lot of pain. A doctor from the clinic determined that the surgery had not been done well, and called in a specialist to fix the problem.

“If I hadn’t had anyone to go to, I would have been suffering — I’d have been in a world of hurt for who knows how long,” she said.

Clackamas Volunteers in Medicine’s development director, Rebekah Singh, said many patients, like Patino Sanchez, are in a position where it’s difficult to prioritize their own health care.

“Most of our patients are $15-per-hour wage workers, who are sometimes holding multiple jobs,” Singh said. “Their employers hold them under 32 hours (a week) to avoid having to provide benefits.”

Many also have chronic health issues like hypertension or diabetes, which could be easily managed with proper care.

The Volunteers in Medicine organization has clinics nationwide, but the Clackamas branch, the first in Oregon, opened in 2011. It was started by local doctors with the goal of providing health care to those who couldn’t get it elsewhere.

The clinic is staffed by about 200 volunteers and five paid employees. Volunteers include doctors, some of whom are retired, as well as lab technicians, nurses and nurse practitioners. There are five paid administrative staff members. The clinic serves about 700 people a year, many of whom don’t have health insurance, or earn just above the rate to qualify for the Oregon Health Plan for low-income earners.

The organization operates on a budget of $400,000 annually, with 60% of its revenue coming from grant funding. About 40% comes from community funds, including donations and a yearly fundraiser.

Although Patino Sanchez received health insurance this year through Project Access NOW, which helps insure Oregonians, she has urged friends to seek out Clackamas Volunteers

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dentist

Aesthetic Dental Center of Morris County Has The Best Dentist For All Dental Care and Treatment Procedures

Aesthetic Dental Center of Morris County Has The Best Dentist For All Dental Care and Treatment Procedures

Dover, NJ – Aesthetic Dental Center of Morris County has a reputation that precedes it. The dental clinic is known for its 5-star dental care and treatment services. Members of the Dover, New Jersey community who have in the past had negative dental care and treatment experiences have found that the dental team at Aesthetic Dental Center of Morris County pays attention to the last detail while delivering a pain-free dental experience.

With hundreds of patients attended to, the team at Aesthetic Dental Center of Morris County remains committed to delivering a 5-star dental care experience that begins when the patient steps foot into the clinic.

The administrative staff is helpful, friendly, and professional in the discharge of their duties. New patients will find the team helpful throughout and after the registration process. The administrative staff will provide all of the help needed by the new patient during the registration process and with the paperwork. The team also offers information on financing plans, dental services offered, and more.

The dental clinic boasts of a relaxing and comfortable waiting area where patients can wait ahead of their dental appointment. Boasting a spacious dental office and consultation room, patients will enjoy the highest level of privacy as they discuss their dental problems with the attending dentist. The dentist at Aesthetic Dental Center of Morris County ensures that patients are provided the personalized service they need towards getting to the root of their dental problems.

By using the latest and most sophisticated dental equipment and tools, patients are guaranteed accurate diagnosis. The Dover Dentist understands the importance of accurate diagnosis as the first step to the proper treatment of dental problems. Patients will be educated on their dental condition and also offered all of the information they need to know regarding the available treatment options.

The dental team at Aesthetic Dental Center of Morris County offers a wide range of dental care and treatment solutions. Procedures offered at the clinic include general dentistry procedures like oral cancer screening, tooth decay services, regular dental cleanings, dental fillings, teeth whitening treatment, and more.

The dental team also offers comprehensive cosmetic dental solutions aimed at improving the quality of the patient’s smile. Some of the cosmetic dental procedures offered include dental implants for patients who have lost one or more teeth, teeth bleaching, porcelain veneers, as well as Invisalign aligners to correct orthodontic problems and for straighter teeth.

Patients in need of oral surgery intervention can also rely on the dental surgeons at Aesthetic Dental Center of Morris County to handle their needs. The team offers wisdom teeth extractions, tooth extractions, and extraction aftercare services.

Visit Aesthetic Dental Center of Morris County at 600 Mt. Pleasant Ave Suite E, Dover, NJ, 07801, or call (973) 361-6200. For more information, send an email to [email protected] or visit their website.

Media Contact
Company Name: Aesthetic Dental Center of Morris County
Contact Person: Vladmir Meskin DDS
Email: Send Email
Phone: (973) 361-6200
Address:600 Mt. Pleasant Ave Suite

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medicine

First Diversity Week at Stanford Medicine tackles tough topics in medical education, health care | News Center

People are a composite of many interconnected identities, Lassiter said, and taking an “intersectional” point of view is helpful in assessing how diverse, equitable and inclusive a workplace is. As an example, Lassiter described a case study of a particular organization that touted the number of women and people of color in their workforce. 

 The “statistics sound great on the surface, but … when we look at the data from an intersectional perspective, we see that the women in the organization are mostly white women, and the largest group of men in their organization is white men,” Lassiter said. 

 “When organizations say, ‘We’ve increased our numbers of women,’ who are those women?” Lassiter said. Similarly, when groups claim, “’We’ve increased our numbers of people of color,’ who’s included in [their definition of] people of color?” These are the questions that the framework of intersectionality helps us address, Lassiter said.

Diversity, equity and inclusion in medical education

We have to be willing to employ the same kind of rigor we apply to studies of science and medicine to efforts designed to eliminate bias and racism and promote diversity and inclusion, several speakers said.

In 2017, a 10-month program called Leadership, Education and Advancing Diversity, or LEAD, was created to pair Stanford Medicine residents and fellows with mentors who are Stanford Medicine faculty or educational administrators. 

“I had no idea how impactful this work would be,” Carmin Powell, MD, clinical assistant professor of pediatrics, told attendees at the Diversity and Inclusion Forum on Oct. 9. Powell co-directs LEAD with Lahia Yemane, MD. 

Every month, LEAD’s participants take part in discussion-based lectures on various topics related to equity, diversity and inclusion. They also work with their mentors to develop a presentation to deliver at the annual Diversity and Inclusion Forum.

 In just four years, LEAD has tripled in size, growing from 30 scholars and mentors to more than 100, Powell said. Part of the program’s success is its engagement with medical residents and fellows early in their careers, making equity, diversity and inclusion a part of their training.

Knowledge is key

Educating yourself on the history of racism and how to foster diversity and inclusion is essential, said Marc Nivet, executive vice president for institutional advancement at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and keynote speaker at this year’s Diversity and Inclusion Forum.

“If you get nothing else out of today’s talk, I would just implore you to read and to get educated,” Nivet said. 

“You can no longer be an effective leader, period — not just in academic medicine — but period, without being much more elevated in your ability to understand these issues,” he said. “And that comes from reading and learning.”

Learning, trying new things and sharing what does — and doesn’t— work is important for progress, Nivet explained. “I think we don’t share the results of failure, which is typical in academic medicine. We don’t get points for writing about failures or initiatives that didn’t work and why

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medicine

Treating Opioid Addiction in Primary Care Benefits Both Patients and Cash-Strapped Medical Practices

Press release content from PR Newswire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

ANN ARBOR, Mich., Nov. 11, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Buprenorphine-based treatment for opioid addiction is in short supply in many areas of the United States. And while many physicians want to offer it, clinics are unsure how to offer buprenorphine therapy in a financially sustainable way. Cost and revenue analysis from a team of Harvard Medical School researchers finds that even cash-strapped primary practices in high-poverty rural and urban communities can offer financially sustainable buprenorphine-based opioid addiction treatment.

The team, led by Sanjay Basu, MD, PhD, a Harvard primary care physician and epidemiologist and Jonathan E. Fried, MD, MPH, an internal medicine resident at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, interviewed practice managers and identified four common approaches to delivering buprenorphine-based treatment in primary care practices. The approaches differed based on who in the clinic delivered the majority of face-to-face care, the presence of nurse care managers, and whether care was delivered in traditional one-on-one or group settings.

The research team then used microsimulation modeling to identify the cost and financial benefit of delivering buprenorphine-based treatment in a variety of primary care settings, including Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC), non-FQHCs in both rural and urban high poverty areas,, and practices outside of high poverty areas. They found that all four approaches to care produced positive net revenue after the first year in a variety of practice settings, and net revenues were consistently highest for rural practices.

Physician-led treatment and shared medical visits, both of which relied on nurse care managers, consistently produced the greatest net revenue gains, generating from $29,000 to $70,000 per full-time physician per year across the practice types.

Additionally, net revenues were positive for all primary care practices that had at least nine patients in buprenorphine treatment per provider at any given time and no-show rates less than 34 percent. The findings suggest that in the current fee-for-service–dominated environment, offering office-based therapy for opioid addiction with buprenorphine can be a financially sustainable choice for cash-strapped primary care practices, despite hurdles.

Financing Buprenorphine Treatment in Primary Care: A Microsimulation Model

Jonathan E. Fried, et al

Center for Primary Care, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts

View original content to download multimedia: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/annals-of-family-medicine-treating-opioid-addiction-in-primary-care-benefits-both-patients-and-cash-strapped-medical-practices-301170615.html

SOURCE Annals of Family Medicine

Source Article

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