Cannabis

medicine

Cannabis has been recognised as medicine in a historic UN vote

A historic vote at the United Nations (UN) has recognised the medicinal value of cannabis and removed it from a list of dangerous drugs which are placed under the strictest controls.

The drug was previously listed on Schedule IV of the UN Commision on Narcotic Drugs’ list, which features other dangerous and tightly controlled substances, including heroin, fentanyl analogues and other opioids.

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The vote to downgrade the drug follows the World Health Organisation’s (WHO) recommendation last year to make it easier to conduct research into cannabis’s medicinal uses.

Still banned for non-medical use

The news of the downgrade does not necessarily pave the way for worldwide legalisation of the drug. Despite the UN now recognising the drug as a medicine, marijuana remains banned for non-medical use.

Cannabis will still remain on Schedule I of the convention, which means it will continue to require the highest levels of international control.

The vote will leave marijuana and cannabis resin on the list of Schedule I drugs, which also includes cocaine, fentanyl, OxyContin and morphine

The vote, which took place on Wednesday 2 November was close, with 27 of the Vienna based commission’s member states – including the US and European countries – in support of downgrading the drug.

Among the 25 countries who voted against the move were China, Russia, Pakistan, Nigeria and Egypt.

Anna Fordham, executive director of the International Drug Policy Consortium, said, “The original decision [in 1961] to prohibit cannabis lacked scientific basis and was rooted in colonial prejudice and racism.

“It disregarded the rights and traditions of communities that have been growing and using cannabis for medicinal, therapeutic, religious and cultural purposes for centuries, and has led to millions being criminalised and incarcerated across the globe.”

Growth of legalisation worldwide

Canada, Uruguay and 15 US states have legalised recreational cannabis use, and more than 50 countries around the world have adopted medicinal cannabis programmes.

Meanwhile many countries have decriminalised marijuana possession.

Cannabis remains illegal to possess, grow, distribute, sell or grow in the UK. Being caught with the drug comes with a maximum of five years in prison, an unlimited fine, or both.

Being convicted of producing and supplying the Class B drug can carry a penalty of up to 14 years behind bars, an unlimited fine, or both.

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medicine

Thanks To The UN, Cannabis Is Now Officially A ‘Medicine’ & People Are Like ‘Der Aaye Par Durust Aaye’

The entire hullabaloo around drugs and narcotics has put a fair section of Indian youth at an edge. Times have been pretty unpredictable for those who like to take the ‘high’ ground (pun intended) in the way they lead their lives. With the authorities taking a good sniff at the many “underground” drug cartels operating in the country, talk about drugs and narcotics even as means of laughter can be pretty risky



a man talking on a cell phone: © Pexels


© Provided by MensXP
© Pexels

But, you know us. None of that can stop us from reporting on real ‘developments’ that are happening out there. And the most recent news is that cannabis is now officially a medicine. We already know that cannabis has been used therapeutically for thousands of years, but it was today that a historic vote at the United Nations finally recognised the medicinal value of cannabis and removed it from a list of dangerous drugs which are placed under the strictest controls.



© Pexels


© Provided by MensXP
© Pexels

The vote was made after experts at the World Health Organisation recommended that the UN’s Commission for Narcotic Drugs remove cannabis from an international list of dangerous drugs which are discouraged from being used for medicinal purposes. But there’s still a catch. While it’s recognised as a medicine, the UN stated that it still remains banned for non-medical use.

Yet, this sure comes as a welcome news for those who have been rallying for such a reform for a while now. So let’s check out what people have to say about it.

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medicine

Cannabis Officially Becomes A ‘Medicine’ & It’s All Thanks To A Historic UN Vote

The entire hullabaloo around drugs and narcotics has put a fair section of Indian youth at an edge. Times have been pretty unpredictable for those who like to take the ‘high’ ground (pun intended) in the way they lead their lives. With the authorities taking a good sniff at the many “underground” drug cartels operating in the country, talk about drugs and narcotics even as means of laughter can be pretty risky

Thanks To The UN, Cannabis Is Now Officially A ‘Medicine’© Pexels

But, you know us. None of that can stop us from reporting on real ‘developments’ that are happening out there. And the most recent news is that cannabis is now officially a medicine. We already know that cannabis has been used therapeutically for thousands of years, but it was today that a historic vote at the United Nations finally recognised the medicinal value of cannabis and removed it from a list of dangerous drugs which are placed under the strictest controls.

Thanks To The UN, Cannabis Is Now Officially A ‘Medicine’© Pexels

The vote was made after experts at the World Health Organisation recommended that the UN’s Commission for Narcotic Drugs remove cannabis from an international list of dangerous drugs which are discouraged from being used for medicinal purposes. But there’s still a catch. While it’s recognised as a medicine, the UN stated that it still remains banned for non-medical use.

Yet, this sure comes as a welcome news for those who have been rallying for such a reform for a while now. So let’s check out what people have to say about it.

Read More
medicine

The Evolving Relationship Between Cannabis & Modern-Day Veterinary Medicine

In partnership with The Fresh Toast

In the U.S. and many other countries, dogs and cats alike are adored as loving family members. The ASPCA has estimated that in the U.S., 78 million dogs and 85.8 million cats are owned and treated as pets. Similarly, 44% of all American households have a dog as a pet, and 35% have a cat. Due to the abundance of pet dogs and cats, the demand for medical and veterinary services is significantly high, and it keeps growing.

For decades, pharmaceutical medications and traditional treatment methods tended to be the norm. However, in recent years, cannabidiol (CBD) has been making a large splash within the veterinary medicine industry. So, stick around to learn about the unique relationship between cannabis, but specifically CBD and modern-day veterinary medicine.

CBD Usage and Pet Mammals—What the Research Says

As more research findings are released about CBD’s medicinal properties that can be reaped by mammals including dogs and cats, the compound has become one alternative medicine that’s being discussed and/or considered much more now than ever before.

RELATED: How CBD Can Help Dogs With Osteoarthritis

To date, publications from Colorado State University (CSU) and Cornell University have documented the pharmacokinetics of CBD in dog subjects. The study reported that orally administered CBD (by mouth) is absorbed more effectively than transdermally administered CBD (applied on the skin’s surface). The study also found that orally administered CBD was well tolerated, which supports CBD’s solid safety profile.

Furthermore, a 2018 double-blind study was conducted by neurologist Stephanie McGrath from CSU to determine CBD’s ability to help treat seizures and epilepsy in dogs. It turns out that 89% of the dogs that received CBD experienced a reduction in seizure frequency. On a similar note, the cannabis-derived product called Epidiolex can be used by humans, but it can also be used in an extra label manner by veterinarians in accord with the Animal Medicinal Drug Use Clarification Act (AMDUCA).

RELATED: 5 Things to Know About Hemp-CBD In Pet Products

To learn more about the relationship between cannabinoids like CBD and animals, especially dogs, American Kennel Club (the nation’s largest and oldest purebred dog registry) awarded a $350,000 grant for a three-year crossover study to focus on CBD administration for epileptic dogs.

photo of man hugging tan dog
Photo by Eric Ward via Unsplash

How Do Veterinarians View CBD?

In a 2018 nationwide study published in the journal Frontiers in Veterinary Science, numerous veterinarians shared their views about CBD in their industry. When asked about which medical ailments they’d potentially treat with CBD products, the most common replies were for pain management, anxiety relief, and seizure relief. And when vets were asked about the potential benefits of CBD for treating various health issues, they reported witnessing (either first-hand or via pet owner reports) that CBD was the most helpful for treating chronic and acute pain, anxiety, and reducing seizure frequency/severity.

The Progressive Growth of the Veterinary CBD Market

Not only is the global veterinary CBD market projected to reach $125

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medicine

Voters Back More Drugs as Medicine… And Not Just Cannabis

Oregon voters passed a ballot measure Tuesday that would establish a legal psilocybin (“magic mushrooms”) administration program, while South Dakota and Mississippi became the latest states voting to legalize medical cannabis. Voters in several other states also approved initiatives to legalize recreational marijuana, and a measure in the District of Columbia passed that would decriminalize psilocybin and certain other psychedelic agents.

While the broad and immediate impact of these measures on the medical community remains largely unclear, some experts cited them in urging providers to expand their minds more.

Oregon became the first state to legalize psilocybin — or any psychedelic — for its citizens to consume. The state voted 55.8%-44.2%, as of Wednesday afternoon, to craft a program allowing it to be administered in some form of therapeutic setting to adults 21 and older, with details to be ironed out over the next 2 years. There will not be a dispensary system, however, like those in many states for medical cannabis.

Oregon has only decided to create a program, cautioned Matthew Johnson, PhD, associate director for the Center for Psychedelic and Consciousness Research at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. So it is too soon to know how people may get the psilocybin or how precisely medical professionals could be involved.

The program could include therapeutic use and treatment for some disorders, Johnson said. Assuming it unfolds as he expects, including coordination with federal authorities, Johnson predicts medical professionals will be needed during patient sessions to respond to potential emergencies and conduct follow-up care.

“The practice of medicine is something that needs to be regulated,” Johnson said. “The concern is if it’s not done right and could cause public harm. …It needs to be supervised.”

Psilocybin is under investigation, Johnson added, with one trial in phase III and other clinical trials underway, and some observational studies completed. But it is not an FDA-approved medicine.

As it happens, JAMA Psychiatry on Wednesday published a randomized trial, with Johnson among the authors, indicating that synthetic psilocybin was effective in major depression.

If Oregon’s program mirrors the results Johnson has seen in his own and other clinical research, “I think it does have a chance of helping patients, with an acceptable level of risk.”

The American Psychiatric Association and Oregon Medical Association both opposed the Oregon measure.

Johnson expects the state’s decision to lead other states to adopt similar measures. Efforts to decriminalize psychedelics — such as in D.C. — are still more popular then initiatives to legalize and foster use.

With South Dakota and Mississippi now on board, 36 states have now approved or implemented medical cannabis programs. Also this week, South Dakota, New Jersey, Arizona and Montana approved recreational marijuana — making South Dakota the first state ever to simultaneously approve medicinal and recreational cannabis. And a separate measure passed in Oregon that would decriminalize all currently illicit drugs including heroin, cocaine, and methamphetamine.)

Experts cautioned healthcare workers in South Dakota and Mississippi to be prepared for patients’ questions about cannabis,

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health

Asia Pacific cannabis market is expected to reach US$ 22,870.6 million by 2027 from US$ 2,318.6 million in 2019

The market is anticipated to grow with a CAGR of 28. 6% from 2020 to 2027. The growth of the Asia Pacific cannabis market is attributed to increasing research on medical cannabis and rising cannabis industry in Southeast Asia.

New York, Nov. 03, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Reportlinker.com announces the release of the report “Asia Pacific Cannabis Market Forecast to 2027 – COVID-19 Impact and Regional Analysis By Product Type ; Application ; Compound, and Country” – https://www.reportlinker.com/p05978820/?utm_source=GNW
However, restriction on the use of cannabis in the region is likely to hinder the market growth during the forecast period.

In recent years, the liberation for the use of cannabis in the medical industry has created various growth opportunities in Southeast Asian countries.Growing legal jurisdictions have enabled the progress of research activities in countries, such as South Korea, Australia, and New Zealand.

Also, various international companies have shown interest in effective market strategies.The companies have strategically enhanced their operational activities by partnering with local players.

For instance, a Canadian market player, Canopy Growth, has expanded its production in South Korea and Thailand.Similarly, MYM Nutraceuticals has expanded its business through its subsidiary MYM Australia.

Such expansions by the companies are expected to drive the cannabis market in the region.

Thailand is among the largest producers of cannabis.In late 2018, it became a cannabis production hub for legalized medical cannabis.

In addition, in December 2018, the military of Thailand voted to legalize medical cannabis use and in February 2019, Thailand legalized medical use of cannabis.Similarly, in January 2019, the Philippine House of Representatives approved the legalization of cannabis in the Philippines.

It has also created a Medical Cannabis Compassionate Center to initiate the creation of a legal cannabis industry.In March 2019, South Korea legalized medical use of cannabis.

Moreover, in March 2019, Japan approved the cannabis compound Epidiolex for clinical trials. Thus, such approvals for cannabis-based products are likely to drive market for cannabis in the Asia Pacific region.
On the other hand, the COVID-19 outbreak is growing in an unexpected way.For instance, according to an article published in May 2020, saying, “The study mentions how they have identified a minimum of 13 cannabis plants that are high in CBD that can affect the ACE2 pathways that the coronavirus uses to get inside one’s body”.

Therefore, it is expected to increase the use of medical cannabis to treat symptoms of COVID-19.

Based on product type, the Asia Pacific cannabis market is segmented into flower, concentrates, and others.In 2019, the flower segment held the largest market share of the cannabis market.

However, the concentrates segment is expected to witness the highest CAGR in the next few years.
In terms of application, the Asia Pacific cannabis market is segmented into medical and recreational.In 2019, the medical segment held larger share of the market.

However, the recreational segment is anticipated to witness fastest growth during the forecast period.

Based on compound, the Asia Pacific cannabis market is segmented into tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)-dominant, cannabidiol (CBD)-dominant, and balanced THC

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health

CHNC Aims to be the Global Leader in Cannabis Clinical Trials Through a Merger with Pharmacology University

HOUSTON, Texas, Oct. 28, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — via NewMediaWire — CHNC announces its merger with Pharmacology University, Inc., a global leader in the field of medical cannabis education that markets its services under the brand Pharmacology University. More to the point, CHNC joining forces with Pharmacology University Inc. and Precision Research Institute has created one of the most complete companies in the cannabis industry. COO Elizabeth Hernandez explains the reasons behind the decision: “While pursuing my dream, I had wanted to unite forces with a company in the Cannabis Industry and that is when I found Pharmacology University. The synergy between the two companies has been superb and we are positioning ourselves to become the high-end authority of the Cannabis Research Industry. Now this journey finally feels complete. Riding this new wave of inspiration, we are deeply committed to produce revenue generating models and building shareholder value.”

The merger of CHNC, which is publicly traded on OTC markets under the ticker symbol CHNC, provides the framework for Pharmacology University to expand its focus into cannabis clinical trials and bolstering its education offerings.

Founded in 2010, Pharmacology University offers educational products and consulting services in the United States, Puerto Rico, Latin and South America; to train doctors, dispensary owners, growers, lawyers, and other professionals on the palliative and myriad health benefits of cannabis. The company also has partnered with private accredited universities to offer an intensive master’s certification program in cannabis science and is now the top international provider of medical cannabis education.

In addition to its classroom education, Pharmacology University owns and operates Canna Law Magazine, which is a digital informational piece that provides cultural enrichment to the cannabis entrepreneur. The magazine has biweekly editions and informs the public about the most recent legal cases in the cannabis industry worldwide, also providing strategies by which its readers can avoid finding themselves in legal situations for lack of knowledge. Canna Law Magazine is currently available in English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian and Arabic, and it is being developed to be published in Chinese and Hindi. To view the magazine, visit www.cannalawmagazine.com.

“We want to be pioneers in the search for the truth with actual clinical trials, in regards to how cannabis can be utilized,” says Pharmacology University In-House Legal Counsel, Anne Graham. “Predominantly because the number one problem for people that are set against using cannabis as medicine is simply due to the fact that the cannabis industry has not produced sufficient medical studies,” she says.

The global market for medical cannabis (also known as medical marijuana), is expected to reach more than $150 billion annually by 2027, according to a 2019 report by ResearchAndMarkets.com. The anticipated growth is driven in large part by the legalization of cannabis for medical use in Europe, as well as the passage in the U.S. of the Hemp Farming Act of 2018, which legalized hemp, a variety of the Cannabis Sativa species that has less than 0.3% concentration of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). And

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Cannabis Reduces OCD Symptoms Around 50%, Research Suggests

KEY POINTS

  • After smoking cannabis, users with OCD reduced their compulsions by 60% and reduced their anxiety by 52%
  • OCD is a condition characterized by persistent thoughts and repetitive behavior
  • The study was recently published in the Journal of Affective Disorders

A Washington State University study revealed people with obsessive-compulsive disorder experienced  a reduction in symptom severity within hours of smoking cannabis.

The researchers analyzed data from people who self-identified as having OCD, a condition characterized by persistent thoughts and repetitive behavior. After smoking cannabis, users with OCD experienced a 60% reduction in compulsions and a 52% reduction in anxiety.

According to the Anxiety and Depression Association Of America, OCD affects 1% of the U.S. population. It is equally common among genders and about one-third of affected adults first experienced symptoms during childhood.

The study, recently published in the Journal of Affective Disorders, found higher doses and cannabis with greater concentrations of CBD were associated with bigger reductions in compulsions.

“The results overall indicate that cannabis may have some beneficial short-term but not really long-term effects on obsessive-compulsive disorder,” said Carrie Cuttler, the study’s corresponding author.

“To me, the CBD findings are really promising because it is not intoxicating. This is an area of research that would really benefit from clinical trials looking at changes in compulsions, intrusions and anxiety with pure CBD.”

The WSU study drew from data of more than 1,800 cannabis sessions that 87 individuals logged in 31 months. As people continued the study, users developed a small tolerance to cannabis, but reductions in compulsions and anxiety remained fairly consistent.

Traditional treatments for OCD include exposure and response prevention therapy where people’s irrational thoughts around their behaviors are directly challenged. Other mainstream treatments include antidepressants.

 While these treatments have positive effects for many patients, they do not cure OCD nor do they work well for every person.

“We’re trying to build knowledge about the relationship of cannabis use and OCD because it’s an area that is really understudied,” said Dakota Mauzay, a doctoral student in Cuttler’s lab and co-author of the paper.

Researchers are just beginning to understand uses for cannabis. Harvard Medical School reported cannabis is commonly used for pain control in the United States. While marijuana isn’t strong enough for severe pain, it is quite effective for chronic and lingering pain, especially for aging individuals. Marijuana is a muscle relaxant, and users say it has the ability to lessen tremors in Parkinson’s disease.

In states where medical marijuana has been approved for use, it is authorized for dozens of ailments, including agitation in Alzheimer’s disease, Crohn’s disease and glaucoma.

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