Biggest

fitness

Dubai brings together world football’s biggest stars for friendly match as part of Dubai Fitness Challenge

(MENAFN – Emirates News Agency (WAM)) DUBAI, 21st November, 2020 (WAM) — Some of international football’s biggest stars came together in Dubai this weekend for a friendly match that took place on the pitches at Dubai Sports World, inside the air-conditioned halls of Dubai World Trade Centre as part of Dubai Fitness Challenge 30 x 30.

The match was organised jointly by Dubai Sports Council and Dubai’s Department of Tourism and Commerce Marketing.

The players who took part in the match have won every possible title in the world of football, including the FIFA World Cup, UEFA European Championships, UEFA Champions League as well the Best Player of the Year awards.

The star-studded line-up included Portugal legend Luis Figo, the 2000 Ballon d’Or and 2001 FIFA World Player of the Year winner, who is considered one of the greatest to ever play the game; Carles Puyol, the former Spain captain and winner of the 2010 World Cup and the 2008 European Championships, and Dutch Clarence Seedorf, who is the only player to have won the UEFA Champions League with three different clubs – once with Ajax (1995), once with Real Madrid (1998) and twice with Milan (2003 and 2007).

Seedorf’s Dutch compatriot, Patrick Kluivert who holds the record for being the youngest player to score in the final of the main event on the European continent also took part in the match. He was only 18 years, 10 months and 23 days when he came off the bench to score Ajax’s 85th-minute winner against AC Milan in the 1995 Champions League final.

Frenchman Eric Abidal, the winner of two Champions League titles with Barcelona, also took the pitch alongside the likes of former Spain and Real Madrid star Michel Salgado, Italian goalkeeping legend Walter Zenga, Ghana’s Sulley Muntari and Frenchman Ibrahim Ba.

Mikael Silvestre, former France, Manchester United and Arsenal defender, was also present, cheering his former teammates and rivals from the sidelines as an injury prevented him from playing.

Saeed Hareb, Secretary-General of Dubai Sports Council, and Nasser Aman Al Rahma, Assistant Secretary-General of the Council, were present at the game along with Omran Al Jasmi, Manager of External Relations at the Council.

The stars thanked Dubai for providing them with this opportunity to come together and meets friends they had not met for a long time. The players who took part in the match all share a common love for Dubai and are either residents here or regular visitors. A number of them own properties and have plans to invest in Dubai’s growing sports sector.

MENAFN21112020000061011009ID1101163116


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fitness

This is the ‘biggest mistake’ business owners make

According to Alberto Perlman, co-founder and CEO of Zumba Fitness, the “biggest mistake” entrepreneurs make is thinking they “know more than their customer,” he tells CNBC Make It.



a man holding a racket: Alberto Perlman, co-founder and CEO of Zumba Fitness speaking at Iconic L.A. on Sept. 27th, 2017.


© Provided by CNBC
Alberto Perlman, co-founder and CEO of Zumba Fitness speaking at Iconic L.A. on Sept. 27th, 2017.

Perlman has spent nearly two decades building Zumba’s global brand (in 2012, The New York Times reported Zumba was valued at $500 million after Insight Venture Partners and the Raine Group invested in the company). And throughout, he has listened to and used customer feedback as a tool to further its success.

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“You have to always be listening, and listening between the lines, to your customer,” Perlman says.

When customers share what they’re “frustrated with, struggling with, and what they love” about a business, owners should use the feedback to their advantage, he says.

“You can start connecting dots, and that’s how you create and solve their problem,” because to be successful in business, entrepreneurs must be good at problem solving, Perlman says. “It’s about falling in love with the problem that you’re trying to solve, finding a solution for it and being passionate about it.”

Perlman himself is “constantly” learning from and listening to customer feedback, he says, which has helped Zumba over the years.

For example, Zumba, originally a dance workout, launched Strong Nation, a high intensity interval training (HIIT) program, in 2016 after customers expressed interest in the HIIT trend.

“We saw that a lot of people wanted to do HIIT training,” Perlman said. As a result, “Strong Nation [has] been growing like a weed.”

Listening to customers also helped Zumba thrive amid the Covid-19 pandemic.

The fitness industry was one of the hardest hit due to the coronavirus’ spread. Fitness clubs forced to close faced $10 billion in revenue lost as customers cancelled their memberships and at least 500,000 employees were furloughed, according to a survey by investment bank Harrison Co. conducted in April.

Like gyms and other exercise brands, Zumba pivoted once stay-at-home orders were mandated. While Zumba is typically licensed and used by gyms for in-person, group classes, Perlman and his team launched an online platform for customers to take virtual Zumba classes with trainers.

Almost every week since its launch, “we keep updating it [with] new features” based on customer and trainer feedback, Perlman says, which is “driving more people to the instructor’s classes.” As a result, “instructors generate more income, reach more people and have more students,” despite the pandemic woes. Perlman declined to give any revenue numbers.

Perlman is not alone in extoling the importance of what customers have to say – Jeff Bezos, founder and CEO of Amazon has built his company around it.

In 1994, Bezos started Amazon as an online bookstore, but shifted to become “the everything store” after he emailed 1,000 random customers asking for feedback.

“Much of what we build at Amazon Web Services is based on listening to customers,” Bezos wrote in his 2018 letter

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fitness

Zumba Fitness CEO on the ‘biggest mistake’ business owners make

According to Alberto Perlman, co-founder and CEO of Zumba Fitness, the “biggest mistake” entrepreneurs make is thinking they “know more than their customer,” he tells CNBC Make It.

Perlman has spent nearly two decades building Zumba’s global brand (in 2012, The New York Times reported Zumba was valued at $500 million after Insight Venture Partners and the Raine Group invested in the company). And throughout, he has listened to and used customer feedback as a tool to further its success.

“You have to always be listening, and listening between the lines, to your customer,” Perlman says.

When customers share what they’re “frustrated with, struggling with, and what they love” about a business, owners should use the feedback to their advantage, he says.

“You can start connecting dots, and that’s how you create and solve their problem,” because to be successful in business, entrepreneurs must be good at problem solving, Perlman says. “It’s about falling in love with the problem that you’re trying to solve, finding a solution for it and being passionate about it.”

Perlman himself is “constantly” learning from and listening to customer feedback, he says, which has helped Zumba over the years.

For example, Zumba, originally a dance workout, launched Strong Nation, a high intensity interval training (HIIT) program, in 2016 after customers expressed interest in the HIIT trend.

“We saw that a lot of people wanted to do HIIT training,” Perlman said. As a result, “Strong Nation [has] been growing like a weed.”

Listening to customers also helped Zumba thrive amid the Covid-19 pandemic.

The fitness industry was one of the hardest hit due to the coronavirus’ spread. Fitness clubs forced to close faced $10 billion in revenue lost as customers cancelled their memberships and at least 500,000 employees were furloughed, according to a survey by investment bank Harrison Co. conducted in April.

Like gyms and other exercise brands, Zumba pivoted once stay-at-home orders were mandated. While Zumba is typically licensed and used by gyms for in-person, group classes, Perlman and his team launched an online platform for customers to take virtual Zumba classes with trainers.

Almost every week since its launch, “we keep updating it [with] new features” based on customer and trainer feedback, Perlman says, which is “driving more people to the instructor’s classes.” As a result, “instructors generate more income, reach more people and have more students,” despite the pandemic woes. Perlman declined to give any revenue numbers.

Perlman is not alone in extoling the importance of what customers have to say – Jeff Bezos, founder and CEO of Amazon has built his company around it.

In 1994, Bezos started Amazon as an online bookstore, but shifted to become “the everything store” after he emailed 1,000 random customers asking for feedback.

“Much of what we build at Amazon Web Services is based on listening to customers,” Bezos wrote in his 2018 letter to shareholders. “It’s critical to ask customers what they want, listen carefully to their answers, and figure out a plan to provide

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health

Business Insider’s biggest healthcare stories for November 2.

Welcome to Business Insiders daily healthcare newsletter, your daily dose of pharma, biotech, and healthcare news. Subscribe here to get this newsletter in your inbox every weekday.

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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider


Hello,

Happy election day eve. I’m Megan, the healthcare team’s startups and venture capital reporter. I’m filling in for Lydia, who’s still on her cross-country move to Colorado. I’m covering a lot these days, but I’m been particularly interested in digital health startups that employ gig workers.

Know any that fit the bill? Shoot me a note: [email protected]

First: Dr. Anthony Fauci warned in an interview with The Washington Post that the US needs to make an “abrupt change” to halt a surge in coronavirus cases. And President Donald Trump told supporters that he might fire Fauci after the election.

Here’s the rest of today’s healthcare news: Rock Health identified 17 startups that are ripe for an IPO, the founder of shuttered senior care startup Call9 is back with a familiar venture, and healthcare executives are favoring Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden when it comes to their personal campaign donations. 


Alto Pharmacy CEO Matt Gamache-Asselin and chief technology officer Jamie Karraker

Alto Pharmacy CEO Matt Gamache-Asselin and chief technology officer Jamie Karraker

Alto Pharmacy


Digital health companies are racing to go public. Here are the 17 startups that are ripe for a Wall Street debut.

  • Analysts from Rock Health, a healthcare venture and advisory firm, told Blake Dodge that the flurry of digital health initial public offerings in 2019 and 2020 was no fluke, according to a July report. 
  • At least nine such companies have gone public in the last 17 months, including Livongo, Health Catalyst, Change Healthcare, Peloton, and Hims. 
  • The firm is keeping a running list of companies that are ripe for an IPO, given their funds compared to the average amount for a digital health startup pre-IPO, which is $187 million.
  • They’re not predictions per se, but a spokesperson for the company said that if companies do end up going public, they will likely be on this list of 17 best-funded startups.

Read the full story from Blake here>>


timothy peck rob macnaughton curve health

Curve Health founder Dr. Timothy Peck (left) and CEO Rob MacNaughton.

Curve Health


We got an exclusive look at the 16-slide presentation the founder of a failed telehealth startup that convinced investors to give him another shot at digital health

Read my full story here>>


biden trump regular



Getty/Getty


We combed through records of 100 healthcare companies to see who their top executives are donating to in the 2020 election. They reveal a surprising trend.

Read the full story from Kimberly Leonard here>>


More stories we’re reading:


Lydia will be back at the newsletter helm tomorrow. In the meantime, please send any and all startups-related tips to [email protected]

– Megan

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medicine

As STAT turns 5, a look back at science and medicine’s biggest headlines

The past five years have been packed with medical and scientific advances, a series of public health crises that have gripped the world, and uproar over rising prescription drug costs.

They’ve also been a heck of a time to launch a publication about health and medicine.

As STAT celebrates its five-year anniversary, our reporters took a look back at six areas we’ve covered closely — CRISPR, infectious disease, the opioid crisis, drug pricing, AI in medicine, and cell and gene therapy — to recap the biggest headlines and controversies and cast an eye to what may lie ahead.

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Breaker for 5 year

CRISPR: A Nobel, He Jiankui’s bombshell, and an ugly patent fight

Even before STAT published its first stories, we knew CRISPR would be big: Breakthrough scientific papers in 2012 and early 2013 showed that this technique for changing the DNA of plants and animals was so easy to use that labs across the world would seize on it to understand basic biological processes as well as develop cures for genetic diseases. That’s why my first story for STAT profiled one of CRISPR’s inventors, biologist Feng Zhang of the Broad Institute. Check out his “Twinkle, twinkle, little star” analogy.

Sure enough, just five years later, CRISPR became Nobel big: Earlier this month, biochemist Jennifer Doudna of the University of California, Berkeley, and microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier of the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology won the Nobel Prize in chemistry for their discovery of the CRISPR-Cas9 genetic scissors. The award was the first science Nobel won by two women.

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What I never suspected was how fast a CRISPR nightmare might come true, how agonizingly long drug development takes, and what an ugly fight over patents CRISPR would spawn.

CRISPR’s inventors knew from the get-go that it would be theoretically possible to use the technique to alter the genes of human embryos, creating “designer babies.” That seemed like something a rogue researcher might try in, oh, 10 years. Yet there I was in Hong Kong in November 2018, at the second international conference on human genome editing, when China’s He Jiankui dropped his bombshell: He’d CRISPR’d human embryos, resulting in the birth of twin, genetically altered girls. That ignited a firestorm of condemnation and hand-wringing that the global scientific community hadn’t tried hard enough to stop him.

Also in the hand-wringing category: The fight over CRISPR patents between the Broad Institute and the University of California has been an eye-opener with its legal costs (well into eight figures; think of the science that would buy), ugly accusations, and sheer persistence.

Two happier CRISPR surprises: significant improvements on the original technique and the growing list of human diseases it might treat or cure, if success in lab mice is any indication.

With several companies as well as academic scientists already using CRISPR in clinical trials, one message from 2015 has stuck: CRISPR might actually live up to its hype, becoming the powerhouse genetic cure scientists dreamed of.

— Sharon Begley

Breaker for 5 year

Infectious disease: From

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health

To Find a Coronavirus Vaccine, GlaxoSmithKline Is Bonding With Its Biggest Competitors

The Covid-19 pandemic is turning some fierce drug-industry foes into the best of frenemies.

The pharmaceutical giant standing at the center of this team of rivals is

GlaxoSmithKline


GSK 0.57%

PLC, the world’s largest vaccine maker by sales. The British company is jointly developing a Covid-19 antibody drug with a San Francisco upstart, offering rivals a proprietary ingredient that is designed to boost a vaccine’s power and planning to share research study results.

“We felt this very unusual situation required something that GSK hadn’t done before, and something we hadn’t seen in the industry before either,” says Roger Connor, president of Glaxo’s vaccines business.

What makes Glaxo’s collaboration so unusual is that competition typically defines the relationship among drugmakers. Company researchers race to be first to bring a new kind of therapy to market or work on treatments that can outdo older medicines, while marketers roll out campaigns designed to boost sales at the expense of rivals.

In the age of Covid-19, old adversaries are uniting around a common enemy: the new coronavirus. Their nascent partnership is now visible in everything from trials to research to manufacturing. Glaxo and eight other pharmaceutical firms even took the rare step of issuing a joint pledge last month to seek regulatory approvals for their vaccines only after proving their safety and effectiveness in large, final-stage clinical trials.

How far along each of the vaccines are

Testing stages typically move from ‘preclinical,’ before the vaccine is deemed appropriate to test in people, to the three phases of human clinical trials.

So far, 44 candidates have made it to clinical trials.

Type of vaccine

Viral vector

Ten of these have advanced into phase 3, which tests whether the dose that would be given to the public works safely.

The most common area of cooperation thus far is manufacturing. Some longtime rivals are striking deals to stretch their capacity to meet anticipated demand. Roche Holding AG is helping manufacture an antiviral drug in development by rival Regeneron.

Amgen Inc.

will help make

Eli Lilly

& Co.’s antiviral drugs if the treatments are authorized by regulators.

Pfizer

has dedicated manufacturing capacity to turning out doses of remdesivir, an antiviral made by rival

Gilead Sciences Inc.

The camaraderie also extends to the traditionally cutthroat realm of research.

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc.

scientists contributed to research on a vaccine in development by

BioNTech SE

and Pfizer Inc., and were co-authors on a paper this summer detailing the results. In another rare move,

Merck

& Co.’s research and development chief called his Glaxo counterpartment in April to pass along a tip that one of Glaxo’s molecules showed promise in Merck’s Covid-19 lab tests.

Glaxo’s most prominent contribution to this new era of collaboration is its decision to share a proprietary vaccine component known as an adjuvant—an ingredient that helps boost a vaccine’s protective power by rousing the body’s immune response. Glaxo now has agreements to supply that ingredient to four vaccine developers, including French drugmaker

Sanofi SA,

and stands ready to

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health

Pfizer Sets Up Its ‘Biggest Ever’ Vaccination Distribution Campaign

In Kalamazoo, Mich., a stretch of land the size of a football field has been turned into a staging ground outfitted with 350 large freezers, ready to take delivery of millions of doses of Covid-19 vaccine before they can be shipped around the world.

The facility is a hub in the sprawling supply chain

Pfizer Inc.

has built to handle the delivery of a vaccine widely awaited as a possible relief from the coronavirus pandemic. The U.S. pharmaceutical giant says it wants to deliver up to 100 million doses this year and another 1.3 billion in 2021.

Like other drugmakers testing potential vaccines, Pfizer is urgently laying the groundwork with its logistics partners so it can move quickly if its vaccine gets the go-ahead from the Food and Drug Administration and other regulators around the world.

“It’s the biggest-ever vaccination campaign,” said Tanya Alcorn, Pfizer’s supply-chain vice president. “If we get the FDA approval, we will be able to ship the vaccines very shortly after.”

The New York-based drugmaker is working with Germany’s

BioNTech SE

on one of several experimental Covid-19 vaccines in late-stage testing. Pfizer says it may know whether its vaccine works by the end of October and that it could be ready to apply for emergency-use authorization of its Covid-19 vaccine by late November.

The company’s effort to deliver relief to pandemic-weary populations will revolve around refrigerated storage sites at two of the company’s final assembly centers—the Kalamazoo facility and another in Puurs, Belgium—and rely on dozens of cargo-jet flights and hundreds of truck trips every day. Distribution centers in Pleasant Prairie, Wis., and in Karlsruhe, Germany, have been outfitted for extra storage capacity.

Pfizer so far has spent about $2 billion on developing the vaccine and setting up the distribution network.

The U.S. government placed an initial order for 100 million doses, with the option to purchase 500 million additional doses. The EU ordered 200 million doses with an option for another 100 million. Japan ordered 120 million doses and the U.K. 30 million. Countries in South America and in the Asia-Pacific region also have placed significant orders.

In a typical vaccination campaign, pharmaceutical companies would wait until their product is approved before buying raw materials, establishing manufacturing lines and setting up supply chains to ship a vaccine.

Pfizer Chief Executive Albert Bourla said that the company began setting the groundwork for its supply chain in March, when it kicked off its vaccine development.

“Ensuring over a billion people globally have access to our potential vaccine is as critical as developing the vaccine itself,” he said.

Pfizer says it is preparing for distribution in case the vaccine wins authorization, with hundreds of thousands of doses already in the company’s warehouses in the U.S. and Europe.

Cool Box

To make sure its Covid-19 vaccine doses arrive at hospitals and clinics frozen and potent, Pfizer created

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health

Idaho seeing its biggest case spike of pandemic

BOISE, Idaho — Idaho is seeing its largest coronavirus spike since the pandemic began, with the number of new cases increasing 46.5% over the past two weeks.

That has some health care experts urging Gov. Brad Little to take additional action to slow the spread of the virus.

Dr. Bart Hill with the St. Luke’s Regional Health System says Idaho’s current approach hasn’t worked to change the trajectory of the pandemic. He says hospital officials are meeting with the governor to encourage additional steps like statewide information campaigns targeting teens and young adults.

The governor has said the responsibility for efforts to slow the virus falls on individuals. He urges people to wear masks, practice social distancing and wash their hands.

___


HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— AP-NORC poll: Two-thirds of Americans don’t trust Trump much on virus

— CDC: ‘Strong recommendation’ for masks on planes, trains, buses

— Arizona reports more than 1,000 coronavirus cases

— Federal judge considers challenge to CDC order halting evictions of certain renters through the end of year to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

— British PM Johnson imposing strict coronavirus restrictions on Greater Manchester, England’s second-largest urban area, after talks fail on financial support.

— World Series opens Tuesday night with Major League Baseball relieved to reach the championship of a pandemic-delayed season.

___

Follow all of AP’s coronavirus pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

___

HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

DENVER — Colorado’s governor says he won’t impose new statewide restrictions for addressing what he calls an alarming acceleration of new coronavirus cases and hospitalizations.

Gov. Jared Polis said Tuesday that he will instead encourage the people of Colorado to take responsibility for mask wearing, social distancing, getting tested, self-quarantining and other behaviors to stem the virus’s spread.

Polis says roughly 80% of the pandemic fight comes down to personal decisions. He also says local health agencies are best suited to deal with any rising cases among their residents.

The state reported 1,208 new confirmed cases Tuesday and 417 hospitalizations.

___

SEATTLE — Washington state Gov. Jay Inslee is requiring colleges and universities to provide quarantine facilities for all students if they are exposed to the coronavirus.

The governor on Tuesday issued more restrictions for higher education campuses as the University of Washington struggles to contain an outbreak in its fraternities and sororities. There also have been outbreaks in Whitman County, home of Washington State University.

The new guidelines require colleges to provide isolation and quarantine facilities for Greek system houses, communal off-campus homes, students living in dorms and other personnel if they don’t have a place to go. Colleges without dorms or residential facilities will have to devise plans for addressing student and staff needs for isolation and quarantine in the event of exposure.

___

ANN ARBOR, Mich. — Students at the University of Michigan are being ordered to stay in place for two weeks after a surge of coronavirus cases driven by social

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health

Gottlieb says “biggest wave” of coronavirus infections still to come

Washington — Dr. Scott Gottlieb, former commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, warned Sunday that the current wave of new coronavirus infections is likely to be the “biggest wave” the nation experiences before a vaccine.



a man wearing a suit and tie: screen-shot-2020-10-18-at-11-14-24-am.png


© CBS News
screen-shot-2020-10-18-at-11-14-24-am.png

“We’re going to have to endure this wave of spread right now,” Gottlieb said Sunday on “Face the Nation.” “And it’s probably likely to be the biggest wave that we endure without the benefit of a vaccinated population.”

There have been more than 8.1 million confirmed cases of the coronavirus in the United States, and the death toll is approaching 220,000, according to Johns Hopkins University. Hospitalizations are rising in 42 states, and 45 states have expanding epidemics, Gottlieb said.

“There’s really no backstop against the spread that we’re seeing,” he said, adding that this is the “most difficult phase of this epidemic.”

Gottlieb said the current uptick in coronavirus infections is occurring as states have left measures in place to mitigate the spread of the virus, including requiring masks in public and indoors, encouraging social distancing and limiting the number of people in restaurants and bars.

Gottlieb says “biggest wave” of coronavirus infections still to come

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UP NEXT

“If we weren’t taking those steps, if people weren’t wearing masks generally and some states weren’t adhering to some mitigation tactics and we weren’t testing and tracing, then we’d have much worse spread,” he said.

The latest surge in coronavirus cases comes as millions prepare to go to the polls for early voting or to cast their ballots on November 3, though election officials are encouraging voters to vote by mail or develop a plan to ensure they can cast their votes safely.

Gottlieb said precautions are being taken at polling places and warned the “biggest risks” are settings where people are more comfortable and may let their guards down.

“When you talk to the governors about where the spread is occurring, it’s occurring in congregate settings where people feel more comfortable, a local Elks Club, a large family gathering,” he said. 

While coronavirus infections are rising, President Trump has returned to the campaign trail, holding large rallies with thousands in attendance, many of whom have not worn masks. Mr. Trump himself was diagnosed with the coronavirus this month and spent three days being treated for COVID-19 at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.

Gottlieb said the actions from the Trump campaign are “problematic” and questioned what the strategy from the White House is to combat the spread of the coronavirus. 

“They’ve come out against universal masking. They’ve come out against testing asymptomatic and mildly symptomatic people. They say testing should be reserved just to the vulnerable. They want businesses and schools reopened, as we all do, and they’re against targeted mitigation like closing restaurants,” Gottlieb said of the White House. “There was criticism of New York when New York kept the restaurants closed. So it begs the question, what is the strategy? And I think the

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fitness

Biggest Deals On Fitness And Exercise Equipment

With COVID-19 still running rampant across the globe, safe means of exercising has become the norm for most people. This means working out has shifted from public spaces such as gyms or yoga studios to the comfort of people’s homes. If you are planning to start your own home gym, you need to look no further than Prime Day. This mega shopping festival gives you the opportunity to buy some great fitness equipment for your home at some great discounts, so you can start building your home gym right away.

Here are 10 great fitness equipment you can get for your home gym at throwaway prices on Amazon’s Prime Day sale. Whether you want to increase your strength, practice yoga or improve your cardio capacity, we have the right things you can buy during Prime Day here.

1. VIGBODY Stationary Bike for Home Cardio

(photo from amazon.com)

VIGBODY Stationary Bike for Home Cardio has a robust heavy steel frame and a triangular structure that supports up to 330 pounds in body weight. It works with a leather transmission belt instead of a chain that results in a quiet workout. You can enjoy an outdoor riding experience even at home. Its 4-way adjustable seat and 2-way adjustable handlebar offer a comfortable experience while exercising. The adjustable nature of this bike makes it perfect for all members of your family.

2. LEEKEY Resistance Band Set

(photo from amazon.com)

LEEKEY Resistance Band Set comes with four bands that are made of natural latex material, which has strong wear resistance and can withstand extreme tensile force. You can train with no worries of wear and tear with these excellent bands. They offer excellent resistance while doing pull-ups. The bands also work for anyone who needs to stretch out sore muscles after a workout and stiff ones for before. They are a perfect addition to your home gym and easy to carry in your duffle bag when you go to a fitness center for a workout, too.

3. BEAUTYOVO Puzzle Exercise Mat

(photo from amazon.com)

BEAUTYOVO Puzzle Exercise Mat is made up of all-black foam floor mats that interlock together. Once assembled, they cover about 96 square feet. You can also safely use them as an indoor playground for kids. The mats are made of flexible and impact resistant Eva foam that has thick padding to provide excellent cushioning for your body or equipment. The thick mats safeguard your floor from scratches, scuffs and dents. 

4. Tone Fitness Aerobic Step 

(photo from amazon.com)

Tone Fitness Aerobic Step is light-weight and easy to carry, weighing in at just 5. 5 pounds. The step offers a secure, non-slip surface for your workout routine and is adjustable for two height levels of 4-inches or 6-inches. It includes a workout chart to provide additional instructions and exercises for you. The step can be used by people of all levels to help build endurance, strength and improve overall fitness. It comes in two colors: neon yellow and black.

5. ProsourceFit

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