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What Barack Obama’s memoir reveals about his long battle for healthcare reform

President Barack Obama speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, Friday, June 26, 2015, after the Supreme Court declared that same-sex couples have the right to marry anywhere in the US.
An excerpt of former President Barack Obama’s upcoming memoir “A Promised Land” was released Monday by the New Yorker. (Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP)

The political battle for universal healthcare within the White House was long, epic and personal.

“Each time I met a parent struggling to come up with the money to get treatment for a sick child, I thought back to the night Michelle and I had to take three-month-old Sasha to the emergency room for what turned out to be viral meningitis,” former President Barack Obama recalled in an excerpt from “A Promised Land,” the forthcoming first volume of his memoirs of his time in the White House. The excerpt was published Monday in the New Yorker.

“I remembered the terror and the helplessness we felt as the nurses whisked her away for a spinal tap, and the realization that we might never have caught the infection in time had the girls not had a regular pediatrician we felt comfortable calling in the middle of the night,” he continued. “Most of all, I thought about my mom, who had died in 1995, of uterine cancer.”

The chapter — which offers an inside look into the passage of Obamacare at the end of the former president’s first year in office — comes at a crucial moment for his signature piece of legislation, as its future could be threatened by the expected confirmation on Monday of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court.

“In the middle of a pandemic, this administration is trying to dismantle the Affordable Care Act in the Supreme Court,” Obama said on Twitter Monday while presenting the excerpt. “Here’s how Joe and I fought to expand healthcare, protect millions of Americans with preexisting conditions, and actually get it done.”

The journey toward passage was messy and prone to second-guessing, particularly from Obama’s closest allies: David Axelrod, his advisor, and Rahm Emanuel his chief of staff, who warned him of the political hazards: “[This] can blow up in our faces.”

Emanuel warned Obama that the process of getting the bill passed would lead to unpleasant compromises and a potentially huge backlash. “Making sausage isn’t pretty, Mr. President,” he told his boss. “And you’re asking for a really big piece of sausage.”

In another passage, Obama writes about the rise of the Tea Party movement, which became harder for him to ignore, especially when it resurrected an old rumor from Obama’s campaign days: that he was Muslim and born in Kenya, which would have barred him from serving as president. This lie would eventually be used by Donald Trump to consolidate the base that would help make him Obama’s successor.

“At the White House,

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Barack Obama says Trump trying to dismantle ACA through Supreme Court

In his new memoir, Obama says his push for the Affordable Care Act was personal

President Obama wants Americans to understand the history of the Affordable Care Act. In a long-form piece for The New Yorker, Obama details the history of healthcare in the country, defines the purpose of the plan and the fight to get the bill signed into law.

Read More: Fans slam Waka Flocka Flame for suggesting Trump is a better president than Obama

But Donald Trump has been vocal about his dislike for the government-based health care plan that provides health insurance for many Americans. He plans to create his own that will be “better” than Obama’s, per CNN. The issue is set to appear in front of the Supreme Court a week before Election Day.

Obama took to his Twitter on Monday with a message and a link to The New Yorker story for his 124 million followers.

“In the middle of a pandemic, this administration is trying to dismantle the Affordable Care Act in the Supreme Court. Here’s how Joe and I fought to expand health care, protect millions of Americans with preexisting conditions, and actually get it done.”

Obama opens up the piece by detailing why a government based healthcare system was important to him. He says it was bigger than politics – it was personal.

“My interest in health care went beyond policy or politics; it was personal, just as it was for Teddy. Each time I met a parent struggling to come up with the money to get treatment for a sick child, I thought back to the night Michelle and I had to take three-month-old Sasha to the emergency room for what turned out to be viral meningitis. I remembered the terror and the helplessness we felt as the nurses whisked her away for a spinal tap, and the realization that we might never have caught the infection in time had the girls not had a regular pediatrician we felt comfortable calling in the middle of the night. Most of all, I thought about my mom, who had died in 1995, of uterine cancer.”

Senate Holds Confirmation Hearing For Amy Coney Barrett To Be Supreme Court Justice
While holding photographs of people who would be impacted by the elimination of the Affordable Health Care Act, Democratic Senators, from L-R, Richard Blumenthal (D-CT), Dick Durbin (D-IL), Mazie Hirono (D-HI) and Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) speak to reporters at the end of the first day of the confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill on October 12, 2020 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)em

During the final presidential debate, Trump told the audience his healthcare bill will “always protect people with

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