athletes

fitness

Meet athletes who impressed Sheikh Hamdan



a man in a blue shirt: Dubai Fitness Challenge: Meet athletes who impressed Sheikh Hamdan


© Provided by Khaleej Times
Dubai Fitness Challenge: Meet athletes who impressed Sheikh Hamdan

Meet the two Dubai-based endurance athletes who were crowned stars of this year’s Dubai Fitness Challenge by Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Crown Prince of Dubai.

Dubai residents Ghani Souleyman from Togo and Filipino national Paolo Mangilinan said they pushed themselves to the limit for the Dubai Fitness Challenge this year, and are deeply honoured with Sheikh Hamdan’s special mention.

While Souleyman ran an ultramarathon distance of 45 km per day for 30 days, Mangilinan swam 10 km per day for 30 days.

Sheikh Hamdan tweeted the duo’s pictures and said, “Well done to the two stars of the Challenge.” He added, “Thank you to everyone who took part in @DXBFitChallenge, an initiative that works to transform Dubai into one of the world’s most active and dynamic cities. It motivated us all to set tougher personal goals and actually achieve them.”

Endurance swimming coach swam for 4 hours every day

An endurance swimming coach and Dubai resident for ten years, Mangilinan said, “It was really overwhelming and an honour to receive these kind words from Sheikh Hamdan today.” For 30 days, he swam along the coast of Dubai and on one of the days of the challenge, he swam all the way to the World Islands.

He told Khaleej Times, “I would start swimming at 6:30 am everyday and would end by about 9:30 am.”

Mangilinan had a team accompany him on a kayak for safety purposes. “The kayak would carry special nutrition and hydrating drinks and something to eat.”

He added, “I think I have swum all over the coast of Dubai. Some days I would swim from Black Palace Beach to Burj Al Arab and on day 29 I swam from Kite Beach all the way to the World Islands.”

Meanwhile, Ghani Souleyman, the endurance runner from Togo told Khaleej Times, “I felt very good hearing from Sheikh Hamdan. I really appreciate the kind gesture and have a lot of gratitude towards him for organizing this event despite the pandemic. It means a lot, to hear words of encouragement from the Crown Prince.”

The endurance athlete and trainer shared footage of his runs on the Instagram handle @ghanisouley and inspired many others to run as well. On the first day of the Fitness Challenge, he did an ultramarathon on Kite Beach. He would wake up at 2:00am, run 45 km and then head to work. Mid-challenge, Ghani and Mangilinan even sent inspiring cheer messages to each other over Instagram as well.

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fitness

Watch These Calisthenics Athletes Ace the U.S. Army Fitness Test

Inspired by fellow YouTuber Stan Browney’s recent attempt, Yannick and Michael from the Calisthenics Family channel threw themselves into the U.S. Army physical fitness test (PFT) for their latest challenge video. The PFT, which assesses whether a candidate’s functional fitness is sufficient to start basic training, consists of 2 minutes of pushups, 2 minutes of situps, and a 2-mile (3.2 km) run.



Yannick and Michael from the Calisthenics Family YouTube channel tried the U.S. Army Physical Fitness Test, consisting of situps, pushups, and a 2-mile run.


© YouTube
Yannick and Michael from the Calisthenics Family YouTube channel tried the U.S. Army Physical Fitness Test, consisting of situps, pushups, and a 2-mile run.



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Given that bodyweight exercises fall very much in these guys’ wheelhouse, Yannick and Michael aren’t too concerned about the first few rounds of the test. They start off with the pushups, where a minimum of 42 reps is required in the allotted 2 minutes for a passing score. Each repetition must be completed with correct form: hands at shoulder width, and a 90-degree elbow angle at the lower end of the movement.

Yannick goes first and nails a perfect score with 76 pushups in 2 minutes, while Michael also gets full points, with one less rep at 75.

Following a 15-minute recovery period, they take on the next round: situps. The required form here involves a 90-degree knee angle, with somebody holding their feet, and they have to both touch the ground with their upper back and come all the way up for a rep to count. 50 reps are needed to pass, while 80 or above constitute a perfect score.

Yannick completes 88 reps (a perfect score) before collapsing back onto the mat, out of breath. “You’re making it tough for me now,” says Michael, who is up next and determines to do even better. This time, he narrowly beats Yannick, and wins with 89 reps. “I’m feeling kind of dizzy, man,” he says, telling Michael: “If you didn’t get 88, I would never have got 89.”

The third and final round of the PFT is the 2-mile run, where a minimum time of 15:54 is needed in order to pass. Yannick and Michael do this portion of the test together, and complete the run at the same time, with another perfect score: Yannick has a time of 10:53, while Michael finishes one or two seconds ahead of him.

“At the beginning it felt easy to run that hard,” says Michael. “Then I felt it… especially after those situps.”

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fitness

Watch These Calisthenics Athletes Try the U.S. Army Fitness Test

Inspired by fellow YouTuber Stan Browney’s recent attempt, Yannick and Michael from the Calisthenics Family channel threw themselves into the U.S. Army physical fitness test (PFT) for their latest challenge video. The PFT, which assesses whether a candidate’s functional fitness is sufficient to start basic training, consists of 2 minutes of pushups, 2 minutes of situps, and a 2-mile (3.2 km) run.

Given that bodyweight exercises fall very much in these guys’ wheelhouse, Yannick and Michael aren’t too concerned about the first few rounds of the test. They start off with the pushups, where a minimum of 42 reps is required in the allotted 2 minutes for a passing score. Each repetition must be completed with correct form: hands at shoulder width, and a 90-degree elbow angle at the lower end of the movement.

Yannick goes first and nails a perfect score with 76 pushups in 2 minutes, while Michael also gets full points, with one less rep at 75.

Following a 15-minute recovery period, they take on the next round: situps. The required form here involves a 90-degree knee angle, with somebody holding their feet, and they have to both touch the ground with their upper back and come all the way up for a rep to count. 50 reps are needed to pass, while 80 or above constitute a perfect score.

Yannick completes 88 reps (a perfect score) before collapsing back onto the mat, out of breath. “You’re making it tough for me now,” says Michael, who is up next and determines to do even better. This time, he narrowly beats Yannick, and wins with 89 reps. “I’m feeling kind of dizzy, man,” he says, telling Michael: “If you didn’t get 88, I would never have got 89.”

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The third and final round of the PFT is the 2-mile run, where a minimum time of 15:54 is needed in order to pass. Yannick and Michael do this portion of the test together, and complete the run at the same time, with another perfect score: Yannick has a time of 10:53, while Michael finishes one or two seconds ahead of him.

“At the beginning it felt easy to run that hard,” says Michael. “Then I felt it… especially after those situps.”

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fitness

Are certain athletes born to win?



Wayne Gretzky et al. posing for the camera: Wayne Gretzky may have had a competitive advantage by being born in January.


© Provided by The Gazette
Wayne Gretzky may have had a competitive advantage by being born in January.

When it comes to success in sport, there’s a lot of focus on the importance of hard work and dedication. And there’s no doubt that for many sports, the physiology you’re born with — height, body composition, cardiovascular endurance, muscle fibre type — contributes to podium finishes. But there’s another important factor that influences success, especially among young athletes, and that’s date of birth.

Known as the relative age effect, the phenomenon was publicized in the mid-1980s when researchers reported that nearly 70 per cent of minor-league hockey players were born in the first half of the year. A similar pattern has been unveiled in professional baseball, soccer and football and the NHL draft.

Like schools, youth sports group kids together by age so they can receive instruction and skills training relative to their emotional, cognitive and physical development. Yet within every cohort there is a noticeable difference on the playing field between older and younger athletes, even if there are only 12 to 48 months between the oldest and youngest in the group.

If you have kids who play competitive sports or are products of youth sports leagues, you have likely seen the relative age effect in action. Athletes born close to the start of the cycle in a cohort tend to be stronger and more mature than athletes born at the later end of the cycle. This combination of sport-friendly attributes also makes them extremely coachable — more able to follow direction, pick up new skills, apply team strategy and present a more mature demeanour. Coachability puts young athletes on the fast track to the best coaches and more competitive opportunities, which translates not just to improved athletic performance and more playing time, but also to more confidence in their skills. Meanwhile, the younger athletes in the cohort tend to leave sport earlier, and are less motivated to attend practice and put in the work necessary to move through the ranks of competitive sport.

Most of the physiological benefits related to date of birth diminish when athletes reach maturity, but just how much influence those early years have on future performance isn’t clear. Nor is it known whether male and female athletes and team and individual sports are equally affected.

To determine the lasting impact of the relative age effect, a team of U.S. researchers collected birthdates and gender of Olympians born between 1964 and 1996, creating a data set of more than 44,000 athletes — 36,030 of whom competed in the Summer Games and 8,057 in the Winter Games. Team sport athletes numbered 10,169, compared to 33,918 individual sport Olympians. Athletes were then grouped into four cohorts based on their birthdates (January-March, April-June, July-September, October-December); the researchers were interested in comparing the number of Olympians born in the first three months of the year and the number for the last three months of the year.

“The highest percentage of

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medicine

Helping athletes affected by sexual violence: my challenge to the sports and exercise medicine community

My childhood story

If you saw me in clinic as a young kid, you would almost certainly describe me as healthy, active, energetic and high achieving. I wore a smile as wide as my face and talked excitedly about my friends, sports and summer plans whenever asked. What you wouldn’t know about me was that in third grade, I was raped by a member of my extended family; and throughout middle and high school, I was sexually and emotionally abused by an alcoholic parent. You would not know this as a clinician because I always wore an impenetrable shield in order to get through my visit with you. My smile and kindness served as a mask to hide what I felt were the shameful, dark parts of me, and my costume always included some combination of athletic clothes and sports equipment.

Contrary to many recent high-profile cases,1 I was not subjected to sexual violence in sport. Yet sport was fully enmeshed in my experiences of sexual violence. Beyond the genuine joy and happiness I felt while playing sports, they provided me a necessary sense of safety and belonging outside my home and important safety from my unrelenting shame and fear. Simply put: sports saved my life.

My challenging experiences with clinicians

The summer before ninth grade, at a time when I was actively experiencing abuse, I visited my paediatrician for a preparticipation sports examination. My physician noted that I had lost a significant amount of weight since my last physical. I had never been preoccupied with my weight, but he accused me of restricting food and suggested treatment for anorexia. This was not the issue, but my truth was not important to him. He had convinced himself that he knew my struggle without even giving me the opportunity to speak my truth.

During my junior soccer season in college, after a bout with bronchitis, I found myself struggling to breathe during exercise. I met with multiple doctors and underwent numerous tests. The tests always came back negative and were often accompanied with ‘there is nothing I can do for you’ or ‘maybe it’s time to stop playing sports’. Still sidelined, my athletic trainer encouraged me to visit one more specialist who listened carefully to my symptoms and ultimately diagnosed me with exercise-induced asthma. It was a game-changer. Though grateful for that physician (and my athletic trainer), I never forgot the feeling of being unheard and not believed by those before him.

The impact of my healthcare experiences

Perhaps the most detrimental aspect of these healthcare encounters was that they reinforced my negative beliefs: that my experiences did not matter, that my voice did not matter. Trust is a central component to any clinician–patient relationship, and the ability to trust is also a major hurdle for those affected by sexual violence. To this day, I struggle seeing clinicians—not because I believe their intentions are not good or that they will harm me, but because I fear not being heard when I

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fitness

Whoop, maker of the fitness tracker that pro athletes love, is now valued at $1.2 billion

  • Whoop has closed a $100 million Series E Financing round, valuing the company at $1.2 billion.
  • Several professional athletes including Patrick Mahomes and Rory McIlroy are investors in the company
  • Whoop has seen a surge in business during the coronavirus pandemic as it has been an effective tool for some of its users in noticing early onset Covid symptoms.



Patrick Mahomes holding a frisbee: Patrick Mahomes is an investor in Whoop's latest round of funding.


© Provided by CNBC
Patrick Mahomes is an investor in Whoop’s latest round of funding.

Some of the biggest names in sports are investing in the wearable company Whoop amid a global pandemic.

The fitness tracking company announced Wednesday it closed a $100 million financing round, valuing it at $1.2 billion. 

The latest round of investors includes Super Bowl MVP Patrick Mahomes, champion golfers Rory McIlroy and

PGA Tour golfer Justin Thomas on playing amid coronavirus

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Arizona Cardinals wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald and two-time NBA Finals MVP Kevin Durant (via his business venture ThirtyFive Ventures).

Whoop makes fitness trackers that can monitor vitals like movement, sleep and workouts. It’s been the fitness tracker of choice for a number of recognizable pro athletes, and has been used to help monitor potential symptoms of Covid-19 as sports came back after play was suspended due to the pandemic in the spring.

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“I’ve always loved Whoop the product, but I learned that Whoop the business was just as good. I’m proud to be investing again in this round of financing and very excited about the company’s prospects,” McIlroy said in a statement. The four-time Majors Champion also serves as a global ambassador to Whoop.

The funding round was led by venture capital firm IVP, which will get a board seat with Whoop. Other participating investors include SoftBank Vision Fund 2, Accomplice, Two Sigma Ventures, Collaborative Fund, Thursday Ventures, Nextview Ventures, Promus Ventures, Cavu Ventures and D20 Capital.

“A lot of the capital will go towards investing in membership, the overall experience, software, analytics and hardware,” Will Ahmed, Whoop CEO said in an interview with CNBC. “It’s really about bolstering the coaching aspect of Whoop. We aspire to be a 24/7 life coach to tell you what you need to do to improve.”

The Boston-based sports wearable company got its start in 2012 and now has more than 330 employees after a surge of recent hires. Ahmed said the company has hired 200 new employees in 2020.

The company wouldn’t provide revenue numbers but said its subscribers have been growing quickly over the last 12 months due to an increased interest in health during the pandemic. Whoop has raised more than $200 million in funding to date.

“Whoop has built best-in-class wearable technology and an aspirational brand that have propelled the company to an impressive period of hypergrowth,” Eric Liaw, General Partner at IVP, said in a statement.

Ahmed said Whoop members range from professional athletes, Fortune 500 CEOs and fitness enthusiasts. The nylon band equipped with sensors is designed to gather data to measure everything from exertion levels

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