Assault

medicine

Shafiul Milky, who studied medicine in Bangladesh, is charged with rape, sexual assault in Australia

Milky, 56, studied medicine at Mymensingh Medical College in Bangladesh before migrating to Australia. He now faced 15 offences in the Geelong Magistrates’ Court, according to the report.

His patients alleged that he touched their breasts and thighs, and digitally penetrated their genitals. The alleged offences occurred between 2012 and 2019.

The case dossier mentioned Dr Milky “placed his hand on [a patient’s] breast and physically manipulated it, while being aware that [the patient] was not consenting or might not be consenting”.

He also “pulled her underwear down exposing her vagina and touched her groin area”.

In 2017, and again in March 2018, he is alleged to have raped a female patient, by “introducing his fingers in her vagina without her consent”.

All of the alleged offending was said to have occurred “under the guise of performing a legitimate medical procedure”.

In 2019, his registration was suspended by the Medical Board of Australia. However, it was reinstated, with conditions, by the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT) two months later.

Dr Milky, who received his AMC certificate from the Australian Medical Council in 2012, was restricted to practising only at approved locations and was banned from having any contact with female patients.

The ban includes consultation, interview, examination, assessment, prescribing for, advising, or otherwise treating a patient, whether it is in person or on a communication device, according to a 2019 report on oceangrovevoice.com.au based in the Bellarine.

It added that the Medical Board of Australia placed ‘gender-based restrictions’ on Dr Milky on March 25, 2019.

The Medical Board of Australia has applied to VCAT to have that decision lifted, asking that Dr Milky’s registration once again be suspended until the hearing of his review application.

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Ravaged by first wave, Italy ill-prepared as second COVID assault hits

By Giselda Vagnoni, Elvira Pollina and Emilio Parodi



a man and a woman standing in a room: Medical staff in Rome hospital treating Covid patients fear surge in infection numbers


© Reuters/YARA NARDI
Medical staff in Rome hospital treating Covid patients fear surge in infection numbers

ROME (Reuters) – One month ago, the World Health Organization posted a video praising Italians’ “strong and effective response” to the coronavirus pandemic.

At the time, Italy had one of the lowest infection rates in the Western world and appeared to have learnt the lessons of the first wave, which killed more people than anywhere else in Europe except Britain.

Now it appears that Italy, ahead of the rest of Europe when COVID-19 arrived, was simply behind the curve when it roared back as summer ended. New cases are rising at record rates, hitting 31,758 on Oct. 31 against around 2,500 at the start of the month, while deaths are up tenfold to more than 200 a day.

To be sure, many northern hemisphere countries are also facing a coronavirus resurgence. But just as Italy became a symbol of the perils of the virus, so its inability to protect against a second wave has underscored Europe’s failure to use the summer lull to bolster its defences, notably in tracing and testing.

“It is a monumental debacle. The fact that Italy is in the same situation as other countries in Europe is no comfort to me,” virologist Andrea Crisanti told Reuters. “We had five months to strengthen our surveillance, tracking and prevention systems and instead we are heading towards a new lockdown.”

The government says it wants to avoid another national lockdown and denies failing to anticipate a second wave.

“There may have been mistakes, you can always do better but we have not underestimated the situation. We have worked on all fronts,” Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte said last week.

Crisanti, who has become a celebrity with his dogged demands for more testing, published a letter with nine colleagues on Friday listing what they said were the government’s failings, along with recommendations.

One shortcoming, they said, was the system Italy had adopted to trace those who had contact with COVID sufferers and make sure they were tested.

In June, the government employed 9,000 people for this. That has risen to just 9,200, a third of the number Germany employs. The state placed adverts last week to recruit another 2,000.

“We warned the authorities from the very beginning that we would have needed much more people, and people professionally trained, for tracing COVID-19,” said Miria De Santis, head of the national association of health assistants.

“I think the authorities overlooked the risk of the second wave,” she told Reuters.

PRIVACY PROBLEMS

Franco Locatelli, a leading member of the scientific committee that advises the government, denies the state lowered its guard, but acknowledges that the tracing system has been overwhelmed.

“COVID-19 tracking and testing is absolutely crucial but beyond a certain number of infections, it cracks. I meet 20, 30 people every day, the incubation period of the disease is 2, 3 days. With the current numbers, it means

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health

FBI warns ransomware assault threatens US health care system

BOSTON (AP) — Federal agencies warned that cybercriminals could unleash a wave of data-scrambling extortion attempts against the U.S. health care system, an effort that, if successful, could paralyze hospital information systems just as nationwide cases of COVID-19 are spiking.

In a joint alert Wednesday, the FBI and two federal agencies said they had credible information of “an increased and imminent cybercrime threat” to U.S. hospitals and health care providers. The alert said malicious groups are targeting the sector with attacks aiming for “data theft and disruption of healthcare services.”

The impact of the expected attack wave is difficult to assess.


It involves a particular strain of ransomware, which scrambles a target’s data into gibberish until they pay up. Previous such attacks on health care facilities have impeded care and, in one case in Germany, led to the death of a patient, but such consequences are still rare.

The federal warning itself could help stave off the worst consequences, either by leading hospitals to take additional precautions or by expanding efforts to knock down the systems cybercriminals use to launch such attacks.

The offensive coincides with the U.S. presidential election, although there is no immediate indication the cybercriminals involved are motivated by anything but profit. The federal alert was co-authored by the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Health and Human Services.

Independent security experts say the ransomware, called Ryuk, has already impacted at least five U.S. hospitals this week and could potentially affect hundreds more. Four health care institutions have been reported hit by ransomware so far this week, three belonging to the St. Lawrence Health System in upstate New York and the Sky Lakes Medical Center in Klamath Falls, Oregon.

Sky Lakes acknowledged the ransomware attack in an online statement, saying it had no evidence that patient information was compromised. It said emergency and urgent care “remain available.”

The St. Lawrence system also acknowledged a Tuesday ransomware attack, noting in a statement released Thursday that no patient or employee data appeared to have been accessed or compromised. Matthew Denner, the emergency services director for St. Lawrence County, told the Adirondack Daily Enterprise that the hospital owner instructed the county to divert ambulances from two of the affected hospitals for a few hours Tuesday. The company did not return requests for comment on that report.

Alex Holden, CEO of Hold Security, which has been closely tracking Ryuk for more than a year, said the attack could be unprecedented in magnitude for the U.S. In a statement, Charles Carmakal, chief technical officer of the security firm Mandiant, said the cyberthreat could be the “most significant” the country has ever seen.

The U.S. has seen a plague of ransomware over the past 18 months or so, with major cities from Baltimore to Atlanta hit and local governments and schools walloped especially hard.

In September, a ransomware attack hobbled all 250 U.S. facilities of the hospital chain Universal Health Services, forcing doctors and nurses to rely on paper and pencil

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FBI warns ransomware assault threatens U.S. healthcare system

BOSTON — Federal agencies warned that cybercriminals are unleashing a wave of data-scrambling extortion attempts against the U.S. healthcare system designed to lock up hospital information systems, which could hurt patient care just as nationwide cases of COVID-19 are spiking.

In a joint alert Wednesday, the FBI and two federal agencies warned that they had “credible information of an increased and imminent cybercrime threat to U.S. hospitals and healthcare providers.” The alert said malicious groups are targeting the sector with attacks that produce “data theft and disruption of healthcare services.”

The cyberattacks involve ransomware, which scrambles data into gibberish that can only be unlocked with software keys provided once targets pay up. Independent security experts say it has already hobbled at least five U.S. hospitals this week, and could potentially impact hundreds more.

The offensive by a Russian-speaking criminal gang coincides with the U.S. presidential election, although there is no immediate indication they were motivated by anything but profit. “We are experiencing the most significant cyber security threat we’ve ever seen in the United States,” Charles Carmakal, chief technical officer of the cybersecurity firm Mandiant, said in a statement.

Alex Holden, CEO of Hold Security, which has been closely tracking the ransomware in question for more than a year, agreed that the unfolding offensive is unprecedented in magnitude for the U.S. given its timing in the heat of a contentions presidential election and the worst global pandemic in a century.

The federal alert was co-authored by the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Health and Human Services.

The cybercriminals launching the attacks use a strain of ransomware known as Ryuk, which is seeded through a network of zombie computers called Trickbot that Microsoft began trying to counter earlier in October. U.S. Cyber Command has also reportedly taken action against Trickbot. While Microsoft has had considerable success knocking its command-and-control servers offline through legal action, analysts say criminals have still been finding ways to spread Ryuk.

Health systems with a presence on Long Island said they’ve aware of threats.

“Northwell Health is doing everything we can to remain vigilant against any potential attack,” said John Bosco, senior vice president and chief information officer at Northwell Health, the largest health system in the state.

Rockville Centre-based Catholic Health Services of Long Island said it has invested in technologies to ensure a secure environment for patient information.

“In addition, we are currently increasing awareness of phishing activity that is often the entry point for ransomware.” said Tim Swope, chief information security officer at CHS.

The U.S. has seen a plague of ransomware over the past 18 months or so, with major cities from Baltimore to Atlanta hit and local governments and schools hit especially hard.

In September, a ransomware attack hobbled all 250 U.S. facilities of the hospital chain Universal Health Services, forcing doctors and nurses to rely

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health

FBI warns ransomware assault threatens US healthcare system

BOSTON (AP) — Federal agencies warned that cybercriminals are unleashing a wave of data-scrambling extortion attempts against the U.S. healthcare system designed to lock up hospital information systems, which could hurt patient care just as nationwide cases of COVID-19 are spiking.

In a joint alert Wednesday, the FBI and two federal agencies warned that they had “credible information of an increased and imminent cybercrime threat to U.S. hospitals and healthcare providers.” The alert said malicious groups are targeting the sector with attacks that produce “data theft and disruption of healthcare services.”

The cyberattacks involve ransomware, which scrambles data into gibberish that can only be unlocked with software keys provided once targets pay up. Independent security experts say it has already hobbled at least five U.S. hospitals this week, and could potentially impact hundreds more.

The offensive by a Russian-speaking criminal gang coincides with the U.S. presidential election, although there is no immediate indication they were motivated by anything but profit. “We are experiencing the most significant cyber security threat we’ve ever seen in the United States,” Charles Carmakal, chief technical officer of the cybersecurity firm Mandiant, said in a statement.

Alex Holden, CEO of Hold Security, which has been closely tracking the ransomware in question for more than a year, agreed that the unfolding offensive is unprecedented in magnitude for the U.S. given its timing in the heat of a contentions presidential election and the worst global pandemic in a century.

The federal alert was co-authored by the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Health and Human Services.


The cybercriminals launching the attacks use a strain of ransomware known as Ryuk, which is seeded through a network of zombie computers called Trickbot that Microsoft began trying to counter earlier in October. U.S. Cyber Command has also reportedly taken action against Trickbot. While Microsoft has had considerable success knocking its command-and-control servers offline through legal action, analysts say criminals have still been finding ways to spread Ryuk.

The U.S. has seen a plague of ransomware over the past 18 months or so, with major cities from Baltimore to Atlanta hit and local governments and schools hit especially hard.

In September, a ransomware attack hobbled all 250 U.S. facilities of the hospital chain Universal Health Services, forcing doctors and nurses to rely on paper and pencil for record-keeping and slowing lab work. Employees described chaotic conditions impeding patient care, including mounting emergency room waits and the failure of wireless vital-signs monitoring equipment.

Also in September, the first known fatality related to ransomware occurred in Duesseldorf, Germany, when an IT system failure forced a critically ill patient to be routed to a hospital in another city.

Holden said he alerted federal law enforcement Friday after monitoring infection attempts at a number of hospitals, some of which may have beaten back infections. The FBI did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

He said the group was demanding ransoms well above $10 million per target and that criminals involved on the

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Knowing What to Expect May Help After Sexual Assault | Health News

By Steven Reinberg, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

SATURDAY, Oct. 24, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Sexual assault is common in America, with an attack occurring every 73 seconds. But having supportive care at the emergency department and afterwards can help heal the trauma, Penn State doctors say.

One in five women is raped during their lifetime, yet only 25% report it, according to the National Sexual Violence Resource Center. The closer the relationship is between the victim and the offender, the more likely it won’t be reported, says the U.S. Department of Justice. Even when attackers aren’t known, more than half the victims do not report their assaults.

“It’s a very traumatic event,” said Debbie Medley, an assistant nurse manager in the emergency department at Penn State Health Medical Center. “It takes quite a bit of emotional strength for somebody to decide that they want to report it and seek help,” she added in a Penn State news release.

If you are in immediate danger, you should call 911 to request assistance, Medley said. “But there are ways to report the assault other than just picking up the phone and calling 911 or your local police department,” she noted.

The Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network’s national hotline can connect you with trained staff from a local sexual assault service. Victims of sexual assault can also go directly to any local emergency room for treatment.

Medley stressed that in the emergency room it’s important to provide patients with as much control as possible during the forensic exam.

“Among the equipment in our dedicated exam room, we have a clicker that enables the patient to take their own photograph, should they agree to have photographs taken during the exam,” Medley said.

Sexual assault examiners should know the state’s regulations and required documentation and how to report the assault to the police — if that’s what the victim wants.

“Even though the assault will be documented by us, it doesn’t mean that a report must be filed with the police,” Medley said. Pennsylvania law, for example, allows victims to have the sexual assault evidence kit collected and tested anonymously — without their name attached to it, she added.

“They can have that reassurance that they’ll get the medical treatment they need, when they need it. They’ll get connected to support services to help them navigate the emotional trauma of their assault. And they’ll have the peace of mind that while they might not want to report the crime yet, we have the evidence kit if they ever change their mind,” Medley said.

Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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