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Sunday Times – Residents in quarantined CMC flats asked to submit medicine list to police or UDA officer in the premises

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Those residing in quarantined urban flats in Colombo Municipal Council area are requested to submit their dispensary/hospital medicine prescription if suffering from long term, chronic health conditions, Director General of Health Services Dr. Asela Gunawardena has requested.


Residents of Muwadora Uyana, Sirimuthu Uyana, Sirisanda Sevana, Randiya Uyana, Methsada Sevana, Minijaya Sevana, Ranmit Sevana, Sathhiru Sevana, N.H.S. Maligawatte in Colombo city who suffer from diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, epilepsy, wheezing, high blood cholesterol, kidney disease and cancer are requested to inform the police officer or the person from the Urban Development Authority in charge of their floors about such illnesses and the need to get medicine.


They will be required to submit their name, age, address and name of the dispensary or hospital they usually get medicine from.


Dr. Gunawardena said the monthly medicine pack will be delivered by the officers and requested the residents to avoid leaving their houses.

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health

Voters asked to approve $5.5 billion for stem cell research

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The future of California’s first-of-its-kind stem cell research program is in the hands of voters, who will decide whether it deserves a $5.5 billion infusion of borrowed bond money to keep functioning.

A yes vote on Proposition 14 on Tuesday’s ballot would approve such a bond sale, bailing out the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, which was created by a similar $3 billion bond measure in 2014 but is now nearly broke.

With dozens of clinical trials involving the use of stem cells to treat cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, paralysis, autoimmune diseases and other conditions underway at universities across California, supporters say it is crucial to keep that money flowing.


“Trials that use human embryonic derived stem cells to treat diabetes, to treat blindness and to treat spinal cord injury, those trials are early but already showing signs of patient benefit,” said professor Larry Goldstein, who directs the stem cell research program at the University of California, San Diego. “Losing those trials would be a terrible tragedy for those patients.”

Opponents say the state simply can’t afford to take on that kind of debt during a pandemic-induced economic crisis. What’s more, they say, there isn’t as much need for California to bankroll stem cell research now that the federal government and private investors have turned their attention to it.

“We built something good, but I think the field has expanded and there’s plenty of money going into research in California now,” said Jeff Sheehy, who sits on the governing board of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine but says the state can’t afford to borrow more bond money to support it.

When voters approved the initial $3 billion in 2004, President George W. Bush’s administration had banned the use of federal funds for research using newly created human embryonic stem cell lines. The Obama administration lifted that ban in 2009.

Since then, opponents say, the National Institutes of Health has provided $1.5 billion a year in stem cell research money, while private investment in companies doing stem cell research has flowed in.

Supporters say that federal money could stop at any time, noting more than 90 members of Congress recently signed a letter demanding the Trump administration put an end to funding stem cell research.

More than a third of the initial $3 billion was spent to create stem cell research facilities at Stanford, the University of California, Berkeley, and other prestigious California institutions. Much of the rest has gone toward research.

With only about $30 million left, the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine has reduced its staff and stopped funding new studies.

If Proposition 14 passes, at least $1.5 billion would be earmarked for developing treatments for Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and other brain-related diseases. Some funds would be used to train California university and college students, and no more 7.5% could be used for administrative costs.

The state Legislative Analyst’s Office estimates that paying off the bonds with interest over 30 years would cost $7.8

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Covid-positive health workers asked to keep working as crisis worsens

Health workers in some hospitals in Liege, Belgium’s third largest city and a coronavirus hotspot, have been asked to continue working even if they test positive for Covid-19 — as long as they are not showing any symptoms of the disease.



a woman sitting at a table using a laptop computer: A medical worker wearing a protective equipment tends to a patient at the intensive care unit for patients infected with Covid-19 (novel coronavirus) at The University Hospital Centre in Liege, Belgium on October 22, 2020. Belgium, is experiencing one of the worst second waves of the epidemic in the world, and with 10,539 deaths in a country of 11.5 million people, one of the deadliest outbreaks per capita.


© Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP/Getty Images
A medical worker wearing a protective equipment tends to a patient at the intensive care unit for patients infected with Covid-19 (novel coronavirus) at The University Hospital Centre in Liege, Belgium on October 22, 2020. Belgium, is experiencing one of the worst second waves of the epidemic in the world, and with 10,539 deaths in a country of 11.5 million people, one of the deadliest outbreaks per capita.

Top health official have warned that Belgium could run out of intensive care beds in as little as two weeks and some hospitals are facing staff shortages. The country of 11.5 million people has reported on average more than 13,000 cases a day in the past week, according to the national public health institute Sciensano. The Covid-19 outbreak in Belgium is the second worst in Europe in terms of new cases per capita, after only the Czech Republic.

Yves Van Laethem, Belgium’s spokesperson for the fight against the coronavirus, warned that unless Belgians change their behavior, intensive care units will reach their capacity of 2,000 patients in 15 days.

Liege, the largest city in the French-speaking Wallonia region, has the highest incidence rate in Belgium. Tje communications director of Liege University Hospital, Louis Maraite, told CNN on Tuesday that because of staff shortages, the hospital had “no choice” but to make doctors and nurses who tested positive but have no symptoms come to work.

“This is not a problem as they are working in coronavirus units with patients who also tested positive,” he added. Maraite said that health workers with Covid-19 accounted for 5% to 10% of the total hospital workforce.

Health workers who show symptoms, such as fever, have been asked not to come to work, and Maraite said the hospital could not force asymptomatic health workers to show up.

Another Liège hospital, CHC MontLégia, also confirmed to CNN that positive asymptomatic health workers have been asked to continue working on a voluntary basis and in the “strict observance of sanitary measures” that include limiting contact with their colleagues.

The spokesperson for the private hospital’s communication department told CNN that positive asymptomatic staff are working mainly in Covid-19 units but can work across all units including those with non-covid patients, except the geriatric, neonatology and oncology departments, where patients are “particularly vulnerable”.

A spokeswoman for the Belgian Health Ministry told CNN allowing asymptomatic health workers to continue working is allowed in “very strict conditions” because there are not enough health care workers. “We try to ensure the security of all patients,” she added.

At a news conference Monday, Van Laethem said that 1,000 of the country’s intensive beds are already being used, with total of 1,250 set to be occupied by the end of the

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Coronavirus cases linked to live music event at Virginia restaurant, attendees asked to self-quarantine

A live music event at a restaurant in Henrico, Va., is linked to a “cluster” of cases of the novel coronavirus, local health officials said this week when encouraging residents who may have been exposed to self-quarantine and monitor themselves for symptoms of COVID-19 over the next 14 days. 

Anyone who attended the live music event on Oct. 9 at JJ’s Grille on Staples Mill Road may have been exposed to the coronavirus, said officials with the Henrico County Health Department (HCHD) in a news release posted to the Virginia Department of Health website. 

Dr. Danny Avula, the director of Richmond’s and Henrico’s health districts, told the Richmond Times-Dispatch that the restaurant voluntarily closed for a temporary period of time after the cases were identified. (iStock)

Dr. Danny Avula, the director of Richmond’s and Henrico’s health districts, told the Richmond Times-Dispatch that the restaurant voluntarily closed for a temporary period of time after the cases were identified. (iStock)

“While there have been no reported cases of exposure associated with live music or group events held on dates before October 9, HCHD is still evaluating the potential for further exposures and would recommend that individuals who have visited the establishment after October 9 monitor for symptoms and consider being tested for COVID-19 infection,” health officials said. 

Dr. Danny Avula, the director of Richmond’s and Henrico’s health districts, told the Richmond Times-Dispatch that the restaurant voluntarily closed for a temporary period of time after the cases were identified. 

CAN MOUTHWASH PROTECT AGAINST CORONAVIRUS? EXPERTS DISCUSS RESULTS OF VIRAL STUDY

“In an office setting, you know everybody who works in the office and spent 15 minutes within 6 feet of an affected individual, but at these types of settings, it’s harder to do that,” Avula said of why the health district publically announced the outbreak, as a “lack of cooperation with contact tracing efforts and delays in testing” impacted health official’s efforts to notify everyone who could have been exposed, the newspaper reported. 

CDC REDEFINES CORONAVIRUS ‘CLOSE CONTACT’ TO INCLUDE MULTIPLE BRIEF EXPOSURES TO VIRUS

Officials did not provide a number of people who have tested positive, but Avula said some 75 people, including staff and restaurant patrons, have been contacted. 

CLICK HERE FOR COMPLETE  CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

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