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Newswire Supports Fitness Companies as They Educate Americans on Wellness During Unprecedented Pandemic – Press Release

With gyms and health centers facing difficulties this winter, many fitness leaders are turning toward online content to educate both businesses and individuals.


NEW YORK – November 17, 2020 – (Newswire.com)

​Newswire’s Earned Media Advantage Guided Tour has acted as a reliable resource for fitness companies that are looking to stay in front of their target audience with educational material and virtual workouts. This will be increasingly valuable with the American people likely heading into another lockdown period this winter; leaders in the fitness industry have already begun to pivot their communications strategies to remain relevant. 

“Information sessions and online content will be crucial for fitness companies in the months to come, as tactics related to virtual experiences and in-person safety will give gyms, yoga studios, and wellness centers a chance to stay in business during the unpredictable winter months,” said Charlie Terenzio, Newswire’s VP Earned Media Advantage Business. 

This past summer, many gyms across the U.S. were allowed to re-open at limited capacities. This provided fitness enthusiasts with the opportunity to get back to working out in a public setting, and it provided gym owners with the chance to generate revenue after an extended period of forced closures. 

Pamela Kufahl, Content Director for Club Industry, noted in a recent article how UKactive, Europeactive, IHRSA, FIT Summit, and Mercado Fitness will have speakers present during the global Future of Fitness virtual event. The sessions will feature discussions regarding the challenges that the fitness industry faces as a whole, and speakers will provide insight to businesses looking to survive and thrive in the months to come. 

Newswire’s Earned Media Advantage Guided Tour Market Builder supplies fitness professionals and C-suite executives with the ability to launch educational content campaigns to help position their brand as an industry leader for trending approaches to modern fitness. 

Fitness companies have used Newswire’s EMA GT Market Builder to educate fellow executives as the industry looks to survive as a whole. The platform has also been effective in distributing relevant information regarding new mobile apps and at-home workouts for gym-goers that may be reluctant to exercise in public spaces as the pandemic progresses this winter.  

Learn how Newswire’s Earned Media Advantage Guided Tour Market Builder can help your brand gain a competitive advantage through industry leadership today.

About Newswire

Newswire delivers press release and multimedia distribution software and services (SaaS) that empower the Earned Media Advantage: greater brand awareness, increased traffic, greater return on media and marketing communications spend and the competitive edge. With over a decade of experience, Newswire continues to provide its customers with the ability to deliver the right message to the right audience at the right time through the right medium.

To learn more about how Newswire can help you, visit http://www.newswire.com.

Contact Information

Charlie Terenzio
VP of Earned Media Advantage Business 
Newswire
Office: 813-480-3766
Email: [email protected]

Press Release Service
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Newswire.com

Original Source:

Newswire Supports Fitness Companies as They Educate Americans on Wellness During Unprecedented Pandemic

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health

More Americans on diets from a decade ago, report finds

More Americans said they’re on diets to lose weight or for other health reasons compared with a decade ago

NEW YORK — If it seems like more and more people are on diets these days, you might not be imagining it.

The increase comes as obesity rates have continued to climb. The CDC report found that 17% of Americans said they were on diets during the 2017-2018 survey period, up from 14% a decade earlier. Over the same period obesity rates rose in the U.S. to 42% of Americans, up from 34%.

The report notes that about half of American adults have diet-related chronic conditions, such as diabetes and heart disease, and that special diets are a way many people try to manage them. Hunnes cautioned, though, that many people might not consider the way they eat to be a diet.

The report also looked at responses between 2015 and 2018 to determine other characteristics of people on special diets:

—The heavier and more educated people were, the more likely they were to report being on a special diet. The report found 23% of Americans who are obese said they were on diets, compared with 17% of overweight people and 8% of people who were normal weight or underweight.

—More women reported being on a diet than men.

—18% of non-Hispanic white Americans, 16% of Hispanic Americans and 15% of Asian and Black Americans said they were diets.

—A higher percentage of people 40 and older said they were on diets than those ages 20 to 39.

—Between 2007-08 and 2017-18, diets described as “weight loss or low calorie” grew in popularity, and remained the top category of special diet. Low-carbohydrate diets gained in popularity, while low-fat and low-cholesterol saw a decline.

The findings were based on an ongoing national survey in which participants were asked: “Are you currently on any kind of diet, either to lose weight or for some other health-related reason?”

Becky Ramsing, a registered dietitian and senior program officer at Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, said that the dietary changes people make in hopes of losing weight can vary greatly. And in some cases, she said people might not understand why the choices they’re making aren’t leading to weight loss.

“They won’t eat bread, but then they’ll go eat a lot of other things that are higher in calories,” she said.

Many diet trends

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health

Americans head to polls amid harrowing surge in cases and hospitalizations

As Americans head to the voting booths Tuesday, the devastating Covid-19 pandemic looms: surging across the US yet again, setting grim records and forecast to take tens of thousands more lives across the country in the coming months.



a person wearing a blue hat: BOSTON, MA - OCTOBER 22: An RN hands off a coronavirus sample to medical assistant Bettie Cleveland at a COVID-19 testing site set up by Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center at Prince Hall Grand Lodge in Grove Hall in Boston's Dorchester on Oct. 22, 2020. Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center set up mobile testing to help their community members who were disproportionally affected by COVID-19, the neighborhoods of Dorchester, Roxbury and Mattapan have seen some of the highest incident rates of the Coronavirus in Boston. In July of 2020 they began to administer tests in the city at various locations. The Grove Hall location is available for walk up testing every Thursday at the Prince Hall Grand Lodge from 10:00am - 3:00 PM. (Photo by Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)


© Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe/Getty Images
BOSTON, MA – OCTOBER 22: An RN hands off a coronavirus sample to medical assistant Bettie Cleveland at a COVID-19 testing site set up by Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center at Prince Hall Grand Lodge in Grove Hall in Boston’s Dorchester on Oct. 22, 2020. Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center set up mobile testing to help their community members who were disproportionally affected by COVID-19, the neighborhoods of Dorchester, Roxbury and Mattapan have seen some of the highest incident rates of the Coronavirus in Boston. In July of 2020 they began to administer tests in the city at various locations. The Grove Hall location is available for walk up testing every Thursday at the Prince Hall Grand Lodge from 10:00am – 3:00 PM. (Photo by Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

Experts have warned this bout with the virus will be the worst one yet — and alarming trends are already pointing in that direction. In just one month, the country’s 7-day case average nearly doubled. Last week, the US reported 99,321 new cases — the highest single day number of infections recorded for any country. And at least 31 states set daily infection records last month.

Hospitalizations are also surging, with the number of patients nationwide rising by more than 10,000 in just two weeks, according to data from the COVID Tracking Project. Hospitals in some parts of the country have hit their “breaking point.”

Hospital officials in El Paso, Texas, are now preparing to open the city’s civic center as an overflow medical facility and add a fourth mobile morgue.

And when hospitalizations climb, deaths are likely to follow, doctors have warned.

The virus’s spread has already changed the way Americans vote, as tens of millions of people have already voted by mail or prior to Election Day. People recovering from Covid-19 or quarantining from being exposed to the virus can still go vote, a spokesman for the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told CNN.

More than 231,500 people have died in the US and researchers from the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation project a total of about 399,163 American lives lost by February 1.

The numbers will likely get worse before they get better and officials worry the upcoming holidays — and the gatherings that will come with them — will further fuel an already rampant spread into the winter months.

But it doesn’t have to be this way. Public health measures touted by experts for months — including face masks, social distancing and regular hand washing — can help hold the virus down.

Health resources ‘stretched beyond belief’

At least 36 states are reporting more new cases than the previous week while only five

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health

US coronavirus: Americans head to polls amid harrowing Covid 19 surge

And when hospitalizations climb, deaths are likely to follow, doctors have warned.

More than 231,500 people have died in the US and researchers from the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation project a total of about 399,163 American lives lost by February 1.

The numbers will likely get worse before they get better and officials worry the upcoming holidays — and the gatherings that will come with them — will further fuel an already rampant spread into the winter months. But it doesn’t have to be this way. Public health measures touted by experts for months — including face masks, social distancing and regular hand washing — can help hold the virus down.

Health resources ‘stretched beyond belief’

At least 36 states are reporting more new cases than the previous week while only five — Alabama, Hawaii, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Tennessee — are reporting a decline, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

Working to combat the pandemic’s grip, some state leaders have pushed new measures in hopes of slowing the spread of the virus.

In Connecticut, Gov. Ned Lamont announced new guidelines including limiting restaurants to 50% capacity, with no more than eight people at a table and limiting indoor event spaces and theaters, among other restrictions. Lamont also recommended residents stay home between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m., a move he said would help limit socializing.

A 13-year-old Missouri boy's last day of school was in late October. He died from Covid-19 days later
Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker on Monday announced a Stay-At-Home advisory, which will be in effect from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. All gatherings — limited to 10 people in homes indoors and 25 people outside — need to end by 9:30 p.m., he said. Everyone over the age of 5 will also be required to wear a face covering in public.

Meanwhile in West Virginia, the governor sounded the alarm on the state’s infection rate and the resources stretched thin.

“When it boils right down to it, what I have done now I’ve taken an even more drastic step in trying to provide testing and our National Guard, local health departments are now being tested beyond belief and being stretched beyond belief,” Gov. Jim Justice said.

Justice pointed to pandemic fatigue — what many other officials say is contributing to Covid-19 spread — as a major reason why the virus is running rampant in the state.

“For the most part, most of us are concerned,” he added. “Most of us are doing the right stuff. But most of us aren’t really concerned to the level that we really truly should be.”

CDC: People who have Covid-19 or who were exposed can go vote

For those who are hoping to cast their ballot Tuesday, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told CNN people recovering from Covid-19 or quarantining from being exposed to the virus can go vote — safely.
Several battleground states seeing surge of new Covid-19 cases

“In-person voting can be carried out safely following CDC’s recommendations for polling location and voters,” a CDC spokesperson wrote in a Monday email.

Voters who are sick or in

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health

How Many Americans Now on Special Diets?

Almost one in five adults in the U.S. said they ate a “special diet” from 2015 to 2018, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data showed.

Among adults ages 20 and older, 17.1% reported that they stuck to a special diet on any given day, according to Bryan Stierman, MD, MPH, of the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) in Hyattsville, Maryland, and colleagues.

This percentage is substantially bigger than in previous years: 14.3% of U.S. adults followed any special type of diet in 2007 to 2008.

“About one-half of U.S. adults have diet-related chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, or type 2 diabetes,” the researchers wrote. “Special diets are one way that many adults prevent, treat, and manage such diseases.”

The study, published as an NCHS Data Brief, also pinpointed a low-calorie or weight-loss oriented diet as the most popular choice of diet, used by nearly 10% of all adults. Next was a diabetic diet, followed by 2.3% of adults on any given day, followed by low-carbohydrate (2%) and low-fat or low-cholesterol diets (1.8%).

Stierman’s group drew upon data from the cross-sectional NHANES. Dietary information was obtained via 23-hour dietary recall interviews with trained interviewers. “Special diets” were considered to be an affirmative response to the question: “Are you currently on any kind of diet, either to lose weight or for some other health-related reason?”

There was some variance of diet popularity according to age group, but a weight loss or low-calorie diet was overwhelmingly the favorite across every age group, Stierman and co-authors reported.

Diabetic diets were nearly twice as popular among those age 60 and over, used by about 4.7% of these adults. A low-sodium diet was another of the most popular diets among this older group (3%). Overall, more adults in this age group used any type of special diet compared with any other age group.

Interestingly, a “weight gain” diet was followed by 0.7% of those between the ages of 20 and 39, but not by any of the other age groups.

By 2017-2018, the popularity of weight loss and low-carb diets had a significant gain in popularity compared with 2007-2008. On the other hand, low-fat and low-cholesterol diets dropped off significantly in popularity, possibly due to the recent rising trend for the ketogenic diet, the researchers speculated.

Adherence to special diets also varied according to sex and race. Specifically, women tended to diet more than men, with 19% of U.S. women reported being on a diet on any given day vs 15.1% of men. And more than 20% of women over the age of 40 adhered to a special diet, the data showed.

More so than any other race, white adults were more likely to adhere to a special diet, with about 18% of non-Hispanic white adults reporting sticking to a diet. About 16.4% of Hispanic adults stuck to a diet, while only 14.7% and 14.9% of Black and Asian adults, respectively, reported dieting.

When broken down by educational levels,

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health

A survivor. A funeral director. A marriage divided. How Americans’ COVID experiences shape their votes

HOUSTON, TEXAS-JULY 1, 2020-HOUSTON, TEXAS-JULY 1, 2020-Putting a patient on a ventilator is a last resort. Dr. Joseph Varon, center, does emergency treatment on Terry Hill, age 65, after putting him on a ventilator assisted by his team of nurses and medical students. At United Memorial Medical Center in Houston, Texas, Dr. Joseph Varon leads a team to fight the increasing number of coronavirus patients in the expanded Covid-19 ward on July 1, 2020. (Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times)
Dr. Joseph Varon, center, does emergency treatment on a COVID-19 patient at United Memorial Medical Center in Houston this summer. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

In Wisconsin, a funeral home director who has watched the COVID-19 pandemic rip through her community can only blame President Trump.

In Texas, little can change one woman’s loyalty to the president — not even her own struggle for breath as she lay in a hospital bed.

In New Mexico, an underemployed firearms instructor plans to cast his vote as a rebuke to Democrats he says were overzealous in closing businesses.

In Arizona, a Joe Biden voter found political detente with his Republican wife as the lingering effects of infection continue to cause them pain.

In Michigan, a school bus driver won over by the president before the pandemic deepened her devotion and took up arms to protest shutdowns.

Even before the coronavirus sunk in its teeth, the United States was deeply polarized. Facts mattered less than feelings and political parties acted like tribes.

The virus — a shared, microscopic enemy that demanded a unified response — offered the nation a chance to come together. But from face masks to shutdowns, the pandemic quickly became the main thing Americans were fighting over.

As the death toll grew so did anxieties about who would win the presidency.

Election day arrives as the virus surges like never before, with an average of more than 80,000 new cases reported each day last week — well over previous spikes and up more than 44% from two weeks earlier.

Once concentrated in urban centers like New York and later in Sun Belt states, the virus is now ravaging the rural Midwest and Rocky Mountain states.

Field hospitals have been pitched in parking lots from Texas to Wisconsin. In the past week, hospitalizations reached new highs in 18 different states.

Treatment is improving and infections are increasingly concentrated in younger people with high odds of survival, but experts predict a significant rise in the U.S. death toll, which now tops 230,000.

The surge poses a dilemma for officials trying to balance health concerns with economic ones as the public grows wary of more forced shutdowns.

Polls suggest that most voters have made up their minds — and record numbers have already cast their ballots.

All of the issues that divided America before coronavirus have been eclipsed.

This is the pandemic election. And these are the stories of five voters.

The funeral home director

The first call came in late March.

A 70-year-old had died shortly after being taken off a ventilator. Michelle Pitts sent a hearse to pick up his body from the hospital.

Michelle Pitts, owner of New Pitts Mortuary, stands outside her Milwaukee funeral home.
Michelle Pitts, owner of New Pitts Mortuary, stands outside her Milwaukee funeral home. (Kurtis Lee / Los Angeles Times)

There would be no funeral, just a burial at the cemetery attended by three relatives. The family was too worried about contagion.

Pitts was left with the feeling that “this virus was going to be

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medicine

The long shadow of racism in medicine leaves Black Americans wary of a COVID-19 vaccine




a close up of a sign


© Yahoo News



As the coronavirus pandemic has progressed, and the need for a vaccine has become more urgent and apparent, the number of Americans who say they would take such a vaccine keeps falling. In particular, Black Americans — who have been among those hit hardest by the pandemic — are resistant to the idea. A new Yahoo News/YouGov poll found that only 27 percent of Black Americans and 46 percent of white Americans plan to get a coronavirus vaccine if and when one becomes available.  

The perceived politicization of the vaccine process and unprecedented pace of Operation Warp Speed has led to doubts nationwide. Until very recently, President Trump was predicting that a vaccine could arrive ahead of Election Day, Nov. 3, contradicting members of his own coronavirus task force, who have repeatedly given less optimistic time frames that have turned out to be more realistic. 

But whether a vaccine is ready next month or next year, many Americans may not trust it, even after it is approved by the Food and Drug Administration. A Kaiser Family Foundation survey published in September found that 62 percent of Americans worry that political pressure from the Trump administration will lead the FDA to rush to approve a coronavirus vaccine without making sure it’s safe and effective. Whether that will change if a new administration is in office after Jan. 20 remains to be seen.

Dr. Peter Marks, director of the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research at the FDA and self-proclaimed “FDA point person on COVID-19 vaccines,” wrote an op-ed Tuesday in USA Today attempting to alleviate those concerns.

“We hope to ensure public confidence in COVID-19 vaccines by being transparent about FDA’s decision-making process,” he wrote. “Whether a vaccine is made available through an EUA [emergency use authorization] or through a traditional approval, FDA will ensure that it is safe and effective.

“Trust means everything.”

Trust, experts say, is crucial to Americans’ willingness to accept a COVID-19 vaccine. But for many Black Americans, that trust will be difficult to earn after a long history of exploitation and abuse by the health care system has led them to be wary of the U.S. medical establishment. 



Bill Clinton wearing a suit and tie: Herman Shaw speaks during ceremonies at the White House on May 16, 1997, in which President Bill Clinton apologized to the survivors and families of the victims of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study. (Paul J. Richards/AFP via Getty Images)


© Provided by Yahoo! News
Herman Shaw speaks during ceremonies at the White House on May 16, 1997, in which President Bill Clinton apologized to the survivors and families of the victims of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study. (Paul J. Richards/AFP via Getty Images)

The Tuskegee Syphilis Study is the most famous example. Sponsored by the U.S. Public Health Service, the project enrolled uneducated Black men in the South without informing them of the purpose of the experiment, which was to study the natural progression of the disease. Participants went untreated for years after an effective cure had been discovered. A 1972 Associated Press story on the experiments, observing that “human beings with syphilis” had been “induced to serve as guinea pigs,” caused public outcry and finally brought the study to an end after 40

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health

Donald Trump Jr. said covid-19 deaths are at ‘almost nothing.’ The virus killed more than 1,000 Americans the same day.

Donald Trump Jr. declared on Thursday night that coronavirus deaths had dropped to “almost nothing,” questioning the seriousness of the pandemic on a record-breaking day for new cases in which more than 1,000 Americans died of the virus.



graphical user interface: Donald Trump Jr. during an interview on “The Ingraham Angle” on Thursday.


© Twitter/Screen shot via Twitter
Donald Trump Jr. during an interview on “The Ingraham Angle” on Thursday.

Speaking to Fox News host Laura Ingraham, Trump Jr. pointed to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that he suggested show a declining coronavirus death rate.

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“I went through the CDC data, because I kept hearing about new infections, but I was like, ‘Why aren’t they talking about this?’” Trump Jr. said. “Oh, because the number is almost nothing. Because we’ve gotten control of this thing, we understand how it works. They have the therapeutics to be able to deal with this.“

While medical advances and less-crowded hospitals appear to have reduced the death rate from the early days of the pandemic, scientists warn it’s not clear whether that’s a long-term trend, The Washington Post reported. As cases surge across the U.S., fatalities are often a lagging data point for CDC researchers, and reports can be incomplete in capturing the rate in which people are actually dying from the virus and its complications.

Physicians are also fearful that the latest burst in new cases, including a record 89,940 on Thursday, will lead to a greater number of deaths in the coming weeks, according to the New York Times.

“This is still a high death rate, much higher than we see for flu or other respiratory diseases,” Leora Horwitz, director of NYU Langone’s Center for Healthcare Innovation & Delivery Science, told the Times of the current death rate. “I don’t want to pretend this is benign.”

On Thursday night, though, the president’s eldest son pointed to a post from his Instagram account that he argued painted a more clear picture of the present state of a pandemic that has killed at least 228,000 people in the United States.

Gallery: The 4 COVID Symptoms President Trump & the First Lady Reportedly Have (Best Life)

“If you look at my Instagram,” he said, “it’s gone to almost nothing.”

At least 1,063 people in the U.S. died of coronavirus on Thursday, the second-highest daily total for October, and 5,668 have died in the last seven days. This week has also featured two consecutive days of more than 1,000 deaths, marking the second time that’s happened in as many weeks, according to The Washington Post’s coronavirus tracker.

The discussion on Fox was sparked by an earlier segment on CNN, when Sanjay Gupta advised President Trump’s supporters not to attend his rallies. Gupta, the network’s chief medical correspondent, reported that new coronavirus cases had increased 82 percent of the time in counties that hosted a total of 17 rallies for the president between August and September. The infection rate in those counties had also climbed at a faster clip than the overall rate for their state,

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health

Donald Trump Jr. says covid-19 deaths are at ‘almost nothing’ on a day when more than 1,000 Americans died

“I went through the CDC data, because I kept hearing about new infections, but I was like, ‘Why aren’t they talking about this?’” Trump Jr. said. “Oh, because the number is almost nothing. Because we’ve gotten control of this thing, we understand how it works. They have the therapeutics to be able to deal with this.“

While medical advances and less-crowded hospitals appear to have reduced the death rate from the early days of the pandemic, scientists warn it’s not clear whether that’s a long-term trend, The Washington Post reported. As cases surge across the U.S., fatalities are often a lagging data point for CDC researchers, and reports can be incomplete in capturing the rate in which people are actually dying from the virus and its complications.

Physicians are also fearful that the latest burst in new cases, including a record 89,940 on Thursday, will lead to a greater number of deaths in the coming weeks, according to the New York Times.

“This is still a high death rate, much higher than we see for flu or other respiratory diseases,” Leora Horwitz, director of NYU Langone’s Center for Healthcare Innovation & Delivery Science, told the Times of the current death rate. “I don’t want to pretend this is benign.”

On Thursday night, though, the president’s eldest son pointed to a post from his Instagram account that he argued painted a more clear picture of the present state of a pandemic that has killed at least 228,000 people in the United States.

“If you look at my Instagram,” he said, “it’s gone to almost nothing.”

At least 1,063 people in the U.S. died of coronavirus on Thursday, the second-highest daily total for October, and 5,668 have died in the last seven days. This week has also featured two consecutive days of more than 1,000 deaths, marking the second time that’s happened in as many weeks, according to The Washington Post’s coronavirus tracker.

The discussion on Fox was sparked by an earlier segment on CNN, when Sanjay Gupta advised President Trump’s supporters not to attend his rallies. Gupta, the network’s chief medical correspondent, reported that new coronavirus cases had increased 82 percent of the time in counties that hosted a total of 17 rallies for the president between August and September. The infection rate in those counties had also climbed at a faster clip than the overall rate for their state, CNN reported.

Gupta then noted that if anyone had been to one of Trump’s outdoor rallies, which have attracted thousands of maskless supporters not adhering to social distancing, they should assume they have been exposed to the coronavirus and quarantine for 14 days.

“Don’t go to these rallies,” Gupta said. “Look, just about anywhere in the country now, if you go to a gathering that’s several hundred people, it’s without a doubt the virus is attending that rally with you.”

On Fox, Ingraham said that Gupta’s words, along with Minnesota’s covid-19 guidelines capping the number of attendees at the president’s planned

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health

Federal government to pay for coronavirus vaccine for all Americans

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services said it will pay for any Covid-19 vaccine that is authorized or approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to allow for “broad vaccine access and coverage for all Americans.”



a person wearing a mask: WORCESTER, MA - SEPTEMBER 4: Hilda Ramirez receives an injection from RN Bethany Trainor at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, MA on September 04, 2020. Ramirez is taking part in a clinical trial for a COVID-19 vaccine. (Photo by Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)


© Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe/Getty Images
WORCESTER, MA – SEPTEMBER 4: Hilda Ramirez receives an injection from RN Bethany Trainor at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, MA on September 04, 2020. Ramirez is taking part in a clinical trial for a COVID-19 vaccine. (Photo by Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

The agency also announced it will help cover a larger portion of the cost of new Covid-19 treatments that may be coming down the pipeline for Medicare recipients.

“There are several vaccines in Phase 3 trials, production and distribution plans are well underway, and CMS is doing its part by laying the essential groundwork for coverage and payment when a vaccine does arise. It’ll be widely available and accessible to seniors and every American,” CMS administrator Seema Verma said during a briefing Wednesday.

She said that while the federal government is paying for the vaccine, insurers including Medicare, Medicaid and private plans must cover the cost of administering it.

For Medicare recipients, any future vaccine would be covered by Medicare Part B as a preventative vaccine at no cost to beneficiaries. Medicare Part B covers doctor visits and outpatient services such as lab tests, diagnostic screenings and medical equipment.

“The rule removes any existing ambiguity surrounding Medicare’s coverage of the Covid-19 vaccine and allows us to focus on the paramount goal of ensuring that all of Medicare’s 62 million beneficiaries, including those enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan, can receive the vaccine at their provider, their choice, again, at no cost,” said Verma.

She estimated that if “literally every senior got immunized,” it would cost “likely around $2.6 billion — that’s if everybody got vaccinated in the Medicare program.”

The new CMS rule requires most private health insurance plans, including individual health insurance and employer health plans — representing about 200 million Americans, according to Verma — to provide both in-network and out-of-network coverage of the vaccine, at no cost to their members.

The agency said that as a condition of receiving free Covid-19 vaccines from the federal government, providers may not charge people for administration of the vaccine.

“Providers who receive free Covid-19 vaccines from the federal government will be prohibited from charging consumers any additional costs for the administration of the vaccine beyond what their insurance covers. Surprise or balanced billing for vaccine costs is strictly prohibited,” she said.

The 68 million beneficiaries on Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Programs will also be covered for their Covid-19 vaccines during the public health emergency; the Provider Relief Fund will cover the cost for those without insurance coverage.

In addition to covering the cost of a vaccine, the new CMS rule also outlines how Medicare plans to cover the “new generation of Covid-19

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