Aims

dentist

Two Rivers’ Maggie Klinkner aims to be a pediatric dentist

Name: Maggie Klinkner

Parents: Tim and Sam Klinkner

School: Two Rivers High School

Grade: Senior

GPA: 3.67

What extracurricular activities have you been involved with during high school? Throughout high school, I have been involved in student government, Junior Leadership through The Chamber of Manitowoc County, Boomerang, Fact, National Honor Society, Lights Leaders, Advisory Recreational Board, server at St. Peter the Fisherman, figure skating through the Manitowoc County Figure Skating Club, cross country, and track and field.

What is one academic accomplishment about which you feel particularly good? Being able to be involved in so many different things while still keeping up with all my school work. 

Which class or extracurricular activity influenced your decision regarding the career you plan to pursue? My chemistry, physics and advanced chemistry classes. Throughout middle school, science was never a class I really enjoyed, but my views changed when I entered these high school classes. My teacher had a large part in my choice, as she knew how to make the material we learned enjoyable and easy to learn. 

What advice do you have for those just starting their high school career? Don’t take anything for granted; go to that basketball game, go to that musical. High school is only four years long — make the best of it while you are still there. 

What are your plans after high school? I plan to attend Marquette University, where I will major in chemistry. After graduation, I would like to go to dental school and become a pediatric dentist.

What would you like to be doing 10

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medicine

The Sabina Project Aims To Restore BIPOC Sacred Earth Medicine

While psychedelic traditions emerged from a variety of civilizations—including Bwiti, Amazonian, Aztec, Mazatec, Mayan, and Incan cultures—those cultures are rarely recognized today in psychedelic research and medicine, even though psychedelics are going through somewhat of a renaissance. Oregon voters, for instance, just approved Measure 109, which will allow adults 21 and over to use psilocybe cubensis mushrooms in licensed therapy sessions. However, the original cultures that used those psychedelics have been wiped off the map, for the most part.

The Sabina Project aims to change that.

Beginning on November 11 and running through December, The Sabina Project will hold a four-part series of 90-minute sessions covering social justice, European Shamanic tradition, and confronting personal bias.

The Sabina Project is committed to carving out space for Black, Indigenous and people of color (BIPOC) of all backgrounds to integrate psychedelic experiences into their everyday lives.

Published March 1 in Journal of Psychedelic Studies, a report suggests that the mainstream narrative of psychedelic medicine is sorely underrepresented by BIPOC. That’s especially ironic considering where a vast proportion of psychedelic substances came from.

Historically, psychedelic traditions from non-Western cultures were targeted. Harry Anslinger, founding commissioner of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics which eventually became the Drug Enforcement Administration demonized cannabis—itself a mild psychedelic—with an unquestionably racist rhetoric decades ago. Racial disparity exists in modern times in the form of arrest rates for cannabis and psychedelics such as psilocybe cubensis mushrooms. Today psychedelic medicine is on the brink of acceptance into mainstream medicine, but the history was lost.

Charlotte James and Undrea Wright, co-founders of The Sabina Project, answered questions collectively to Forbes about their mission and upcoming four-part series, The Psychedelic Anti-Racism Workshop.

Adams: Do you believe psychedelics can help unlock an individual’s own personal biases?

James and Wright: Absolutely. Psychedelics help peel back the layers of self to reveal our true essence. We are all victims of colonization—both BIPOC and white folx. We all existed in a pre-colonial era in which we lived in indigenous communities that were in the right relationship with the land and each other. Psychedelics help to de-program or decolonize the mind of all the ridiculous stereotypes and expectations that are placed on us. By stripping back these layers we are able to come together to collectively work towards liberation.

Adams: Who was The Sabina Project named after?

James and Wright: María Sabina was a Mazatec curandera who used psyilocybe cubensis or, “The Holy Children” as she called them, in powerful healing ceremonies called veladas. These ceremonies were used as a purification ritual to support individuals and families suffering from ailments. All participants would ingest the mushrooms as a sacrament in order to open portals of the mind and access healing.

Sabina is often credited as “introducing” the Western world to magic mushrooms however, the true history, and consequence,

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health

CHNC Aims to be the Global Leader in Cannabis Clinical Trials Through a Merger with Pharmacology University

HOUSTON, Texas, Oct. 28, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — via NewMediaWire — CHNC announces its merger with Pharmacology University, Inc., a global leader in the field of medical cannabis education that markets its services under the brand Pharmacology University. More to the point, CHNC joining forces with Pharmacology University Inc. and Precision Research Institute has created one of the most complete companies in the cannabis industry. COO Elizabeth Hernandez explains the reasons behind the decision: “While pursuing my dream, I had wanted to unite forces with a company in the Cannabis Industry and that is when I found Pharmacology University. The synergy between the two companies has been superb and we are positioning ourselves to become the high-end authority of the Cannabis Research Industry. Now this journey finally feels complete. Riding this new wave of inspiration, we are deeply committed to produce revenue generating models and building shareholder value.”

The merger of CHNC, which is publicly traded on OTC markets under the ticker symbol CHNC, provides the framework for Pharmacology University to expand its focus into cannabis clinical trials and bolstering its education offerings.

Founded in 2010, Pharmacology University offers educational products and consulting services in the United States, Puerto Rico, Latin and South America; to train doctors, dispensary owners, growers, lawyers, and other professionals on the palliative and myriad health benefits of cannabis. The company also has partnered with private accredited universities to offer an intensive master’s certification program in cannabis science and is now the top international provider of medical cannabis education.

In addition to its classroom education, Pharmacology University owns and operates Canna Law Magazine, which is a digital informational piece that provides cultural enrichment to the cannabis entrepreneur. The magazine has biweekly editions and informs the public about the most recent legal cases in the cannabis industry worldwide, also providing strategies by which its readers can avoid finding themselves in legal situations for lack of knowledge. Canna Law Magazine is currently available in English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian and Arabic, and it is being developed to be published in Chinese and Hindi. To view the magazine, visit www.cannalawmagazine.com.

“We want to be pioneers in the search for the truth with actual clinical trials, in regards to how cannabis can be utilized,” says Pharmacology University In-House Legal Counsel, Anne Graham. “Predominantly because the number one problem for people that are set against using cannabis as medicine is simply due to the fact that the cannabis industry has not produced sufficient medical studies,” she says.

The global market for medical cannabis (also known as medical marijuana), is expected to reach more than $150 billion annually by 2027, according to a 2019 report by ResearchAndMarkets.com. The anticipated growth is driven in large part by the legalization of cannabis for medical use in Europe, as well as the passage in the U.S. of the Hemp Farming Act of 2018, which legalized hemp, a variety of the Cannabis Sativa species that has less than 0.3% concentration of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). And

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fitness

Hylete Aims to Create the Next Big Fitness Brand



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A bright green button on a keyboard that says Equity Crowdfunding. companies to invest in

Hylete is a fitness lifestyle brand, with a wide assortment of apparel items for men and women. The company is also raising capital through an equity crowdfunding campaign on StartEngine. The minimum investment for Hylete is only $500.



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A bright green button on a keyboard that says Equity Crowdfunding. companies to invest in

The co-founders of the company include Ron Wilson and Matthew Paulson, who both had high-level positions at companies like Jaco Clothing and Gathering Storm before starting the company. In 2012, they saw an opportunity to develop a better training short for those who were serious about fitness.

The reception was strong and the co-founders quickly moved into other categories like shirts, pants, hoodies, backpacks and cross-training shoes.

Background on the Company

One of the keys to the success of Hylete is its focus on personalization. This is certainly important for fitness requirements. To this end, the company has created a quiz on its website to determine the best fit for its clothing line. For example, there are 14 distinct styles for shorts.

Hylete has also spent much time cultivating an engaged community (there are over 81,000 followers on Instagram and the company’s products have gotten over 51,000 five-star reviews). Because of this, the company has received valuable feedback to improve its products.

Here are just a few of the company’s offerings:

  • Incline shorts: This uses a stretch woven fabric that has enough room for the hips and thighs, which means higher impact movement.
  • Urban joggers: This item strives for a both warmth and breathability. Some of the features include a drawstring waistband and an internal fleece fabric.
  • Altium sports bra: This has an X-strap for better support and comfort but does not grind into a woman’s shoulders.
  • Circuit II cross-training shoe: These allows you to choose between three types of insoles.
  • Nimbus tights: This is a legging that is meant to complement a person’s hips and legs.

What about the traction for the company? Well, the company has definitely shown strong growth. According to the investor materials, the compound annual growth rate is over 70% and last year’s sales hit $12.6 million. There are more than 300,000 customers and over 30,000 are certified fitness experts, who have provided content on the Hylete blog and social channels.

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Bottom Line On Hylete

The equity crowdfunding capital raise has gone quite well. So far, the company has received commitments for more than $734,000 from 974 investors (the valuation has been set at $44.8 million). Yes, it seems that the company’s own community has been essential for this success.

The investment also comes with several perks. That is, there is 50% off all regular-priced products and 10% discounts on clearance locker items. Then there is also free ground shipping for U.S. orders and one Hylete rewards point for each dollar invested.

But of course, as is the

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health

New Bill Aims to End Racial Disparities in Amputations

On Friday, Congressman Donald M. Payne Jr., a Democrat from New Jersey, introduced a sweeping bill to reduce unnecessary amputations and address racial disparities that were the subject of a ProPublica story investigating why Black Americans were three times more likely to undergo diabetic amputations than others. The Amputation Reduction and Compassion Act of 2020 was introduced five months after the ProPublica investigation showed how government and hospital policies obstruct equitable care for at-risk patients.

The bill proposes major reforms that seek to address policy gaps explored in the article. Today, about half of patients with peripheral artery disease — a condition in which clogged arteries limit the flow of blood — are asymptomatic, and primary care physicians are not always reimbursed for screening. But catching and treating the disease, which is often caused by diabetes, is critical to preventing unnecessary amputations. The bill seeks to ensure that all at-risk patients can obtain a screening at no cost. It requires that Medicare and Medicaid cover the tests, as well as private insurers.

The ProPublica article also focused on how patients often undergo diabetic amputations without arterial testing beforehand. That testing, either with duplex scans or angiography, can show where blood flow is blocked and can indicate whether an intervention can restore blood flow before surgeons resort to amputation. But nationwide, more than 30% of patients don’t get arterial testing before amputation. One doctor likened this to removing a woman’s breast after she felt a lump, without first ordering a mammogram. The bill proposes that Medicare only pay for an amputation caused by vascular disease or diabetes if the patient has received arterial testing within three months of the surgery.

“The greatest problem with peripheral artery disease is that it can go undetected for years and lead to limb amputations that could be avoided with early detection,” said Congressman Payne, who launched the bi-partisan Congressional Peripheral Artery Disease Caucus with Congressman Gus Bilirakis, a Republican from Florida, in 2019. Payne said the bill provides resources to screen-at risk patients and educate doctors, which in turn will reduce racial disparities in amputations. Five co-sponsors, all Democrats, have signed onto the bill, including Congressman Bobby Rush, from Illinois, Congressman Ruben Gallego, from Arizona, Congressman Bennie Thompson, from Mississippi, Congresswoman Eddie Bernice Johnson, from Texas, and Congresswoman Lisa Blunt Rochester, from Delaware.

Rush and Gallego joined the effort after reading the ProPublica article on the work of Dr. Fakorede, a cardiologist who is reducing amputation rates in Mississippi and advocating nationally for safeguards for patients. “I was shocked and disturbed by the investigative article published earlier this year in ProPublica,” Rush said by email. “The article succinctly highlighted the financial incentives to amputate diabetic patients’ limbs rather than invest earlier in preventive screenings, particularly for poor Black and Brown patients who are disproportionately and discriminatorily overlooked until it is too late.”

After reading the ProPublica article, Gallego was also galvanized to craft legislation to reduce unnecessary amputations. His office reached out to medical experts,

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