age

dentist

Dentist warns people who shave teeth down to pegs ‘will need dentures by age 40’

A dentist has warned people having their teeth shaved down in the hope of achieving the perfect smile are “ruining their teeth for the rest of their lives”.

Dr Manouchehri, a dentist from London, shared viral video of a teen who says she visited Turkey to have her teeth shaved down for veneers – only for the expert to point out she hadn’t been given veneers at all.

The dentist corrected her by stating what she had got instead was full coverage crowns, and not veneers which are mouldings bonded to the front surface of a tooth.

She then got into the alarming list of negative long-term effects of having full coverage crowns fitted, made popular by many social media influencers.

The video has had more than seven million views on TikTok

Dr Manouchehri explains: “If you’ve seen my previous video, you know shaving teeth down to pegs like that is going to damage the nerve, and you’re going to need a root canal treatment and an extraction at some point in your life.

“Second point; veneers or crowns will need to be replaced every 10 to 15 years typically. Now, she is a gorgeous young woman, I thinks she’s what, around 18 or 19 maximum, and she is going to need to replace them probably four or five times throughout her lifetime, if not more.

“Not only the financial burden is going to be an issue, secondly it’s going to be a biological burden because the tooth physically can’t be prepared and re-prepared every single time.

Thousands of viewers thanked Dr Manouchehri for sharing the advice

“So she’s a gorgeous young lady and she’s ruined her teeth, possibly for the rest of her life and she’s going to have dentures by the age of 40.

“I personally wouldn’t choose that, would you?”

The response video has been viewed more than seven million times on TikTok, and many people left comments to say her advice had convinced them not to go through with the procedure.

One replied to say: “Um thank you I literally almost booked my appointment for next week, thank you for saving me.”

A second person said: “I can confirm. I have ONE I had done at 25. Now have to have it replaced at 25. And have a root canal.”

Another added: “It’s actually heartbreaking to see so many young people feel the need to go to these extremes in the name of beauty. Very sad.”

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fitness

How Military Members Should Deal With Fitness and Health as They Age

Your military service may be the fittest time of your life, but it’s no secret that after years in a physically demanding job, the aches and pains of athletic life before the military and injuries during the military can start to add up. For some, those aches and pains may hit in the late 20s and early 30s. Others might not experience the typical pains of a life well lived until their 40s and 50s.

No matter when the wear and tear of military service catches up with you, there are countless ways to turn this process around. The common denominator is: don’t stop moving.

Several veterans ranging in VA disability ratings from 50 to 100% I spoke with recently said staying active and working hard to not gain weight are both key to reducing the effect of old injuries. How we got to this point follows a somewhat standard path – and now what it looks like might help you mitigate it for yourself.

Teen Years. Many worked hard to gain weight, put on muscle for sports, and could not eat enough food to gain weight. Many athletes or fitness buffs in their teens learn how to eat to gain weight, while others work to drop it quickly for sports like wrestling. Depending on where you were on that spectrum, you likely took those good and bad eating habits into your 20 to 30s.

Late Teens and Early 20s. As we finished growing, many learned that they were no longer a “hard gainer” and could put on both muscle and fat with relative ease. Many put on weight without even trying. And while some were able to outwork their diets, for many that subtle gain of five pounds a year turned into 50 lbs. overweight by the end of the decade. Meanwhile, depending on military job, aches and pains from running, rucking, equipment carry and other high repetition exercises started to show themselves.

Twenties into 30s. Now we’re at the decade where many started to experience job related injuries and surgeries layered on the stresses of the job, life, family and deployments. Add in combat deployments and traumatic injuries and you have an entirely new level of recovery to deal with when you come back home. That is also when the previous injuries from early life athletics, job related tasks and injuries or stress, combined with eating habits of previous decades, add to the loss of the ability to recover quickly from training, injuries and illnesses. Outworking a bad diet suddenly was near impossible.

Thirties into 40s — Many have either made the decision to leave the military by now or decided to put in 20-plus years. Regardless of your decision to continue serving or not, you cannot escape the age and athletic history. Learning new skills and following new rules at this point is absolutely required to live normally. Some of these new rules are:

  • You cannot outwork your diet. You need to eat better and usually
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health

Staying Active as You Age Not a Guarantee Against Dementia | Health News

By Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Experts in healthy aging often cite the importance of leisure activities — hanging out with friends, playing games, taking classes — in maintaining your brain health as you grow older.

But a new study calls into question whether those enjoyable pursuits actually protect you against dementia.

Researchers found no link between middle-aged folks taking part in leisure activities and their risk of dementia over the next two decades, according to findings published online Oct. 28 in the journal Neurology.

However, they did discover that some people later diagnosed with dementia will stop participating in leisure activities years before they are diagnosed.

“We found a link between low level of activity in late life and dementia risk, but that this is probably due to people giving up activities as they are beginning to develop dementia,” said lead researcher Andrew Sommerlad, a principal research fellow in psychology at University College London. “Dementia appeared to be the cause, rather than consequence, of low levels of leisure activities.”

These results appear to run counter to the “use it or lose it” theory of brain health, in which numerous prior studies have linked continued engagement in social activities, mental stimulation and physical exercise to a lower risk of dementia.

“Previous studies have tended to look at leisure activities in late life and find an association, but because dementia develops slowly over many years, these studies may not be able to identify the true nature of the relationship,” he said.

Sommerlad said that other factors more directly related to physical health might wind up being more important to protecting the aging brain.

“We do not question the wider benefits of taking part in leisure activities, for promoting enjoyment, quality of life, and general physical and mental health, but other measures have better evidence specifically for dementia prevention,” Sommerlad said. “These are treating health problems like diabetes and hypertension, reducing smoking and alcohol intake, physical activity, treating hearing problems, and having social contact with others.”

For the new study, Sommerlad and his colleagues analyzed data gathered as part of a long-term health study of London-based civil servants that began in 1985.

The researchers looked at data from 8,280 people (average age 56) whose health was tracked for an average of 18 years. Their participation in leisure activities was assessed at the study’s start, five years later and again 10 years later.

Leisure activities included reading, listening to music, using a home computer for fun, taking evening classes, participating in clubs, attending live events or movies, gardening, and playing card or board games. Do-it-yourself home improvements, artistic endeavors, religious activities, going down to the pub, and visiting friends and relatives were also examined.

The researchers found no relationship between a person’s participation in more leisure activities at the start of the study and their dementia risk nearly 20 years later.

They only found a relationship when leisure activities in late life were assessed.

People

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health

Medical task force recommends lowering suggested age for colorectal screenings

The Task Force announced Tuesday morning their proposal to lower the suggested age for when to start colorectal screenings, moving it up five years, from 50, to 45 years old. The move may indicate a growing call for awareness and accelerate action amongst an age group that may not know they’re at risk.

“The prognosis is so much better if you catch it at an earlier stage,” Dr. Kimmie Ng, the director of the Young-Onset Colorectal Cancer Center at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, told ABC News. “These new guidelines are hugely significant. They support and validate the alarming epidemiologic trends we’ve been seeing: This cancer is rising at about a rate of 2% per year, in people under the age of 50, since the 1990s.”

Colorectal cancer impacts the gastrointestinal system’s final segment. While lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S., colorectal cancer comes second, according to the latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — and yet, it remains one of the most treatable, even curable cancers, when caught in its early stages.

“Way too young” were the words resounding across the globe late this summer, when news broke that actor Chadwick Boseman, at just 43 years old, had died of colon cancer. Boseman had kept his long, difficult battle mostly private, but the shock of his loss was compounded by a common misconception: that the disease only strikes older people.

Even though overall incidence and mortality rates for colorectal cancer have decreased over the past few decades, colorectal cancer deaths among younger adults continue to climb. It’s a concerning trend, experts told ABC News, pointing out the importance of testing and early intervention.

PHOTO: A doctor speaks with a patient in this stock photo.

In 2018, the American Cancer Society updated their guidelines, recommending that those at average risk of colorectal cancer begin regular screening at age 45. Experts hope the Task Force’s update shines a light on the importance of the issue.

For years prior, screening was not generally recommended for the below-50 crowd. This led to potentially vulnerable, or even sick adults putting off testing thinking their symptoms did not rise to the level of firm diagnosis. Because of this lack of awareness, pernicious, possibly cancerous growths remained undetected for too long, experts say, and now, young patients are suffering from more advanced, harder to treat cancers.

“Cancer is simply not on their radar,” Ng said, speaking more specifically about colon cancer. “They’re otherwise young and healthy. So we need to emphasize that yes, this can happen in young people.”

Nearly 25% of screening-eligible Americans have never been screened for colon cancer, and yet, it is expected to cause over 53,000 American deaths this year alone. Of the roughly 148,000 individuals who will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer in 2020, about 18,000 of

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health

Colorectal cancer screening should start at age 45, not 50, federal task force says

The draft recommendation statement, which was released Tuesday and is now open for public comment, marks a departure from its last update to the guidelines about five years ago. (Task force recommendations are typically revisited every five years.) The panel previously concluded that data on lowering the starting age was mixed and that beginning screenings before 50 would provide only a “modest” benefit. Its position stood in contrast with the American Cancer Society’s, which updated its recommendation in 2018 to say regular screenings should start at age 45.

Now, though, Barry said a review of more recent epidemiological studies on the risk of colorectal cancer increasing in younger people, coupled with simulation modeling, which suggests additional deaths could be prevented if screenings were to start at 45, led the task force to the same conclusion as the cancer society. The draft statement will be available for public comment until Nov. 23, with final recommendations expected to be released “within a few months,” Barry said.

Outside experts say the consensus among the leading organizations could have broad implications on access to care.

“These guidelines, if finalized, eventually will change standard of care for preventive medicine and how we recommend cancer screenings for average-risk Americans,” said Kimmie Ng, director of the Young-Onset Colorectal Cancer Center at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston.

Many insurance companies, for instance, often base their coverage on recommendations from the task force, which evaluates screening tests, counseling services and preventive medications, Ng said. As it stands, the draft statement makes regular colorectal cancer screenings for people ages 45 to 75 a service that most private insurance plans are required by law to cover with no co-pay for patients, according to the task force.

“I think the result of all of this will be that life will be saved,” Ng said.

Robert Smith, senior vice president of cancer screening for the American Cancer Society, called the proposed update a “welcome change.” Although the existing guidelines from the cancer society and the task force are “both highly respected” and used frequently by health-care providers, Smith said he hopes “removing that barrier” of insurance coverage will increase the number of referrals for people in the 45-to-49 age group.

“It may very well be that a physician, who has been shown to be sensitive to the costs of care, would choose not to recommend getting screening at age 45, because they’re concerned that the patient would get a bill that they couldn’t afford to pay,” Smith said. “We’re already seeing screening rates go up in adults at age 45, but they’ll go up a lot more now.”

“It’s been shown that in the African American community, they have higher incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer, and there’s been the question whether this is due to biology or access to care,” said Robin Mendelsohn, co-director of the Center for Young Onset Colorectal Cancer at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. “More and more, we believe that it’s likely access to

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health

Poverty Might Raise Black Kids’ Health Risks as Early as Age 5 | Health News

By Steven Reinberg, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Kids growing up in poverty show the effects of being poor as early as age 5 — especially those who are Black, a new study suggests.

The research adds to mounting evidence that children of Black parents who are also poor face greater health inequities than whites.

“Our findings underscore the pronounced racialized disparities for young children,” said lead author Dr. Neal Halfon, director of the Center for Healthier Children, Families and Communities at the University of California, Los Angeles.

For the study, teachers administered a standardized test to measure physical, social, emotional and language development of kindergarteners in 98 school districts across the United States. More than 185,000 kids took the test from 2010 to 2017.

Analyzing the data, the researchers found that 30% of the poorest children were vulnerable in one or more areas of health development, compared with 17% of children from wealthier areas.

These differences in vulnerability varied among from different ethnic and racial groups. Black children were at the highest risk, followed by Hispanic children. Asian children were at the lowest risk.

The difference between Black children and white children was most striking at the higher socioeconomic levels and tended to narrow for kids from lower-income areas.

The disparities can have a profound effect on kids’ long-term development and lead to higher rates diabetes, heart disease, drug use, mental health disorders and dementia, the researchers said.

“Many other studies have highlighted patterns of income and racial inequality in health and educational outcomes. What this study shows is that these patterns of inequality are clearly evident and measurable before kids start school,” Halfon said in a university news release.

The findings were published in the October issue of the journal Health Affairs.

Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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dentist

Dentist reveals how much toothpaste you should be using depending on age

16 October 2020, 15:40

Dr Gao has revealed the amount of toothpaste we should be using
Dr Gao has revealed the amount of toothpaste we should be using.

Picture:
TikTok


A dentist has gone viral on TikTok after revealing the amount of toothpaste people should really be using.

It turns out we may have all been brushing our teeth wrong, because one dentist has claimed that people generally use significantly more toothpaste than needed.

Read more: Netflix trialling new feature that lets you stop ‘are you still watching’ interruptions

Dr Gao took to TikTok to make the shocking revelation, and revealed how much toothpaste we should be using according to our age.

Dr Gao revealed that the toothpaste amounts used in adverts is generally too much
Dr Gao revealed that the toothpaste amounts used in adverts is generally too much.

Picture:
TikTok


In his video, which has racked up millions of views, he said that the amount of toothpaste generally used in adverts is too much, and that a pea sized amount is plenty for adults.

He said: “The amount used in commercials is way too much. 

Read more: One in three people admit to only washing their bed sheets once a year, new survey reveals

He revealed that a pea sized amount is plenty for adults
He revealed that a pea sized amount is plenty for adults.

Picture:
TikTok


“For ages three and below, all a smear is all you need.”

Dr Gao then put a small amount of toothpaste on a brush, saying: “For anyone older, a pea size amount is plenty.”

He then explained why you shouldn’t put too much toothpaste on your brush, adding: “Trust me it doesn’t make your teeth any cleaner.”

He revealed that children only need a smear of toothpaste
He revealed that children only need a smear of toothpaste.

Picture:
TikTok


Dr Gao added that doing so can lead to dental problems, particularly for children.

In a separate video, he said: “Not only is it a waste for children whose adult teeth are still developing, swallowing too much toothpaste that contains fluoride can cause dental fluorosis. 

“Dental fluorosis is a cosmetic condition that causes a change in the appearance in the tooth and enamel.

“The appearance can range from brown and light discoloration, to brown strains and even obvious pits.”

Many viewers rushed to comment their shock, with one writing: “Thinking of all the toothpaste I’ve wasted.”

Another added: “That’s why electric brushes can only hold pea size toothpaste.”

British Dental Association’s scientific adviser Professor Damien Walmsley told Heart.co.uk: “The correct amount of toothpaste for most people to use is a pea size.”

He also added: “Brush at least twice daily, with a fluoridated toothpaste, brush last thing at night and at least on one other occasion

“Use fluoridated toothpaste (1,350 – 1,500 ppm fluoride).

“Spit out after brushing and do not rinse, to maintain fluoride concentration levels.”

For kids under three, he recommends: “For children aged up to 3 years, use only a smear of toothpaste.

“Use fluoridated toothpaste containing no less than 1,000 ppm fluoride.

And for children aged between three and even, he says: “Use fluoridated toothpaste containing more than 1,000 ppm fluoride, use a pea size amount.

“Children’s tooth brushing should be supervised until at

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