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medicine

Medicine Hat area Schools adapt for Remembrance ceremonies

Remembrance Day ceremonies are going to look different at schools this year.

Due to COVID-19 protocols, large gatherings of students and staff can no longer happen. This means that a school-wide Remembrance assembly is not possible.

The Catholic Board of Education and Public School Division worked with CFB Suffield to create videos to show students and staff before Nov. 11. Prairie Rose schools will also be showing videos from CFB Suffield.

The public board will play its Remembrance videos on different days at different schools, while the Catholic board will show them today.

“Since we can’t be together in a normal way, we made these videos to keep the tradition of Remembrance Day going,” said MHCBE communications co-ordinator Derrian Hallas.

The public school board will have Nov. 11, 12 and 13 off next week. This was voted on recently by the board and is meant to give a bit of a break partway through the first half of the school year. Prairie Rose has the same days off as the public system.

MHPSD initially had a PD Day booked for Nov. 20, but moved that ahead and added a non-operational day to give the extended weekend.

The Catholic board voted months ago to give the entire week off. This was also voted on to give everyone a break during a stressful time.

Both boards thanked CFB Suffield for the help this year with helping make Remembrance Day happen at local schools.

The Catholic board will be posted Remembrance videos on its social media pages.

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fitness

DC gyms and fitness studios adapt, hope for mild weather or close for good as winter nears

D.C. gyms and fitness studios have been faced with a daunting realization: winter is coming. See how they are making changes, building workout pods, opening new facilities and also closing for good due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Students joined Betsy Poos of Realignment Studio on Capitol Hill for one of the last yoga classes before the studio closes at the end of October. (WTOP/Dan Friedell)

WTOP/Dan Friedell

Marcus Lowe leads a class at Cut Seven’s new location off 14th Street NW. (WTOP/Dan Friedell)

WTOP/Dan Friedell

Election Studio, on H Street NE., has built individual workout pods hoping that students will come back to spinning classes this winter. (WTOP/Dan Friedell)

Courtesy Candice Geller

Reggie Smith, the co-owner of BOOMBOX, has been leading classes on the roof of Union Market during the pandemic. (WTOP/Dan Friedell)

Courtesy Reggie Smith

Chris and Alex Perrin, who own Cut Seven, leased and renovated a new space so they could run a hybrid indoor/outdoor class out of an old auto garage. (WTOP/Dan Friedell)

WTOP/Dan Friedell

Betsy Poos will continue leading online classes during the winter, as will her studio’s teachers, even though Realignment Studio will close at the end of October. (WTOP/Dan Friedell)

WTOP/Dan Friedell

David Guisao leads a BOOMBOX class on the roof of Union Market. Reggie Smith said he hopes people are willing to come back and exercise indoors when it gets cold outside. (WTOP/Dan Friedell)

Courtesy Reggie Smith

When the coronavirus pandemic swept across North America in March, it closed schools, businesses, restaurants and fitness centers, forcing many people to work from home and limit their mixing in society.

There was one silver lining: the weather, while brisk and blustery some of the time, was generally good, and getting better. It made exercising outside tolerable, and even appealing most days.

While many people continued their fitness programs over the last seven months with Zoom classes or dripping sweat on a treadmill or Peloton bike indoors, many moved outside.

Lured by good weather in the spring and fall, some people even survived the sultriest days by working out early in the morning or late in the evening.

But now, winter is coming.

What will fitness studios and gyms, many of which have moved workouts outside, do at the end of October as days get shorter and frigid mornings make it harder for clients to peel back the blankets and get out of bed?

For the owners of four D.C. independent fitness studios, there are four distinct choices: invest in a new studio that supports a hybrid indoor/outdoor workout; encourage athletes to come back indoors while working out in masks and maintaining their distance; build individual workout “pods” separated by a frame and plastic sheeting; or, sadly, decide to shut down for good.

For Chris and Alex Perrin, the husband and wife team who own Cut Seven, a facility that offers an intense, boot-camp style workout in Logan Circle, the pandemic put on hold expansion plans, moved classes outside onto a D.C. school’s soccer field, and

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