Day: November 10, 2020

medicine

Pro Active Physical Therapy & Sports Medicine Opens a New Clinic in Brighton

CARLSBAD, Calif., Nov. 10, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Physical Rehabilitation Network (PRN) of Carlsbad, Calif., a leading physical therapy provider and practice management organization, today announced the grand opening of its affiliated Pro Active Physical Therapy & Sports Medicine (Pro Active) clinic in Brighton, Colo., located at 1321 South. 4th Ave. The Pro Active Brighton clinic elevates the brand’s presence in the state to 13.

Pro Active’s new outpatient clinic will support all ages and is proud to offer the Brighton community and surrounding areas a full range of pain management and injury prevention services including: physical therapy, functional integrative therapy, work injury rehabilitation, blood flow restriction therapy and sports medicine for a combined approach to pain resolution and injury recovery.

“The opening of our Brighton clinic is another critical step toward our commitment to expand access to quality physical therapy care across the state of Colorado,” said Ajay Gupta, CEO, PRN. Led by Kate Farner, we have assembled an extremely talented, experienced and passionate team at the Brighton location, who are proud to not only offer high-quality care but provide a safe and rewarding experience for patients seeking care.”

Clinic partner, [Kate] Farner, PT, DPT, ATC, will oversee the new Brighton location. A native of the California desert, Farner moved to northern Colorado in 2003 after receiving her Bachelor of Science degree in Exercise Science (Athletic Training) from the University of Northern Colorado in 2006. Farner also has a Doctorate of Physical Therapy from Regis University.

Farner is a Licensed Physical Therapist and Certified Athletic Trainer specializing in the treatment of orthopedic injuries, sports injuries, cumulative trauma disorders, occupational injuries, concussions and vestibular disorders. Farner is also full body certified in both Active Release Techniques, Trigger Point Dry Needling and is a Certified Vestibular Rehabilitation Specialist. 

“I’m very excited for this opportunity to lead the PT programs at the Brighton clinic,” said Farner, Clinic Partner & Director. “By expanding care to the Brighton community, we close a significant gap between those needing quality pain management support and the resources available to them. If you are in need of physical therapy care, no doctor or healthcare practitioner referral is needed, so come visit our Brighton clinic today and you’ll see why our patients love coming to us.”

Pro Active accepts most insurance plans and will work with patients to help them better understand benefits and what services will be covered by insurance. To learn more about Pro Active, please visit proactivecolorado.com.

For more information on PRN locations or partnership opportunities, visit PRNpt.com. You can also follow us @PRNPhysicalTherapy on Facebook, @PRN_therapy on Twitter or on LinkedIn. 

COVID-19 Safety Statement

With safety as a top priority, Pro Active is actively taking the necessary steps to ensure patient care is completed with strict infection control measures. Pro Active will continue to act with an abundance of caution in alignment with recommendations from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) the Occupational Safety

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medicine

COVID-19 vaccine: Penn Medicine researcher Dr. Drew Weissman laid groundwork for Pfizer, Moderna vaccines

PHILADELPHIA (WPVI) — A local researcher from Penn Medicine says there’s reason to believe at least one other potential coronavirus vaccine could be as effective as Pfizer’s vaccine is said to be.

“That’s the highest number I have seen for a respiratory vaccine in humans,” said Dr. Drew Weissman from the University of Pennsylvania.

He is pleasantly surprised with Pfizer’s reported 90% efficacy with its experimental coronavirus vaccine. After all, he helped develop the technology for the vaccine.

It’s called messenger RNA or mRNA.

“What’s different about mRNA is it’s a genetic vaccine,” he said.

Other vaccines, such as the flu shot, use live or inactivated virus to create an immune response, but mRNA tricks the body into mounting it’s own defense.

The vaccine made by Moderna is similar and also uses mRNA. Because of that, Dr. Weissman expects similar efficacy.

What’s still unknown is how long immunity from the vaccine would last.

“What we do know is in our animal studies, the antibody responses last a long time. We’ve gone years and antibody response hasn’t dropped in monkeys, so I have high hopes durability will be very good,” he said.

He also hopes enough people choose to get vaccinated to make a difference.

“If they do, the pandemic will be over in a year or so, if they don’t know what’s going to happen,” he said.

Dr. Weissman says when the choice is getting a safe vaccine or getting sick with COVID-19 or passing it on, the decision should be clear.

Dr. Weissman was also a fellow at Dr. Anthony Fauci’s lab years ago.

Copyright © 2020 WPVI-TV. All Rights Reserved.

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fitness

Kids’ physical fitness is more important than BMI — ScienceDaily

For adults, the goal of exercise is often to shed some pounds, but new research from the University of Georgia suggests the objective should be different for kids.

Physical education should focus on improving students’ physical skills, knowledge of the benefits of exercise and motivation to be active. The goal should be to build students’ cardiorespiratory endurance, a measure of how well the body handles long periods of exercise — not to help them lose weight, according to the study’s authors. Kids can be overweight (as measured by the Body Mass Index, or BMI) and still able to reach the recommended 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity each day. And students who are more active during PE, despite their weight, are more likely to stay active after school as well.

“Research has shown that even in young children, people who are fitter in terms of cardiorespiratory endurance participate in more intense physical activities,” said lead author Sami Yli-Piipari, an associate professor in UGA’s Mary Frances Early College of Education. “It’s not really your weight that matters. Children can be a little bit overweight but still be relatively fit.”

The study followed 450 children, ages 10 through 12, who took 90 minutes of mandatory PE every week. The students wore an accelerometer on their right hip during the day to track their total physical activity for a week, and simple tests — such as being able to do a regular or modified pushup or crunch — were used to determine their mastery of physical skills. The researchers also explored whether students enjoyed PE or participated out of obligation.

“Physical education matters,” Yli-Piipari said. “It’s not only where students learn the skills, abilities and motivation to be active; it’s where students are having to do something active at a higher intensity than they probably would after school.”

The study took place in Finland, where children have more PE on average than American students, and the class also focuses on the importance of exercise and how to incorporate it into everyday life. In keeping with previous research, boys tended to be more active than girls. But surprisingly, muscle strength and motor skills didn’t play a role in activity levels. Neither did motivation — whether the child wanted to participate in PE — nor enjoyment of PE classes.

The students who didn’t participate in after-school sports were also typically less active during their down time. For many of these students, PE was the only time they exercised hard enough to work up a sweat, which makes it even more important to use class time effectively in a way that will get students moving and motivated to keep it up.

To help children learn to be physically literate, Yli-Piipari suggests teaching them in a way that gets students up and active.

  • Don’t just lecture and tell kids to do something. Take them to places, get them moving, and let them try different things themselves.
  • Variety is key. Introduce children to multiple ways they
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fitness

Best fitness gifts for 2020

This story is part of Holiday Gift Guide 2020, CNET’s gift picks with expert advice, reviews and recommendations for the latest tech gifts for you and your family.

2020 has brought plenty of great products to help manage stress, stay active and even keep tabs on our heart health — right on time for those of us whose health and fitness goals went out the window this year.

No matter what health and fitness goals the person you’re shopping for may have, there’s a thoughtful gift out there to support them.

You can help your friends and family get on track again with the fitness gift ideas below, whether you’re shopping for your super sporty sister or your friend who’d usually rather stay on the couch.

ClassPass

ClassPass is a fitness app that gives you access to millions of fitness classes in more than 2,500 cities worldwide. Members can sign up for a monthly workout subscription, but you can also give someone a ClassPass gift card that they can use at any time, making it one of the best fitness gifts you can give someone whether the recipient is a fitness fanatic or someone looking to start a fitness routine. 

Given that many gyms and fitness studios are still closed, you can take on-demand or live-streamed workout classes and pay as you go for each class. Many studios are also offering outdoor classes, to help reduce the risk of contracting the coronavirus.

The idea of ClassPass is actually really smart because it lets anyone try out a huge variety of fitness classes and experiences without making a commitment to one specific gym or workout studio. It’s the perfect workout gift for anyone who wants to try yoga, dumbbells, strength training, resistance bands, acrobatics, boxing, dance and way more before dedicating themselves to a program.

Read more: Best streaming workout subscriptions

Hydroflask

The Hydro Flask scored the top spot in our list of best water bottles, and for good reason. They’re durable, colorful and the insulated design keeps hot liquids hot and cool liquids cool for hours. These water bottles come in many sizes and colors to suit anyone’s style and needs.

I can attest that the insulation in the bottle and flat cap really works. I put ice water in my Hydro Flask and then left it in a car in 105-degree Arizona heat for four hours. When I got back, it was just as cold as when I put it in, ice cubes and all. 

Each bottle comes with an insulated flat screw-off cap, but depending on what model you buy, you can also opt for a sport cap, flip cap or straw lid.

Read more: The best water bottles in 2020

Five S

Since spas have been closed most of the year, at least where I live, I haven’t been able to get a massage to get rid of the persistent knots in my neck. That means I’ve been relying

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medicine

Representation of female authors in family medicine academic journals is trending upward

Representation of Female Authors in Family Medicine Academic Journals is Trending Upward

After decades of underrepresentation in medicine, women are now entering many specialties in the United States, including family medicine, at higher rates than men. Despite the rising proportion of female physicians in family medicine, they continue to be underrepresented in the highest levels of professional attainment, particularly in academic settings. This study from the Robert Graham Center examines female authorship of research published in three leading U.S. family medicine journals over time. They found a statistically significant increase in female authorship of published research over time, with a 13-point jump in original research with female senior authors, from 29 percent in 2008 to 42 percent by 2017. In that same time period, the gender composition of the journals’ editorial boards remained roughly the same. Published research was more likely to be male led if it did not have grant funding or if there were no other co-authors. This study’s authors discuss the importance of increasing female representation in peer-reviewed publications, closing the gender gaps in the highest levels of academic medicine, and ensuring appropriate representation of thoughts and ideas in the field of family medicine.

Has Female Authorship Distribution in Family Medicine Research Evolved Over Time?

Yalda Jabbarpour, MD, et al

Robert Graham Center, Washington, D.C.

https://www.annfammed.org/content/18/6/496

###

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.

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fitness

New study shows kids’ physical fitness is more important than BMI

Weight loss shouldn't be the goal of PE
Children get active outside UGA’s McPhaul Child Development Lab. Credit: Andrew Davis Tucker/UGA

For adults, the goal of exercise is often to shed some pounds, but new research from the University of Georgia suggests the objective should be different for kids.

Physical education should focus on improving students’ physical skills, knowledge of the benefits of exercise and motivation to be active. The goal should be to build students’ cardiorespiratory endurance, a measure of how well the body handles long periods of exercise—not to help them lose weight, according to the study’s authors. Kids can be overweight (as measured by the Body Mass Index, or BMI) and still able to reach the recommended 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity each day. And students who are more active during PE, despite their weight, are more likely to stay active after school as well.

“Research has shown that even in young children, people who are fitter in terms of cardiorespiratory endurance participate in more intense physical activities,” said lead author Sami Yli-Piipari, an associate professor in UGA’s Mary Frances Early College of Education. “It’s not really your weight that matters. Children can be a little bit overweight but still be relatively fit.”

The study followed 450 children, ages 10 through 12, who took 90 minutes of mandatory PE every week. The students wore an accelerometer on their right hip during the day to track their total physical activity for a week, and simple tests—such as being able to do a regular or modified pushup or crunch— were used to determine their mastery of physical skills. The researchers also explored whether students enjoyed PE or participated out of obligation.

New study shows kids’ physical fitness is more important than BMI
Physical activity during PE in school is a good indicator of students’ activity after school, according to new research. Credit: Dorothy Kozlowski/UGA

“Physical education matters,” Yli-Piipari said. “It’s not only where students learn the skills, abilities and motivation to be active; it’s where students are having to do something active at a higher intensity than they probably would after school.”

The study took place in Finland, where children have more PE on average than American students, and the class also focuses on the importance of exercise and how to incorporate it into everyday life. In keeping with previous research, boys tended to be more active than girls. But surprisingly, muscle strength and motor skills didn’t play a role in activity levels. Neither did motivation—whether the child wanted to participate in PE—nor enjoyment of PE classes.

The students who didn’t participate in after-school sports were also typically less active during their down time. For many of these students, PE was the only time they exercised hard enough to work up a sweat, which makes it even more important to use class time effectively in a way that will get students moving and motivated to keep it up.

To help children learn to be physically literate, Yli-Piipari suggests teaching them in a way that gets students up and active.

  • Don’t just lecture and tell kids
Read More
medicine

American College of Lifestyle Medicine Launches Bill of Rights to Raise Awareness of Lifestyle Medicine’s Role in Type 2 Diabetes Informed Consent and Treatment

The Bill of Rights is a companion to ACLM’s recently launched “Reversing Type 2 Diabetes and Insulin Resistance with Lifestyle Medicine” 18-hour, 20-module, evidence-based CME/CE accredited online course for physicians and health professionals. This is the first comprehensive educational curriculum offered to equip physicians and other health professionals to treat and reverse type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance.  In addition, ACLM recently published a position paper, “Type 2 Diabetes Remission and Lifestyle Medicine: A Position Statement from the American College of Lifestyle Medicine.” ACLM will also present a free webinar, “The Reversibility of Type 2 Diabetes with Lifestyle Medicine—Q & A” on Thursday, Nov. 12 at 12 p.m. CST.

ACLM defines Lifestyle Medicine as the use of an evidence-based, whole food, plant-predominant dietary lifestyle, regular physical activity, restorative sleep, stress management, avoidance of risky substances and positive social connection as a primary therapeutic modality for treatment, reversal and prevention of chronic disease. Addressing lifestyle is the first step in type 2 diabetes and other chronic disease treatment and management guidelines, but it has been overlooked due to a lack of physician training in lifestyle, barriers to practice and a lack of consumer understanding. 

“We believe that a patient does not give fully informed consent if this option is not presented to them at the time of diagnosis,” said ACLM Founding President John Kelly, MD, DipABLM, lead faculty for the new course. “COVID-19 has highlighted the vulnerabilities created by type 2 diabetes, amplifying the urgent need to restore health to those impacted by this lifestyle-related chronic disease, as opposed to simply managing it.”

“COVID-19 has exposed the long-standing issue of racial health disparities in America, as people of color have been disproportionally affected by the pandemic,” said ACLM President Cate Collings, MD, DipABLM.  “While the causes of racial health disparities are many, and include the range of social determinants of health, the most devastating impact is from the significantly higher incidence of chronic disease, most notably type 2 diabetes.

“If you are talking about racial health disparities and are not focused on the disparate impact of type 2 diabetes, you are missing the heart of the matter.”

“Truly addressing racial health disparities will only happen when our nation recognizes the role of lifestyle and trains its clinicians accordingly, fully informs patients, removes the barriers to practicing Lifestyle Medicine and rewards physicians and health professionals for restoring health rather than merely managing disease,” said Kelly. “ACLM is actively addressing each of these areas.”

Diabetes has a devastating impact on the quality of life of millions of Americans.  Treatment for diabetes is also a major contributor to the country’s health care spending. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 90 percent of the nation’s $3.3 trillion in annual health care expenditure pays for the treatment of chronic health conditions, including type 2 diabetes. In the United States

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medicine

Editas Medicine Reports Inducement Grants to New Chief Medical Officer

CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Nov. 10, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Editas Medicine, Inc. (Nasdaq: EDIT), a leading genome editing company, today announced the grant of inducement awards to the Company’s newly appointed Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, Lisa Michaels, M.D. In connection with Dr. Michaels’ appointment, the Editas Medicine Board of Directors approved a stock option grant and a restricted stock unit award to Dr. Michaels as inducements material to Dr. Michaels entering into employment with Editas Medicine in accordance with Nasdaq Listing Rule 5635(c)(4).  The stock option provides for the purchase of up to 120,000 shares of Editas Medicine common stock at a price of $30.41 per share, the closing price per share of Editas Medicine common stock as reported by Nasdaq on the date of grant, and vests over four years, with 25 percent of the shares vesting on the first anniversary of Dr. Michaels’ employment start date, and the remainder vesting ratably at the end of each subsequent month thereafter, subject to Dr. Michaels’ continued service relationship with Editas Medicine through the applicable vesting dates. The restricted stock unit award is for 20,000 shares of Editas Medicine common stock and vests as to 25 percent of the shares on each one-year anniversary of Dr. Michaels’ employment start date until the fourth anniversary of Dr. Michaels’ employment start date, subject to Dr. Michaels’ continued service to Editas Medicine through the applicable vesting dates.

About Editas Medicine
As a leading genome editing company, Editas Medicine is focused on translating the power and potential of the CRISPR/Cas9 and CRISPR/Cas12a (also known as Cpf1) genome editing systems into a robust pipeline of treatments for people living with serious diseases around the world. Editas Medicine aims to discover, develop, manufacture, and commercialize transformative, durable, precision genomic medicines for a broad class of diseases. For the latest information and scientific presentations, please visit www.editasmedicine.com.

CONTACT: Contacts: Media Cristi Barnett (617) 401-0113 [email protected] Investors Mark Mullikin (617) 401-9083 [email protected]

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fitness

Planet Fitness Opens “Judgement Free” Gym in Downtown Seattle

SEATTLE (Nov. 10, 2020) – Planet Fitness – one of the nation’s largest and fastest-growing franchisors and operators of fitness centers with more members than any other fitness brand – has opened in Downtown Seattle at 601 Pine St., Seattle WA 98101.

As Planet Fitness’ 24th club in the Seattle area, the 16,364-square-foot Downtown Seattle club offers state-of-the-art cardio machines and strength equipment, 30-Minute Express Circuit, fully equipped locker rooms with day lockers and showers, numerous flat screen televisions, HydroMassage beds, massage chairs, tanning beds, a Total Body Enhancement booth and more in a hassle-free, non-intimidating environment.

Now through Nov. 18, members can join for $1 down with no commitment for Classic membership – which includes unlimited access and free fitness training at Planet Fitness Downtown Seattle – or PF Black Card® membership – which includes the ability to bring a guest every day at no additional charge, access to all 2,000+ Planet Fitness locations in all 50 states, plus access to massage beds and chairs and tanning, among other benefits which vary by location and local restrictions. Registration is available in person or online at www.planetfitness.com/gyms/sea….

As with all Planet Fitness clubs, the Downtown Seattle club operates with enhanced protocols for working out in the safest way possible including: required facemasks, increased sanitation, employee temperature checks, touchless check-in featuring COVID-19 wellness questions for all members and guests, signage promoting Social Fitnessing™ throughout the facility, and Crowd Meter on Planet Fitness’ mobile app that allows members to check club capacity before coming into the gym.

“Planet Fitness believes fitness is essential to the physical and mental health of Seattle residents who are eager to get out of the house and resume their active lifestyles. Fitness also plays a critical role in building a stronger immune system, helping protect against severe COVID-19,” said Victor Brick, co-owner of PF Growth Partners, a franchise division of Planet Fitness. “Planet Fitness Downtown Seattle aims to do its part in combatting this ongoing pandemic by providing access for people to exercise and stay healthy.”

The pandemic has taken a physical and mental toll on the nation. State lockdowns led to a 32 percent reduction in physical activity among individuals who were physically active. Washington State already suffers from high obesity rates, with 28.3 percent being considered overweight. This makes access to exercise now even more vital as physical activity provides numerous health benefits including the ability to maintain weight, strengthen muscles, and prevent chronic illness.

Regular physical activity is also known to reduce the symptoms of depression and anxiety. This takes on even more significance in light of a July poll conducted by the Kaiser Foundation which found that more than half of U.S. adults reported that their mental health has been negatively impacted due to the COVID-19 pandemic, up 32 percent from March.

Planet Fitness Downtown Seattle is currently open and staffed Monday through Friday, from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday, from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

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dentist

Black dentist says NYPD accused him of breaking into his own office

A black Manhattan dentist says cops racially profiled him when they accused him of breaking into his own office while he was taking out the trash one night in March, according to papers filed with the city comptroller’s office.

Dr. Benjamin Shirley, 41, briefly left and came back into his Upper West Side office building after throwing out the trash around midnight on March 9, when the cops allegedly approached the door shining lights inside and demanding that he identify himself, according to a $5 million notice of claim against the city and surveillance video of the incident.

The cops spoke to Shirley through the intercom threatening to break into the office despite the fact he told them he was the owner, his lawyer told The Post.

Two cops, “attempted to unlawfully gain entry to the building by force and repeatedly called [Shirley] threatening to destroy his property and enter with force if he did not come outside despite the fact that at all times, they lacked any probable cause or reasonable belief that [Shirley] had committed any crime,” the notice of claim alleges.

“They were threatening to break in, they were threatening to break down the security equipment, they were threatening to break down the door and go inside,” Shirley’s lawyer, Reza Rezvani, told The Post.

The incident made Shirley scared for his life, prompting him to call 911, the claim papers say.

“I’m actually being harassed by the cops here,” Shirley said in the 911 call obtained by The Post. “I’m pretty scared here. I’m working in my office and they shine the flashlight in my face.”

“I’m trying to ask them why they are bothering me, and he said he saw me walking in here,” Shirley told the 911 operator. “They are asking me for my ID and I’m not doing anything … I don’t know if it’s because I’m African American.”

“Imagine how terrifying it is to have to call the police on the police and then to be met with no help,” Rezvani said. “It’s the definition of helplessness.”

After roughly 30 minutes and two more cops arriving to the scene, Shirley came to the door and had to show his ID — which listed the office address — before the police finally left.

“Despite the fact that [Shirley’s] state-issued identification lists the address of the location of incident, [Shirley] was forced to provide his identification to [the police officers] multiple times before they would agree to leave,” the claim papers continue.

Rezvani told The Post that Shirley didn’t go outside to meet the cops sooner during the encounter because he was scared.

“It’s midnight, he’s black, they are shining flashlights inside — that’s how you set up all kinds of bad things happening,” Rezvani said. “To casually walk out, it’s not possible in that scenario.”

“What happened to him is common and it shouldn’t be,” Rezvani said. “The idea that this could happen to a man going to his office because of his skin

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