Day: November 9, 2020

medicine

Dave Grohl teases Foo Fighters’ ‘party album’ Medicine at Midnight | Celebrity news

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Dave Grohl teases Foo Fighters' 'party album' Medicine at Midnight

Foo Fighters’ new record ‘Medicine at Midnight’ is their “Saturday night party album”.

Dave Grohl and co gave fans the first taste of their delayed 10th LP with the lead single, ‘Shame Shame’, which they debuted on ‘Saturday Night Live’ over the weekend.

And now, the ‘Learn to Fly’ hitmaker has teased that fans can expect a totally different and “fresh” sound on their follow-up to 2017’s ‘Concrete + Gold’.

Speaking to NME.com, Grohl said of their upcoming nine-track collection: “Since it’s our 10th record and 25th anniversary, we decided years ago that we wanted to do something that sounded fresh. We’ve made so many different types of album, we’ve done acoustic things, we’ve done punk-rock things, mid-tempo Americana type of things. We have a lot of albums to fall back on, so you just have to go with our gut feeling and I thought instead of making some mellow adult album, I thought ‘F*** that, let’s make a party album.'”

Asked what type of “party” it is, the former Nirvana drummer explained: “A lot of our favorite records have these big grooves and riffs. I hate to call it a funk or dance record, but it’s more energetic in a lot of ways than anything we’ve ever done and it was really designed to be that Saturday night party album. It was written and sequenced in a way that you put on, and nine songs later you’ll just put it on again. Y’know, songs like ‘Making A Fire’. To me that’s rooted in Sly & The Family Stone grooves, but amplified in the way that the Foo Fighters do it.”

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fitness

At-home fitness may outlast coronavirus pandemic as digital offerings keep customers engaged

At-home workouts have been the go-to solution since the onset of the coronavirus pandemic and with new cases surging and winter approaching, the trend may be far from over. 

Companies first saw an influx of new members amid widespread lockdown orders when droves of Americans were holed up inside and gyms were shuttered. Companies are preparing for continued demand as cold weather is likely to keep even more fitness junkies indoors.

At-home fitness has always been a part of people’s lives, however, due to technological advancements and social media, working out at home has come a long way since the early 1980s when American actress Jane Fonda and others took over the scene with VHS exercise tapes. The videos sold tens of millions of copies and ignited a swath of TV workout programs, according to the BBC. However, the outdated tapes are a far cry from the virtual trainers and live-streamed classes that many are privy to today.

This new technology is a key tool for many companies in helping to keep consumers both motivated and inspired especially amid the current climate.

CORONAVIRUS ACCELERATES STREAMING FITNESS CLASS INDUSTRY

In a recent earnings call, Planet Fitness CEO Chris Rondeau noted that the company’s United We Move initiative, which offers free at-home workouts through its social media pages, “continues to see strong results.” The program has reached 45 million viewers in 36 countries since the pandemic began, Rondeau said.

Planet Fitness isn’t alone.

Total connected fitness subscriptions for Peloton climbed to more than 1.33 million at the end of the quarter and total digital subscriptions grew 382% to over 510,000.

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All of its fitness members completed more than 90 million workouts across over 17,000 classes, up 332% year-over-year. As a result, the company says it’s continuing to “ramp content production” producing over 2,400 new classes in the last quarter alone.

Ticker Security Last Change Change %
PTON PELOTON INTERACTIVE 100.01 -25.45 -20.29%
PLNT PLANET FITNESS INC 78.07 +10.88 +16.19%
NKE NIKE INC. 128.95 +0.05 +0.04%

Moving forward, the company expects to see “elevated engagement levels, higher penetration of digital subscriptions, and continued fitness and wellness programming investments,” according to an earnings report.

For Nike, it’s all about “dialing up” its digital ecosystem and “leveraging” its entire digital portfolio, Heidi O’Neill, Nike president of consumer and marketplace, told FOX Business.

This includes Nike.com, the Nike app, Nike Run Club app, the Nike Training Club app and Nike social channels. Nike Run Club alone welcomed more than 1 million new runners in March and saw a 42% increase in runs logged, the company told FOX Business.

Home fitness company Mirror sells full-length mirrors that give consumers access to on-demand workouts. It also saw a surge in business with workouts per household growing 70% during peak COVID months, a company spokesperson told FOX Business.

Mirror

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dentist

Dentist’s Virus Suit Returned To State Court Despite Protest


By Archive



Email Daphne Zhang


href=”https://www.law360.com/#”>Daphne Zhang

Law360 is providing free access to its coronavirus coverage to make sure all members of the legal community have accurate information in this time of uncertainty and change. Use the form below to sign up for any of our daily newsletters. Signing up for any of our section newsletters will opt you in to the daily Coronavirus briefing.

Law360 (November 9, 2020, 4:50 PM EST) —
A Texas federal judge on Monday sent a dentist’s COVID-19 coverage suit back to state court in a final ruling and closed the case despite protests by Allstate Insurance Co., saying a magistrate judge’s earlier recommendation held up after a period of court review.

U.S. District Judge Fred Biery adopted U.S. Magistrate Judge Richard B. Farrer’s October recommendation to return the case to state court, terminating the suit in federal court and holding that no parties could show the report was “erroneous or contrary to law.”

“We believe the court followed the law, and we are happy with the remand order,” said Shannon Loyd, an attorney representing the dentist. “In Texas, adjusters have liability under the Insurance Code if they fail to conduct a reasonable investigation — which is for a jury to decide.”

In October, Judge Farrer said the case should be remanded back to state court, holding that Allstate failed to show a claims adjuster was wrongly joined and that the suit did not meet the diversity of jurisdiction required in federal court.

Judge Farrer said Orsatti DDS PC, a dental office in Bexar County, Texas, has sufficiently alleged the adjuster failed to conduct a proper investigation of its claim.

Allstate fired back at the magistrate’s judge’s recommendation in late October, saying there was nothing for the claim adjuster to investigate since the dental office did not experience any property damage covered in the policy.

The carrier contended that though the dental office accused adjuster Blessing Sefofo Wonyaku of inadequate claim investigation, there was “no physical evidence” for Wonyaku to consider because Orsatti did not allege COVID-19 was present on its property for the adjuster to inspect.

Allstate claimed the dental practice was trying to increase the complexity of the case by wrongly including Wonyaku, a Texas citizen, to destroy complete diversity of citizenship for the case to stay in federal court.

Last week, in response to the insurer’s October objection against sending the case back to state court, the dental office said the claim adjuster was not wrongly joined and that it “clearly has stated numerous plausible claims for relief against” him.

Orsatti suspended business because of the government pandemic closure orders in March. The office said it lost income and filed a coverage claim with Allstate. The Illinois-based carrier then assigned commercial property adjuster Wonyaku to investigate the claim. Orsatti said the adjuster never asked for any documents or information related to its claim.

Allstate subsequently denied coverage, asserting a virus exclusion and a lack of physical damage to Orsatti’s property. In

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medicine

I took the Pfizer covid-19 vaccine. It’s a miracle for genetic medicine.

Walter Isaacson, a professor at Tulane, is the author of “The Code Breaker: Jennifer Doudna, Gene Editing, and the Future of the Human Race,” to be published in March.

“Look me in the eyes,” the doctor ordered, staring at me from behind her plastic face guard. Her eyes were blue, almost as blue as her hospital mask. Yet, after a moment, I started to turn and face the doctor on my left, who was jabbing a long needle deep into the muscle of my upper arm. “No!” the first doctor snapped. “Look at me!”

Then she explained. Because I was part of a double-blind clinical trial of an experimental covid-19 vaccine, they had to make sure that I didn’t get any clues about whether I was being injected with a real dose or merely a placebo made of saline solution.

It was early August, and I had enlisted in the clinical trial for the vaccine that has just reported very promising results: the one developed by Pfizer with the German company BioNTech. It is a new type of RNA vaccine that has never before been deployed.

Vaccines work by stimulating a person’s immune system. One traditional approach is to inject a weakened version of the dangerous virus. That’s the way we now fend off measles, mumps, rubella and chickenpox. Another method is to use a version of the virus or a part of the virus that has been totally killed.

The success of the Pfizer vaccine means that the plague year of 2020 will be remembered as the time when traditional vaccines began to be supplanted by genetic vaccines. Instead of delivering tiny and safe doses of the virus itself, these new vaccines deliver a piece of genetic coding that will instruct human cells to produce, on their own, components of a targeted virus. These safe components can then stimulate the patient’s immune system.

[Full coverage of the coronavirus pandemic]

It is another wondrous miracle from a biotech revolution in which knowledge of genetic coding will become as important as digital coding and molecules will become the new microchips.

I enrolled in the trial at Ochsner Hospital in my hometown of New Orleans partly to be a good citizen but also because I’m writing a book about the gene-editing tool known as CRISPR, and the star molecule in the book is RNA. The vaccine that was developed by Pfizer and BioNTech makes use of the most basic functions that RNA performs: serving as a messenger RNA (mRNA) that carries genetic instructions from DNA, which is bunkered inside a cell’s nucleus, to the manufacturing region of the cell, where it directs what protein to make. In the case of the covid-19 vaccine, the mRNA instructs cells to make a version of the spike protein that is on the surface of a coronavirus. That spike protein can then stimulate our immune system to create antibodies that will protect against the real coronavirus. In addition to the Pfizer version, the

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dentist

Dentist Says Virus Caused Property Damage In Insurance Suit


By Archive



Email Daphne Zhang


href=”https://www.law360.com/#”>Daphne Zhang

Law360 is providing free access to its coronavirus coverage to make sure all members of the legal community have accurate information in this time of uncertainty and change. Use the form below to sign up for any of our daily newsletters. Signing up for any of our section newsletters will opt you in to the daily Coronavirus briefing.

Law360 (November 9, 2020, 4:19 PM EST) —
A Minnesota dental office said more courts across the country have rejected insurers’ bids to dismiss COVID-19 business interruption suits for policies without a virus exclusion, telling a Texas federal judge that it has sufficiently pled physical damage.

Christie Jo Berkseth-Rojas, who runs Rojas Family Dental in Minneapolis, said Friday that a greater number of courts have axed insurers’ dismissal motions in suits involving policies that don’t contain a virus exclusion like the one her office held with Aspen American Insurance Co.

The dentist cited data from the University of Pennsylvania Law School’s virus-related litigation tracker, which listed that courts have denied the insurers’ dismissal bids in 10 cases while granting them in eight cases concerning policies that do not have a virus exclusion. There have been over 1,200 business interruption suits filed so far, according to the school.

In Friday’s response, the dentist said that the “courthouse could no longer serve the administration of justice as it had before,” because grand jury proceedings, public trials and in-person depositions are limited for cases like hers, claiming that her office incurred physical loss of use because of COVID-19 just as courts across the country have.

The Minneapolis dental office hit Aspen with a proposed class action after the carrier denied coverage for her business losses stemming from government closure orders in March. In September, Aspen urged the federal court to follow the “daily growing” number of rulings that have said insureds don’t need to show their property was tangibly altered to claim physical damage.

On Friday, the dental office said it successfully pled physical damage from its lost use of its property. The office said Aspen can’t argue that physical damage always requires structural change, because it never changed coverage requirements from “direct physical loss of or damage” to “physical alteration” or “structural alteration” in the policy.

“The insurance industry has left this language substantively unchanged for decades,” the dental practice said.

Even if direct physical damage means structural alteration, the office has sufficiently claimed it because the virus will “infest property and stick to its surfaces, alter the structure of those surfaces and the air within the property, and lead to claims of business interruption losses,” the practice added.

Additionally, courts have ruled on multiple occasions that property infiltration “by microscopic entities” like COVID-19 constitutes direct physical loss or damage, according to the suit. The practice also cited case law, saying that the Minnesota court of appeals ruled “direct physical loss can exist without actual destruction of property or structural damage to property.”

Aspen’s contention that

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medicine

Opinion | I took the Pfizer covid-19 vaccine. It’s a miracle for genetic medicine.

Then she explained. Because I was part of a double-blind clinical trial of an experimental covid-19 vaccine, they had to make sure that I didn’t get any clues about whether I was being injected with a real dose or merely a placebo made of saline solution.

Vaccines work by stimulating a person’s immune system. One traditional approach is to inject a weakened version of the dangerous virus. That’s the way we now fend off measles, mumps, rubella and chickenpox. Another method is to use a version of the virus or a part of the virus that has been totally killed.

The success of the Pfizer vaccine means that the plague year of 2020 will be remembered as the time when traditional vaccines began to be supplanted by genetic vaccines. Instead of delivering tiny and safe doses of the virus itself, these new vaccines deliver a piece of genetic coding that will instruct human cells to produce, on their own, components of a targeted virus. These safe components can then stimulate the patient’s immune system.

It is another wondrous miracle from a biotech revolution in which knowledge of genetic coding will become as important as digital coding and molecules will become the new microchips.

I enrolled in the trial at Ochsner Hospital in my hometown of New Orleans partly to be a good citizen but also because I’m writing a book about the gene-editing tool known as CRISPR, and the star molecule in the book is RNA. The vaccine that was developed by Pfizer and BioNTech makes use of the most basic functions that RNA performs: serving as a messenger RNA (mRNA) that carries genetic instructions from DNA, which is bunkered inside a cell’s nucleus, to the manufacturing region of the cell, where it directs what protein to make. In the case of the covid-19 vaccine, the mRNA instructs cells to make a version of the spike protein that is on the surface of a coronavirus. That spike protein can then stimulate our immune system to create antibodies that will protect against the real coronavirus. In addition to the Pfizer version, the Cambridge, Mass.-based company Moderna is also making an mRNA vaccine.

When I volunteered, I was told that the study could last two years. That raised a few questions. What would happen, I asked the coordinator, if the vaccine got approved before then? She told me that I would then be “unblinded,” meaning that they would tell me if I had gotten the placebo and, if so, immediately give me the real vaccine.

What would happen if some other company’s vaccine got approved while our trial was still underway? “That’s not been decided,” she conceded.

So, I went to the top. I posed these questions to Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, which is funding and overseeing the vaccine studies. “You have asked a question that is currently engaging the members of the Vaccines Working Group in serious debate,” he replied. Just a few days earlier, a

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fitness

Thousands of Local Gyms Urge Congress to Include Direct Support for Fitness Industry in Any Post-Election Relief Package

WASHINGTON, Nov. 9, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The Community Gyms Coalition (CGC), a group representing more than 15,000 community gyms in the US, today urged Congress to include direct support for the fitness industry in any post-election relief legislation, in order to help gyms survive the financial impact of mandatory closures and operating restrictions from the COVD-19 pandemic. Leaders in the fitness industry rallying behind the relief effort include CrossFit, Mindbody, Orangetheory Fitness, Self Esteem Brands, Xponential Fitness, and Zumba Fitness. 

“Community gyms keep America healthy, but they are struggling to survive due to local closures and operating restrictions, which have been among the most stringent for any industry,” said Jordan Holland, owner of Riot Athletics CrossFit in Seattle, Washington. “Many gyms have been forced to close for six months or longer or operate with a fraction of the customers they need to break even. Debt continues to climb, and cash reserves are long gone. Without direct support, thousands of gyms will close their doors, never to reopen, and tens of millions of Americans will face the long-term health consequences, as our current health crisis leads to a new surge in obesity, depression, and chronic disease. We urge Congress to pass legislation with direct support to help thousands of small to midsize community gyms survive.”

A recent analysis by fitness industry association IHRSA found that up to one-quarter of all fitness facilities, or 10,000 gyms, could close by the end of 2020, absent federal relief. According to data released by Yelp, the nation’s gyms and fitness facilities currently face higher closure rates than nearly any other industry, including restaurants and bars. As of August 31, Yelp data showed 6,024 closed fitness facilities, with 57 percent temporary closures and 43 percent permanent closures. 

“This is an important opportunity to join my colleagues in the fitness industry to bring our voices together to support small business owners across the country who need help,” said Andy Gundlach, owner of several Anytime Fitness and Basecamp Fitness locations across Wisconsin. “Fitness and helping people find ways to be healthy and well is important during the pandemic. The relief we need will help restore our industry to continue to make sure people have access to our clubs at such an important time for our country.”

Based on the number of US fitness facilities, the Yelp data implies a gym closure rate nearly five times the restaurant industry and one-third higher than the bar/nightclub industry, using comparative data around industry sizes. Like restaurants, gyms have been unable to fully participate in other federal relief programs due to limitations on the use of funds for standard costs incurred by small and mid-sized gyms. To address those issues, the House passed $120 billion in similar industry-specific support for restaurants as part of the updated HEROES Act. 

“The fitness industry plays a critical role in improving the physical and mental health of millions of Americans, said Adam Krell, OrangeTheory Fitness franchisee in New

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medicine

Future Market Insights Revises Sports Medicine Market Forecast, as COVID-19 Pandemic Continues to Expand Quickly

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Nov 09, 2020 (MARKITWIRED via COMTEX) —
In the upcoming research study on the Sports Medicine market by Future Market Insights (FMI) is a valuable source of information for market players vying to establish a strong foothold in the current Sports Medicine market landscape. The detailed assessment of the Sports Medicine market offers domestic as well as international market players a clear picture of the prospective growth opportunities in various geographies.

The novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) has caused a slowdown in business activities of the Sports Medicine market. With the help of our upcoming report, market players can gain important insights on alternative strategies that can help in revenue generation. Learn which countries are flourishing amidst the Coronavirus era and how your product offerings can reach the right target consumer. The leading factors that are likely to impact the growth of the Sports Medicine market over the assessment period are thoroughly analyzed in the report.

For more insights into the Market, Request a Sample of this [email protected]https://www.futuremarketinsights.com/reports/sample/rep-gb-5173

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  • A methodical process adopted to create insightful market reports
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Report available at concessionary prices for first-time buyers! Offer expires soon!

Various Segments of the Keyword Market Evaluated in the Report:

Region

  • North America
  • Latin America
  • Europe
  • Japan
  • APEJ
  • MEA

Product Type

  • Body Reconstruction
  • Body Support and Recovery
  • Body Monitoring and Evaluation
  • Accessories

Competitive Analysis

The competitive analysis chapter of the report sheds light on the major developments of the prominent players operating in the Sports Medicine market. The report provides information related to the recent mergers, acquisitions, partnerships, and other strategic alliances within the Sports Medicine market. Further, the pricing, sales, promotional, and marketing strategies of each company are enclosed in the report.

Download Table of [email protected] https://www.futuremarketinsights.com/toc/rep-gb-5173

Prominent players profiled in the report:

  • Breg Inc., Johnson & Johnson, Medtronic Plc, Wright Medical Group N.V., Mueller Sports Medicine, Inc., Zimmer Biomet Holdings, Inc., CONMED Corporation, Stryker Corporation, Smith & Nephew Plc., and Arthrex, Inc., have been profiled.

Important queries addressed in the report:

  1. Which company is expected to dominate the Sports Medicine market in terms of market share in 2019?
  2. How has the evolving regulatory framework impacted the growth of the Sports Medicine market?
  3. Which application of the Sports Medicine is anticipated to generate the maximum revenue during the forecast period?
  4. What are the current trends in the Sports Medicine market?
  5. How are market players adjusting to the fluctuating prices of essential raw materials?

Crucial data that can be drawn from the Sports Medicine market report:

  • The political and economic environment of different regions and their impact on the Sports Medicine market
  • Growth opportunities for market players in the emerging markets
  • Current and future prospects of various applications of the Sports Medicine
  • Y-o-Y growth projection of the different
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fitness

Supporters Celebrate Veterans Day with Functional Fitness Workout

Participants will complete 11 rounds of five exercises representing the branches of service and the rich history of Veterans Day virtually or in their local communities. More than 100 gyms have registered to host a WOD for Warriors, following local health guidance.

“WOD for Warriors is a great opportunity to support veterans through functional fitness,” said Mike Erwin, Executive Director of Team RWB. “We’re thrilled that The Vitamin Shoppe, our partners, and hundreds of participants across the nation are joining us this year.”

All proceeds support Team RWB’s mission while enabling community members to do more than say “Thank You” this Veterans Day.

“The Vitamin Shoppe and all of our Health Enthusiasts associates are honored to join this year’s WOD for Warriors in support of Team RWB, and help power its health and wellness mission that so closely aligns to our own. I know our incredible partners at BPI Sports, MuscleTech, Outright, ProSupps, and RedCon1 join me in a heartfelt salute to all the veterans who have served our nation and communities. There has never been a more meaningful time to recognize their spirit of honor, commitment and drive, and for us all to learn from that example,” said Sharon Leite, CEO of The Vitamin Shoppe.

To prepare for the workout, veterans and supporters have been participating in a Team RWB training plan by Army officer and 2x CrossFit Games athlete Chandler Smith, which began on October 16. Partner exercises, modifications, and an adaptive WOD (workout of the day) developed by the Wounded Warrior Project are available to offer athletes of all abilities the opportunity to sweat their support.

Participants are invited to join a live stream WOD for Warriors event at 5:30 p.m. (Eastern) hosted in Tampa, FL, by Yuengling Beer at Cigar City CrossFit. The live stream will be made available through the Team RWB App on November 11.

Learn more or register for WOD for Warriors at teamrwb.org/w4w. 

About Team Red, White & Blue
Team Red, White & Blue (Team RWB), a nonprofit organization founded in 2010, is forging America’s leading health and wellness community for military veterans, families, and their supporters. With Team RWB, all veterans have the opportunity to reclaim what was most precious about their military service: an unwavering sense of belonging born of challenges that show us what we are capable of. For more information, visit teamrwb.org.

Contact: Bana Miller
[email protected]

SOURCE Team Red, White & Blue

Related Links

http://teamrwb.org

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fitness

Are Group Fitness Classes Safe During the Pandemic? | The Strategist

Photo: Cole Burston/Getty/Getty Images

Since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, kettlebells and resistance bands have been hot commodities (right up there with toilet paper and hand sanitizer) as we pivoted from working out at the gym to exercising at home. Those of us who like the motivation of following along with an instructor turned to virtual workout classes on Instagram Live and other subscription platforms for our fitness fix. Streaming a class at home isn’t exactly the same as participating in person, though, especially if you enjoy the camaraderie of a group class or are tempted to press pause mid-workout. So when gyms and studios took their classes outside to parks and rooftops during the spring and summer to allow for social distancing (Physique 57, 305 Fitness, Barry’s, and Tone House are still offering outdoor classes throughout the city this month), working out almost started to feel normal again.

But what will we do when it gets too cold? Depending on local regulations, reopened gyms have introduced a variety of safety measurements. Crunch, for example, is limiting occupancy to one-third in many gyms and installing advanced air-filtration systems. Last month, Equinox opened Equinox+ In the Wild, a full outdoor gym near Hudson Yards that offers both ground classes and equipment for working out on your own. With heat lamps and tented areas, it’ll be a safe, outdoor option even as winter approaches.

Indoor group classes are currently not allowed in New York City, but if they do open up (or you live in an area where they’re happening), how can you best protect yourself and others from COVID? To find out, we asked two infectious-disease doctors — W. David Hardy of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and Peter Katona of the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA — about everything from exercising with a mask to sharing equipment.

Both doctors agree that, weather permitting, outdoor classes are still the way to go. “If you’re outdoors, you’ve got sunlight, you’ve got temperature, you’ve got air currents — you’ve got all these things working in your favor,” Katona says. But if you don’t have that option and you find yourself in an indoor class, there are steps that you and your gym can take to make the experience as safe as possible.

One thing to look out for is how well your studio promotes air circulation, whether through leaving doors or windows open or maintaining a high-quality HVAC system. Class capacity should also be far smaller than in normal times to allow for distancing — lots of distancing. “Six feet would be the bare minimum,” Hardy says, “because while you’re exercising, you are breathing forcefully.” Those hard exhalations could cause you to expel more respiratory particles, and those particles could travel a longer distance compared to regular breathing. You should also

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