Day: October 26, 2020

medicine

Aesthetic Medicine and Cosmetics Market 2020 Global Analysis, Opportunities And Forecast to 2025

“Aesthetic Medicine and Cosmetics Market”

Wiseguyreports.Com Adds “Aesthetic Medicine and Cosmetics -Market Demand, Growth, Opportunities and Analysis Of Top Key Player Forecast To 2025” To Its Research Database

Aesthetic Medicine and Cosmetics Industry

Description

Wiseguyreports.Com Adds “Aesthetic Medicine and Cosmetics -Market Demand, Growth, Opportunities and Analysis Of Top Key Player Forecast To 2025” To Its Research Database

The report begins from overview of Industry Chain structure, and describes industry environment, then analyses market size and forecast of Aesthetic Medicine and Cosmetics by product, region and application, in addition, this report introduces market competition situation among the vendors and company profile, besides, market price analysis and value chain features are covered in this report.

This report contains opportunities, strengths, threats, and weaknesses (SWOT) analysis for this market. They have taken many aspects into account for analysis, including sales volume, revenue level of the last few years, product demands, customer retention, etc. A majority of information has been collected from primary sources, and analysts have taken effective samples. As the market size is large, analysts have taken large sample sizes from different regions of the globe. They also calculated the Aesthetic Medicine and Cosmetics Market’s customer churns level because it plays a vital role in sales volume. This research analysis report can help this Aesthetic Medicine and Cosmetics Market to become sustainable in the market from a global context.

Request For Sample Report @ https://www.wiseguyreports.com/sample-request/5043846-global-aesthetic-medicine-and-cosmetics-market-analysis-2015

Company Coverage (Company Profile, Sales Revenue, Price, Gross Margin, Main Products etc.):

NuYu Medispa
Al Qamra Holding Group
Premium Naseem
Dr. Makki Plastic Surgicentre
Medica Group
Silkor
Al Emadi Hospital

Product Type Coverage (Market Size & Forecast, Major Company of Product Type etc.):
Surgical Procedures
Non-Surgical Procedures

Application Coverage (Market Size & Forecast, Different Demand Market by Region, Main Consumer Profile etc.):
Hospitals & Clinics
Beauty Centers & Medical Spas
Others

Region Coverage (Regional Production, Demand & Forecast by Countries etc.):
North America (U.S., Canada, Mexico)
Europe (Germany, U.K., France, Italy, Russia, Spain etc.)
Asia-Pacific (China, India, Japan, Southeast Asia etc.)
South America (Brazil, Argentina etc.)
Middle East & Africa (Saudi Arabia, South Africa etc.)

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Table of Contents

1 Industry Overview
1.1 Aesthetic Medicine and Cosmetics Industry
Figure Aesthetic Medicine and Cosmetics Industry Chain Structure
1.1.1 Overview
1.1.2 Development of Aesthetic Medicine and Cosmetics
1.2 Market Segment
1.2.1 Upstream
Table Upstream Segment of Aesthetic Medicine and Cosmetics
1.2.2 Downstream
Table Application Segment of Aesthetic Medicine and Cosmetics
Table Global Aesthetic Medicine and Cosmetics Market 2015-2025, by Application, in USD Million
1.3 Cost Analysis

2 Industry Environment (PEST Analysis)
2.1 Policy
2.2 Economics
2.3 Sociology
2.4 Technology

….

4 Major Companies List
4.1 NuYu Medispa (Company Profile, Sales Data etc.)
4.1.1 NuYu Medispa Profile
Table NuYu Medispa Overview List
4.1.2 NuYu Medispa Products & Services
4.1.3 NuYu Medispa Business Operation Conditions
Table Business Operation of NuYu Medispa (Sales Revenue, Sales Volume, Price, Cost, Gross Margin)
4.2 Al Qamra Holding Group (Company Profile, Sales Data etc.)
4.2.1 Al Qamra Holding Group Profile
Table Al

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health

Pediatricians say nearly 800K children have had coronavirus

Almost 800,000 children in the U.S. have been infected by COVID-19 this year, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) said Monday, adding that current cases among children are rising.



a group of people sitting around a living room: Pediatricians say nearly 800K children have had coronavirus


© Getty Images
Pediatricians say nearly 800K children have had coronavirus

In their latest state-level data report, the AAP shared statistics that demonstrate a growing prevalence of coronavirus among youth.

Currently there are about 8.4 million cases of the coronavirus in the U.S., with children now making up 11 percent of that number – about 1,053 cases per 100,000 kids.

During the period from Oct. 8 to Oct. 22, there were 4,555 new youth cases reported, a 14 percent increase.

So far, deaths and hospitalizations among children diagnosed with the coronavirus have been quite rare. Only 1 percent to 3.6 percent of total reported hospitalizations were kids, and children made up 0 percent to 0.23 percent of reported deaths stemming from COVID-19. Sixteen states reported that no children had died as a result of the virus.

The AAP based their findings on reports from 49 states, New York City, Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico and Guam.

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Source Article

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health

Global Coalition for Adaptive Research, Amgen, and Eisai Announce First Patient Enrolled in International COVID-19 Trial

Amgen and Eisai to Participate in the Immune Modulation Domain of REMAP-COVID, an Adaptive Clinical Trial to Test Interventions for Patients Hospitalized With COVID-19

Amgen’s Apremilast and Eisai’s Eritoran to Be Evaluated Across Multiple International Trial Sites Within the REMAP Network

Global Coalition for Adaptive Research (LOS ANGELES, CA), Amgen (THOUSAND OAKS, CA), and Eisai Co., Ltd. (TOKYO, Japan “Eisai”) — The Global Coalition for Adaptive Research (GCAR) in collaboration with Amgen and Eisai Co., Ltd., today announced enrollment of the first patient in the immune modulation domain of REMAP-COVID, a sub-study of REMAP-CAP (A Randomized, Embedded, Multifactorial, Adaptive Platform trial for Community-Acquired Pneumonia) that tests multiple interventions for the treatment of patients hospitalized with COVID-19. Amgen’s apremilast and Eisai’s investigational eritoran are being evaluated as potential therapeutic agents.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201026005657/en/

REMAP-CAP was developed to test treatments for severe pneumonia both in non-pandemic and pandemic settings. In February 2020, REMAP-CAP rapidly pivoted to its pandemic mode (the REMAP-COVID sub-study), as per its original intent, to incorporate additional potential treatment regimens specifically targeting COVID-19 and to expand enrollment to COVID-19 patients. This trial is a multicenter, randomized platform study, with treatments tested within groupings or “domains” based on pathway or mechanism of action.

The trial is being conducted in the multi-hospital UPMC (University of Pittsburgh Medical Center) health system along with over 20 hospitals in the United States. Additional global sites across the trial network will follow. University of Pittsburgh is serving as the U.S. Regional Coordinating Center.

“Partnering with the biopharmaceutical industry to be able to efficiently test well-understood targeted agents is critical to understanding treatment paradigms for COVID-19 patients,” says Derek Angus, MD, MPH, FRCP, U.S. Principal Investigator of REMAP and Chief Healthcare Innovation Officer, UPMC Health System. “Today’s announcement marks an important milestone in the collaboration between industry and the scientific and academic community to work collectively to evaluate potentially promising therapies to support patients hospitalized with COVID-19.”

Amgen’s apremilast is an oral drug which inhibits the activity of PDE4 (Phosphodiesterase 4), an enzyme found in inflammatory cells in the human body. By inhibiting PDE4, apremilast is thought to modulate the production of inflammatory cytokines and other mediators, which may prove helpful in inhibiting the inflammatory response associated with the signs, symptoms and pulmonary involvements observed in some COVID-19 patients. Apremilast is currently approved for use in more than 45 countries as an oral treatment for inflammatory diseases including moderate to severe plaque psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis and oral ulcers associated with Behcet’s disease.

“Amgen believes that, based on its mechanism of action, apremilast might help prevent the respiratory distress seen in moderate to severe-stage adult COVID-19 patients,” said David M. Reese, M.D., Executive Vice President of Research and Development at Amgen. “We are proud to be joining REMAP-COVID, which is an important and innovative effort utilizing a platform approach and has the potential to rapidly identify whether apremilast

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health

Clinicians Incensed by Trump’s Claim They’re Inflating COVID Numbers

Medical groups and the clinicians they represent are criticizing President Donald Trump for his claim that their drive for reimbursement for COVID treatment may have raised reported United States fatality rates compared with those of other nations.

Speaking at a campaign event Saturday in Waukesha, Wisconsin, Trump said he thought US doctors were attributing deaths to COVID that their counterparts in other nations would not.

“If somebody is terminally ill with cancer and they have COVID, we report ’em and you know doctors get more money and hospitals get more money. Think of this incentive. So some countries do it differently. If someone is very sick with a bad heart and they die of COVID, they don’t get reported as COVID,” Trump said. “So then you wonder, ‘Why are their cases so low?’ “

Trump did not immediately in this speech cite any specific nations to which he was comparing the US, nor did he refer to any published reports on potential differences in COVID counting. He touched on this theme of testing differences briefly during his campaign appearance, mentioning it in between criticisms of Democratic lawmakers.

“Reprehensible Attack”

Trump’s remarks angered many medical groups and the clinicians they represent, healthcare workers who have endured increased personal risk and, in many cases, notable drops in income because of the pandemic — not to mention the high death rates of frontline healthcare workers. They also challenged Trump’s assertion about how COVID deaths are counted in the United States.

Eva Chalas, MD, president of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), and Maureen G. Phipps, MD, MPH, chief executive officer of ACOG, issued a joint statement accentuating the deaths of those in harm’s way.

“Science is science and data are data. Doctors have no reason to make up or to inflate COVID-19 case numbers,” they said. “In fact, many physicians and other healthcare workers have died from the virus. It is irresponsible and dangerous to suggest that doctors, including obstetrician-gynecologists, have done anything other than bravely battle this pandemic on behalf of their patients and their communities.”

In a tweet, the American Medical Association (AMA) highlighted an October 12 research letter that appeared in JAMA regarding the toll of excess deaths in the US, as reported by Medscape Medical News.

The AMA also put out a tweet with the following statement condemning the “misinformation about how patients are counted”:


The American College of Physicians (ACP) made the same point in a statement Sunday, calling Trump’s comments “a reprehensible attack on physicians’ ethics and professionalism.”

“ACP notes that several recent studies suggest that the actual number of people who have died from COVID-19 is much higher than the terrible toll of 220,000 deaths officially attributed to the virus,” said Jacqueline W. Fincher, MD, president of ACP, in the statement.

Undermining Clinicians

Trump’s statements also may hinder efforts to control the pandemic, said

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health

UCSF doctor estimates US death total if entire country acted like SF

San Francisco has become the poster child for how to control coronavirus cases and deaths amid the pandemic, with its residents wearing masks, businesses and schools reopening slowly and scientists and politicians working together to create public health orders.

The result of the county and city’s vigilant behavior has been the lowest death rate of any major city in the country and remarkably low cases rates considering S.F. is a densely populated city.

What if all Americans followed the Northern California city’s approach to the pandemic?

A lot of deaths would have been avoided, UCSF coronavirus expert Dr. Bob Wachter told the LA Times for a story on S.F.’s COVID-19 success.


“There would be 50,000 dead from the pandemic instead of more than 220,000,” Wachter told the Times.

San Francisco County (pop. 880,000) has recorded 12,152 cases and 140 deaths since the start of the pandemic, with roughly 1,373 cases and 16 deaths per 100,000 residents, according to Johns Hopkins University. By comparison, Los Angeles County (pop. 10 million) has recorded 299,760 cases and 6,993 deaths, with 2,966 cases and 69 deaths per 100,0000; New York County (Manhattan, pop. 1.6 million) falls in at 33,128 total cases and a death toll of 2,545, with 2,034 cases and 156 deaths per 100,000.

Because of its low case and death rates, San Francisco is the first urban center in California to see viral transmission reach the “minimal,” or yellow, tier in the state’s reopening plan. Several rural counties with small populations, such as Shasta and Mendocino counties, are in the most-restrictive purple tier due to widespread infection, requiring many businesses and activities to close.

While many other major U.S. cities such as New York experienced terrifying periods with skyrocketing cases that filled hospital beds beyond capacity, San Francisco has kept its number of cases relatively low, with some ups and downs, yet no major surge that overwhelmed the city’s health care system and impacted its ability to provide optimal care.

“The low case rate is a result of people acting well, and acting well is everything from city health leaders doing the right thing to the people doing the right thing,” Wachter, chair of UCSF’s Department of Medicine, told SFGATE for a previous story on the city’s low death rate. “We have very high rates of mask-wearing, probably the highest in the country. I think from the beginning people have trusted the science, trusted the guidance. You don’t hear in S.F. that COVID is a hoax. People have generally taken this very seriously and I think the leadership from the mayor and the regional health directors has been terrific.”

In April, Wachter sent a team of UCSF doctors to New York to help during the height of the East Coast city’s pandemic and his colleagues told “horror stories about what they saw in good hospitals.”

“At UCSF, you’ll have one nurse taking care of you,” he said. “In Queens, at the height of things, it was one nurse to seven or eight

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health

Ivanka Trump & Jared Kushner Threaten Lawsuit Over Billboards Criticizing Them for COVID-19 Response

TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty The Lincoln Project billboards in New York City

Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner threatened to sue an anti-Trump group over billboards in New York City blasting the senior White House aides for their role in the government’s novel coronavirus (COVID-19) response.

The Lincoln Project, a group of anti-Trump Republicans focused on preventing Donald Trump’s re-election on Nov. 3, recently set up two giant billboards in N.Y.C.’s Times Square that feature the president’s 38-year-old daughter on one and her husband, 39, on another.

In the first billboard, Ivanka is seen smiling and gesturing toward a set of statistics that more than 33,000 New Yorkers and more than 224,000 Americans have died due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

As noted elsewhere, the photo used is the same one that Ivanka posted in a controversial tweet in July promoting Goya beans, which drew backlash from some who said the Trump administration was endorsing a specific company.

In the adjacent billboard, Kushner, who like his wife serves as an adviser to the president, can be seen smiling beside something that Vanity Fair quoted him saying during a meeting in March: “[New Yorkers] are going to suffer and that’s their problem.” (Kushner disputes saying this.)

The bottom of the billboard with his photo is lined with red-and-white body bags.

The billboards are set to remain through at least two days after the election, per The New York Times.

RELATED: CBS Airs 60 Minutes Interview with Trump — Including When He ‘Walked Out’ After Complaining About Tone

Alex Wong/Getty From left: Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump

The couple was not pleased, according to an attorney representing them, who sent a letter on Friday to The Lincoln Project threatening a lawsuit if the billboards were not removed.

Marc E. Kasowitz, the lawyer, called the billboards “false, malicious and defamatory.”

Kasowitz also took issue with the juxtaposition on the billboards between the disputed Kushner quote and Ivanka’s gesture and the other elements tying them to the death toll from the pandemic.

Kasowitz described it as “outrageous and shameful libel.” (He did not immediately respond to PEOPLE’s request for comment.)

“If these billboards are not immediately removed, we will sue you for what will doubtless be enormous compensatory and punitive damages,” he wrote in his letter.

The Lincoln Project, which has built a major media profile (and raised millions) on a series of viral anti-Trump ads and other stunts, quickly posted his letter on social media instead.

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Later on Friday, the group shared its rebuttal on Twitter, calling the president’s daughter and son-in-law “entitled, out-of-touch bullies who have never given the slightest indication they have any regard for the American people.”

“We plan on showing them the same level of respect,” the group wrote in its response.

The

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health

Pregnant Sadie Robertson Says She Was ‘Very Sick’ with COVID-19 but ‘Baby Huff Is Doing Great’

Sadie Robertson is on the mend after contracting the coronavirus.

On Monday, the Duck Dynasty alum, 23, shared a photo from her hospital bed, revealing in her caption that “one of the most challenging things” she has faced as of late has been her battle with COVID-19, which made her “very sick.”

“I know everyone experiences covid differently, but wow these symptoms are wild. I’ve definitely struggled through this one!” she wrote. “Thankfully baby Huff is doing great and healthy, and I am now healing as well. I’m no longer in the hospital (this pic was not from today) and I have just about fully recovered.”

Robertson, who is currently expecting her first child with husband Christian Huff, was diagnosed with coronavirus earlier this month.

“I’ve learned a lot and I have been challenged in a lot of new ways,” she said. “I will say my dependency on Jesus has never felt greater in some of the hardest moment of this sickness. I’m thankful I serve a savior who is with me in these moments that feel rather lonely. My heart and my [family’s] heart goes out to everyone suffering with Covid.”

Related: Sadie Robertson expecting first child with husband

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RELATED: Pregnant Women Seem Unlikely to Pass Coronavirus to Their Babies, Early Studies Show

As the coronavirus continues to spread in the United States, many pregnant women are wondering what they can do to stay as safe as possible and limit their potential for exposure.

In an advisory on their website, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommends expectant mothers to be extra vigilant about following existing precautions, as “available data suggest that pregnant women with COVID-19 may be at increased risk for more severe illness compared with nonpregnant peers.”

While “No increase in the rate of mortality has been noted,” the group says that “these data indicate an elevated risk of [intensive care unit] admissions and mechanical ventilation.”

“Pregnant patients with comorbidities such as obesity and gestational diabetes may be at an even higher risk for severe illness consistent with the general population with similar comorbidities,” the ACOG adds.

Huff and Robertson shared their pregnancy news Oct. 4, on their respective Instagram accounts. “SCREAMING WITH EXCITEMENT TO SHARE THIS NEWS! Baby we already adore you,” the mom-to-be captioned a photo of the pair cuddled up on the couch and showcasing their sonogram, in part.

The couple opened up Wednesday on Robertson’s WHOA That’s Good Podcast about learning the good news, with Huff, 22, saying they weren’t “not trying.”  Noted Robertson, “I guess we shouldn’t have been that surprised, but we were super surprised and so I didn’t think I was pregnant at all.”

After she found herself “ravenous” all day and had a vivid dream about being pregnant (with a son!),

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health

Georgia infections show sharper rise if rapid tests included

ATLANTA (AP) — COVID-19 infections are rising more rapidly in Georgia, in line with a national trend of increasing cases.

The broadest measure of COVID-19 cases, which includes rapid antigen tests as well as the more precise genetic tests, shows the number of confirmed and probable cases was 18% higher in the week that ended Friday compared to the week before, according to a report issued Monday by the Georgia Department of Public Health.

The state recorded 10,086 genetic positives and 2,564 antigen positives last week, tipping Georgia back above 100 weekly cases per 100,000 people, one measure of rapid spread.


Georgia still remains far off its July peaks, when it was averaging 3,700 cases per day, worst in the nation at the time. Because the respiratory illness is now spreading so rapidly in other regions, Georgia ranks only 34th among the states, according to numbers tracked by The Associated Press. Many more cases, per capita, are being recorded in some Midwestern and Western states.

The share of positive genetic tests has risen above 7% statewide in Georgia from a low of 5.5% as late as Oct. 15, suggesting more rapid spread in communities. Experts say that if more than 5% of tests are coming back positive, it suggests that too few tests are being done and many infections may be going undetected.

Public Health Commissioner Kathleen Toomey said earlier this month that the state was planning to include positive rapid antigen tests in its daily report, but has not yet done so. Many other states count those tests no differently than genetic tests, but Georgia officials said they’re worried about the higher rate of false results on the antigen tests.

Despite those concerns, the state publishes antigen numbers in once-weekly county-level reports that are issued on Mondays.

But even just counting genetic tests, the rise in cases in Georgia is increasingly clear. The state’s seven-day daily average of positive tests is up 30% since hitting a low on Oct. 8, according to AP numbers. The seven-day average of hospitalizations is up 7% since hitting a low on Oct. 12.

Deaths, which usually lag behind hospitalizations, have mounted more slowly in recent days. Georgia has recorded 7,827 confirmed deaths from COVID-19 and more than 326,000 cases confirmed through genetic tests. While most people who contract the coronavirus recover after suffering only mild to moderate symptoms, it can be deadly for older patients and those with other health problems.

The numbers are rising as millions of Georgians cast their votes for president and federal and state offices. Democrats have heavily criticized President Donald Trump and Gov. Brian Kemp, both Republicans, for their actions during the pandemic. Kemp has said he’s striking the right balance between health and making sure restrictions don’t choke off economic growth.

Public health officials count 39 high transmission counties, with a group in northwest Georgia that includes the Carrollton, Cartersville, Rome and Dalton areas, parts of rural northeast Georgia north of Athens, and a belt running east

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dentist

How to Find a Good Dentist | Patient Advice

Karen Vasso, a 43-year old farmer from Chelmsford, Massachusetts, takes good care of her health. In addition to the copious amounts of physical exercise she gets while working, she’s an avid swimmer and triathlete, who’s completed a few solo 12.5-mile swims around Key West in Florida. She also has a background in nutrition and knows that good dental health is an important aspect of overall wellness. She’s long sought to make visiting a dentist regularly a priority. However, a couple of bad experiences over the years have caused her to think carefully about what makes a good dentist and how to find the right one for her.

The first incident occurred several years ago. At the time, Vasso was a single mother and her health insurance wasn’t terribly robust, so her options of which dentist she could see were limited. “I went to this quiet, dark office in the basement of a building” in a nearby town. The office was mostly empty, save for the dentist himself, and Vasso recalls thinking, “this is scary.” Undeterred by her gut intuition, she went through with the appointment. “He cleaned my teeth and at the end he said, ‘you have a cavity. I’m going to need you to come back for a filling.’ I know my teeth. I have extensive knowledge about nutrition and how that affects dental health,” and she says she suspected she didn’t actually have a cavity.

She asked the dentist to show her on the X-ray where the cavity was. “He kind of backed out of it. He had nothing, so I left and never went back. Because he was the only dentist my insurance covered, I didn’t go to the dentist for several years,” she says.

Fast forward a few years to a new town and new health insurance, and Vasso decided it was time to do something about the lack of routine dental care she’d had for the past couple of years and scheduled an appointment with a local dentist. She opted for “a very big chain dental practice” that was in her insurance plan and made an appointment for a cleaning. “They did a cleaning and a cursory exam and told me I had six cavities. It blew my mind – there’s no way I have six cavities,” she says, feeling outraged.

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Before she was even able to get clarification on where and how severe these cavities were, she’d been herded to the front desk to settle her bill and make several more appointments for additional dental work. Vasso decided she didn’t trust that dentist and made an appointment elsewhere for a second opinion. As suspected, that subsequent dentist confirmed she had no cavities at all, let alone six of them. “Can you imagine them drilling into my teeth for no reason? It blows my mind,” she says.

While Vasso’s experience may be extreme, it illustrates how important it is to find a dentist you can trust. “The dentist has an obligation to be

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health

White House Official Says ‘We’re Not Going to Control’ COVID-19 as Critics Say Trump ‘Surrendered’

Patrick Semansky/AP/Shutterstock White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows

White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows said in two recent interviews that “we’re not going to control” COVID-19, which led Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and other critics to say President Donald Trump’s administration is giving up on fighting the pandemic.

“We’re going to defeat the virus; we’re not going to control it,” Meadows, 61, told reporters Monday morning, as cases and deaths hit new surges across the U.S. in recent days.

The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) has killed more than 225,000 people across the country so far, according to a New York Times tracker.

“We will try to contain it as best we can,” Meadows said, adding the White House is instead focusing on therapeutics and finding a vaccine.

Biden, 77, said Meadows’ remark was “an acknowledgment of what President Trump’s strategy has clearly been from the beginning of this crisis: to wave the white flag of defeat and hope that by ignoring it, the virus would simply go away. It hasn’t, and it won’t,” the Times reported.

Shutterstock White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows

RELATED: How, When and Where to Vote in the November Election

Biden’s condemnation of the White House’s efforts—or lack thereof—to limit the spread of COVID-19 came after Meadows initially made a similar comment Sunday on CNN’s State of the Union.

“We’re not going to control the pandemic, we are going to control the fact that we get vaccines, therapeutics, and other medications,” Meadows told CNN anchor Jake Tapper.

Looking perplexed, Tapper, 51, responded: “Why aren’t we going to get control of the pandemic?”

“Because it’s a contagious virus, just like the flu,” Meadows said, despite federal health officials having long warned the novel coronavirus is not like the flu and spreads more rapidly, and dangerously, without proper containment efforts. (COVID-19 has killed more people in the U.S. than the last five flu seasons combined.)

“But why not make efforts to contain it?” Tapper asked again, before they began arguing.

Patrick Semansky/AP/Shutterstock White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows speaks to reporters on Monday

RELATED: Four of Vice President Mike Pence’s Aides, Including His Chief of Staff, Test Positive for COVID-19

Meadows’ comments during the CNN interview led to a wave of backlash, as the U.S. now has had more than 8.7 million reported COVID-19 cases—the most in the world.

“The Trump administration would rather let tens of thousands of Americans unnecessarily die than listen to scientists and create a national plan,” Sen. Bernie Sanders, a former Democratic presidential candidate, tweeted.

Sen. Kamala Harris, the Democratic vice presidential nominee, told reporters on Sunday that Meadows’ statement signaled the Trump administration was “admitting defeat,” while New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo told NBC New York: “They surrendered without firing a shot.”

MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images Donald Trump speaks at the White House on October 10 while recovering from COVID-19

RELATED: Top Trump Aide Mark Meadows Held Mask-Less Wedding for His Daughter amid

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