general

Saving My Head from Baldness

One thing that I hoped would never happen to me suddenly did. I noticed after getting out of the shower one day that the top of my head was looking a little thin. I was afraid that my hair was starting to fall out and looked at different ways to counter act it, outside of getting hair plugs or some kind of hair transplant. I found out that Propecia Finasteride is a great product for preventing hair loss, so I got my hands on some as soon as I could.

Most people my age shift into the bald phase when they start to lose their hair. They figure that they won’t look good at all with thinning or lost hair, so they just shave it all off and go completely bald. While the bald look works for some, I don’t think it’s for me.…

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Feeling Like a Younger Man

Ever since turning 40, things have been different for me in the bedroom. My wife and I used to have the most amazing times in bed, but things weren’t as fun as before. I didn’t have the same amount of energy that I did when when first got married. It was like I was a sluggish old man who was trying to satisfy a young woman. I didn’t know what to do, and my wife suggested that I try something like Cialis from the Ciali365 store. I thought about it for a long time and decided that my wife was right, so I ordered some of the product.

I was a little nervous about trying Cialis, because I didn’t know how it would affect me.…

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My Computer is a Real Mess

Of course I let Shell use my laptop a lot, she is over to my place a lot and I like that a lot. I did not like that she ended up getting some really horrendous malware the other day. Apparently she was on the web looking for some cheap careprost, which is a real mystery to me to be honest. I had not a single clue what she meant, but that is apparently some substance which you put on your eyelashes to make them seem thicker or fuller or whatever. I looked at her eyelashes and tried to figure out if they looked different than usual. She got mad at me for not knowing, but I honestly had not ever really focused on that.…

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I Never Thought I’d Have Full Eyelashes

I have never had thick and full eyelashes. It was something I always wanted, but I found that it was something that I would probably not get. At least, that used to be my attitude. I am not the only one in my family with this problem, so I was really surprised to see my cousin with nice thick lashes not long ago. They did not look fake at all, but I knew they had to be. That is why I was surprised when she told me that she had been using Careprost, an eye drop product that was recommended to her by a friend she knows.

I was mostly impressed because they looked so natural on her, which is why I was surprised to find out that they were. They were not attached in any way at all. All she does is use eye drops, and those thick luscious lashes are the result.…

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health

Depression in Pregnancy May Raise Risk of Childhood Asthma

A mother’s psychological distress during pregnancy may increase the risk for asthma in her child, a new study suggests.

Researchers had the parents of 4,231 children fill out well-validated questionnaires on psychological stress in the second trimester of pregnancy, and again three years later. The mothers also completed questionnaires at two and six months after giving birth. The study, in the journal Thorax, found that 362 of the mothers and 167 of the fathers had clinically significant psychological distress during the mothers’ pregnancies.

When the children were 10 years old, parents reported whether their child had ever been diagnosed with asthma. As an extra measure, the researchers tested the children using forced expiratory volume, or FEV, a standard clinical test of lung function.

After controlling for age, smoking during pregnancy, body mass index, a history of asthma and other factors, they found that maternal depression and anxiety during pregnancy was significantly associated with both diagnoses of asthma and poorer lung function in their children. There was no association between childhood asthma and parents’ psychological distress in the years after pregnancy, and no association with paternal psychological stress at any time.

“Of course, this could be only one of many causes of asthma,” said the lead author, Dr. Evelien R. van Meel of Erasmus University in Rotterdam, “but we corrected for many confounders, and we saw the effect only in mothers. This seems to suggest that there’s something going on in the uterus. But this is an observational study, and we can’t say that it’s a causal effect.”

Source Article

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health

Why Running Won’t Ruin Your Knees

They also tested two additional theoretical situations. For one, the researchers programmed in the possibility that people’s knee cartilage would slightly repair itself after repeated small damage from walking or running — but not otherwise change. And for the last scenario, they presumed that the cartilage would actively remodel itself and adapt to the demands of moving, growing thicker and stronger, much as muscle does when we exercise.

The models’ final results were eye-opening. According to the simulations, daily walkers faced about a 36 percent chance of developing arthritis by the age of 55, if the model did not include the possibility of the knee cartilage adapting or repairing itself. That risk dropped to about 13 percent if cartilage were assumed to be able to repair or adapt, which is about what studies predict to be the real-world arthritis risk for otherwise healthy people.

The numbers for running were more worrisome. When the model assumed cartilage cannot change, the runners’ risk of eventual arthritis was a whopping 98 percent, declining only to 95 percent if the model factored in the possibility of cartilage repair. In effect, according to this scenario, the damage to cartilage from frequent running would overwhelm any ability of the tissue to fix itself.

But if the model included the likelihood of the cartilage actively adapting — growing thicker and cushier — when people ran, the odds of runners developing arthritis fell to about 13 percent, the same as for healthy walkers.

What these results suggest is that cartilage is malleable, Dr. Ross says. It must be able to sense the strains and slight damage from running and rebuild itself, becoming stronger. In this scenario, running bolsters cartilage health.

Modeled results like these are theoretical, though, and limited. They do not explain how cartilage remodels itself without a blood supply or if genetics, nutrition, body weight, knee injuries and other factors affect individual arthritis risks. Such models also do not tell us if different distances, speeds or running forms would alter the outcomes. To learn more, we will need direct measures of molecular and other changes in living human cartilage after running, Dr. Miller says, but such tests are difficult.

Still, this study may quiet some runners’ qualms — and those of their families and friends. “It looks like running is unlikely to cause knee arthritis by wearing out cartilage,” Dr. Ross says.

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health

Spiraling healthcare costs of wildfire smoke in California

The annual cost of smoke-related hospitalizations in the state may have quadrupled between 2012 and 2018, according to new research. The costs of this year’s wildfires are likely to be even higher.

According to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, since the start of 2020, there have been more than 8,500 wildfires across the state, incinerating more than 4.1 million acres of land.

At the time of writing, 6 of the 20 largest wildfires in the state’s history have occurred in 2020, including the largest on record, known as the August Complex, which has been burning since the middle of August.

Wildfires release large amounts of particulate matter (PM) and toxic gases, such as carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides.

Smoke particles that are 2.5 microns or smaller in size, known as PM2.5, are carried long distances by the wind. Their small size means that they are breathed deep into the lungs, where they have a wide range of effects on human health.

In addition to the severe harms to health and well-being, there are also financial costs.

Daniel Cullen, who recently gained his Ph.D. in health economics from the University of California Santa Barbara, has estimated the annual healthcare costs of wildfires in the state between 2012 and 2018 in terms of hospitalizations for respiratory and circulatory illnesses.

As part of research for his doctoral thesis, he calculated that the cost may have increased as much as fourfold over this period, from around $88 million in 2012 to $348 million in 2018.

This year is likely to be the worst on record, says Cullen, but given how extraordinary the 2020 wildfire season has been thus far, it is difficult to predict exactly how bad it will be. “When a big county like San Francisco is covered in smoke for 2 months, it is hard to say what is going to be the effect,” he says.

Cullen believes the costs of smoke exposure will continue to rise in coming decades as climate change increases the size, frequency, and intensity of wildfires.

“These healthcare costs need to be accounted for when we are thinking about the costs of climate change,” he says.

Cullen used data from California’s Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development regarding hospital admissions for respiratory and circulatory illnesses between 2012 and 2018.

To investigate possible relationships with smoke exposure, he correlated these admissions with satellite data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Hazard Mapping System Fire and Smoke Product. This tracks wildfire smoke plumes across the United States.

To account for other variables that could affect admissions, Cullen compared each county with itself for the same month in different years. This allowed him to calculate the increased number of admissions that were directly caused by wildfire smoke.

“Using this year to year variation in whether a specific area was exposed to wildfire smoke at a specific point in time, I am able to identify the causal impact of wildfire smoke exposure,” he writes.

He estimates

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health

These factors make it more likely you’ll suffer longterm

Blood collection specialist Niilo Juntunen removes the IV from recovered coronavirus patient Monica Jacobs as she finishes donating convalescent plasma at the Central Seattle Donor Center of Bloodworks Northwest during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) global outbreak, in Seattle, Washington, September 2, 2020.

Lindsey Wasson | Reuters

A new study has identified the main factors that make it more likely that patients will suffer long term from the coronavirus.

“Long Covid” is the term given to people who had a confirmed (or suspected) coronavirus case and who recover from the initial infection but continue to suffer from a wide range of symptoms, from shortness of breath and migraines to chronic fatigue.

A new analysis by researchers at King’s College London, using data from the COVID Symptom Study app, shows “that one in 20 people with Covid-19 are likely to suffer symptoms for 8 weeks or more.”  

The study, published on Wednesday, looked at data from 4,182 users of the COVID Symptom Study app who had tested positive for the virus, and had been consistently logging their health.

The team found that older or overweight people, women, those with asthma and those with a greater number of different symptoms in the first week of their illness were more likely to develop “long Covid.”

Risk factors

Delving into the risk factors more closely, the study by King’s researchers found that long Covid affects around 10% of 18-49 year olds who become unwell with Covid-19, with the percentage of people affected rising to 22% for the over-70s.

Weight also plays a role, with it affecting people with a slightly higher average BMI (body mass index).

Women were much more likely to suffer from long Covid than men (14.5% compared with 9.5%), but only in the younger age group.

The researchers also found that people reporting a wide range of initial symptoms were more likely to develop long Covid, as were people with asthma, although there were no clear links to any other underlying health conditions.

As for the commonly reported symptoms of long Covid, the research identified two main symptom groupings; One was dominated by respiratory symptoms such as a cough and shortness of breath, fatigue and headaches.

The second grouping “was clearly multi-system, affecting many parts of the body, including the brain, gut and heart,” King’s noted.

Predictive model

The researchers have now used these findings, which are due to be published as a pre-print on Medrxiv (distributes unpublished eprints about health sciences) and have not yet been peer-reviewed, to develop a model that can predict who is most at risk of long Covid by looking at an individual’s age, gender, and count of early symptoms.

The lead researchers, Dr. Claire Steves and Professor Tim Spector, said the research could be used to help target early interventions and research aimed at preventing and treating long Covid.

“It’s important we use the knowledge we have gained from the first wave in the pandemic to reduce the long-term impact of the second,” Steves, a clinical

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health

Unconscious Bias Crops Up In Health Care, Even During A Pandemic : Shots

Karla Monterroso says after going to Alameda Hospital in May with a very accelerated heart rate, very low blood pressure and cycling oxygen levels, her entire experience was one of being punished for being ‘insubordinate.’

Kenneth Eke/Code2040


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Karla Monterroso says after going to Alameda Hospital in May with a very accelerated heart rate, very low blood pressure and cycling oxygen levels, her entire experience was one of being punished for being ‘insubordinate.’

Kenneth Eke/Code2040

In mid-March, Karla Monterroso flew home to Alameda, Calif. after a hiking trip in Utah’s Zion National Park. Four days later she began to develop a bad, dry cough. Her lungs felt sticky.

The fevers that persisted for the next nine weeks grew so high — 100.4, 101.2, 101.7, 102.3 — that on the worst night, she was in the shower on all fours, ice cold water running down her back, willing her temperature to go down.

“That night I had written down in a journal, letters to everyone I’m close to, the things I wanted them to know in case I died,” she remembers.

Then came a new batch of symptoms in the second month, headaches and shooting pains in her legs and abdomen that made her worry she could be at risk for the blood clots and strokes that other COVID-19 patients in their thirties were starting to report.

But still, she wasn’t sure if she should go to the hospital.

“As women of color, you get questioned a lot about your emotions and the truth of your physical state. You get called an exaggerator a lot throughout the course of your life,” says Monterroso, who is Latina. “So there was this weird, ‘I don’t want to go and use resources for nothing’ feeling.”

It took four friends to convince her that she needed to call 911.

But what happened in the emergency room at Alameda Hospital only confirmed her worst fears.

At nearly every turn during her emergency room visit, providers dismissed her symptoms and concerns, Monterroso says. Her low blood pressure? That’s a false reading. Her cycling oxygen levels? The machine’s wrong. The shooting pains in her leg? Probably just a cyst.

“The doctor came in and said, ‘I don’t think that much is happening here. I think we can send you home,'” Monterroso recalls.

Her experiences in the medical system, she reasons, are part of why people of color are disproportionately affected by the coronavirus. She says it is not just because they’re more likely to have front-line jobs that expose them to the virus, and the underlying health conditions that can lead to a more serious COVID-19 infection.

“That is certainly part of it, but the other part is the lack of value people see in our lives,” Monterroso wrote in a Twitter thread detailing her experience.

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medicine

It’s time to map medicine’s sexual and gender harassment iceberg

Gender harassment happens every day in health care organizations, academic medicine, research labs, and other corners of the science, technology, engineering, and math worlds. It’s largely hidden — except to those experiencing it — unlike its more egregious counterpart, sexual harassment, which often makes headlines.

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) describe gender harassment as “verbal and nonverbal behaviors that convey hostility, objectification, exclusion, or second-class status.” It undermines women, exhausts and demoralizes them, and strips them of their motivation, eventually driving them out of the workforce.

As women physicians working in academic medicine, we know this firsthand.

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With five of our colleagues, we filed a federal lawsuit in 2019 alleging sex, age, and race discrimination by Mount Sinai Health System and four of its male employees, including the dean of the medical school. (Editor’s note: All the documents are public, and the defendants have denied any wrongdoing.)

As our complaint details, we left Mount Sinai emotionally and psychologically scarred after being demeaned by male leadership, denied promotions, underpaid compared to male colleagues, and systematically gaslit by internal reporting structures that were meant to protect us. We were demoted from leadership positions and assigned menial tasks, such as managing a Mailchimp subscription list. Some of us were ignored and frozen out of important work streams, and were forbidden to meet alone with longtime colleagues and mentors. Members of our group were referred to as “bitches” and “cunts” by our colleagues without any repercussions. Those are just a few of the forms of mistreatment we endured at Mount Sinai’s Arnhold Institute for Global Health.

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We believed that our hard work and years of service to the institution would protect us and allow us to be measured on our merits. Instead we struck the “iceberg of sexual harassment,” and it sank our careers.

A 2018 NASEM report on sexual harassment in academic sciences, engineering, and medicine introduced the analogy of an iceberg to describe harassment in these fields. Sexual assault and coercion are the visible and appalling tip of the iceberg. People recognize their severity and the personal damage they wreak, the media often cover these stories, and perpetrators are sometimes held accountable. Gender harassment, in contrast is the huge mass below the surface, largely unseen but nonetheless ruinous.

iceberg_infographic harassment
National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

Women in health care rarely report harassment due to the risk of retaliation. Compounding this, the internal systems that should assist employees all too often make protecting perpetrators and institutional reputations their top priority. Our meetings with Mount Sinai human resources representatives were humiliating and degrading, providing neither safety nor protection, as we recount in our complaint. In one meeting, they referred to a book on “why women think they are being discriminated against when they are not.” Because of these systemic failures, the legal route was our only resort.

Since filing our lawsuit, we are seeing the enormity of the iceberg. Scores of doctors, nurses, staff, and medical students

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health

Trump’s broadsides against science put GOP governors in a bind

“These numbers will not change unless we change,” DeWine said Tuesday. “By more of us wearing masks, by more of us avoiding situations where there can be spread and just really being careful, we can turn this heat down and get back to a simmer of this virus instead of the flame that’s coming up.”

Tennessee Republican Gov. Bill Lee on Tuesday announced a new statewide ad campaign promoting face coverings, saying wearing a mask is the only way people can safely return to their routines. The number of Covid patients in the state’s intensive care units is up 40 percent since Oct. 1.

Mississippi GOP Gov. Tate Reeves on Monday said that hospitals in his state must be able to reserve at least 10 percent of their beds for coronavirus patients or cancel elective procedures. He also issued a mask mandate and limited indoor gatherings to 10 people and outdoor gatherings to 50 people in nine counties.

“We’re trying to prevent so many individuals from getting the virus at once that our health care system cannot respond,” Reeves said.

The push by Republican governors whose states are in danger of being overrun by a new wave of infections and hospitalizations reflects the disconnect between politicians who are fighting the virus’ real effects on the ground and Trump’s reelection campaign, which is trying to project optimism that the country is turning the corner on infections, even though the statistics don’t back him up.

Hospitals in Utah and Wisconsin are at or near capacity, while facilities in Texas and Indiana battle medical staff shortages. Nationally, the number of people hospitalized with Covid-19 has climbed 20 percent in the two weeks since Trump left Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after contracting the virus. And the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported on Tuesday that the pandemic has resulted in 299,000 excess deaths from late January to Oct. 3 — a toll members of Trump’s own administration say is sure to sharply increase.

“We’re going straight up again with the number of cases happening each day,” NIH Director Francis Collins warned in an NPR interview Tuesday. “Hospitalizations are up … and I’m afraid, inevitably, that is going to result in an increase in deaths, because that’s what happens every time with about a two- or three-week delay.”

But with less than two weeks until the election, the president has insisted that coronavirus concerns are exaggerated, called the government’s leading infectious disease expert Anthony Fauci an “idiot” and a “disaster” and relied more heavily on Scott Atlas — a coronavirus task force member who backs protecting vulnerable populations while loosening nearly all Covid-related restrictions and letting the virus spread unfettered among healthy people.

Collins said Tuesday that Trump has also stopped meeting with the rest of the task force even as cases and hospitalizations surge and as public health experts warn that the colder weather and approaching holiday season will send more Americans indoors, where the virus more easily spreads.

Trump’s message

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health

Philips and Marienhospital Stuttgart sign 10-year strategic partnership to improve patient care and efficiency

Marienhospital Stuttgart

October 21, 2020

  • Long-term agreement guarantees access to state-of-the-art solutions, controls costs, and ensures security of future investment

  • Fully-integrated approach deploying Philips’ digital healthcare solutions across multiple departments to enhance the experience of Marienhospital Stuttgart’s patient and staff

Amsterdam, the Netherlands and Stuttgart, Germany – Royal Philips (NYSE: PHG, AEX: PHIA), a global leader in health technology, and Marienhospital Stuttgart (Germany) today signed a 10-year strategic partnership agreement to expand world-class medicine at the hospital and provide integrated patient care. The project will include renewal and ongoing development of the hospital’s diagnostic imaging equipment and associated IT systems, digitization of its pathology department, and enhancement of the hospital’s emergency medicine capabilities.

Rather than treating each of these improvement areas as a separate exercise, Philips and Marienhospital Stuttgart will integrate them into connected patient care and optimized efficiency solutions. This will involve analysis of the hospital’s current treatment structures and pathways to enhance the overall quality of the hospital’s structures, processes and results, while also identifying potential cost savings. By jointly developing needs-based technology solutions, Marienhospital Stuttgart will be able to better plan its costs and ensure investment security in all areas.

“Due to the long-term nature of our partnership with Philips, our hospital will not only actively participate in future technological advances in healthcare, but also become a leader,” said Markus Mord, Managing Director of Marienhospital Stuttgart. “It will enable us to offer our patients diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that consistently meet the latest standards. We live medicine and always focus on the well-being of our patients.”

“As a solution provider, we specialize in partnering with our customers to provide integrated care concepts that enhance treatment pathways for their patients,” said Peter Vullinghs, Managing Director Philips DACH. “With new, highly innovative approaches, we will help to enhance the quality of medical care for the benefit of the patient across the board. We look forward to many years of mutual cooperation with Marienhospital Stuttgart.”

Reliable diagnosis through digital pathology
A core element of the collaboration is redesign of the hospital’s pathology department workflow, replacing conventional microscopes and glass slides with Philips’ high-performance digital pathology slide scanners and computer workstations. This will allow slide images to be managed, displayed, analyzed and discussed with clinical colleagues – for example, during tumor boards for the diagnosis and treatment of cancers. The ability to share slide images will also enable virtual consultations with experts from other hospitals. Competence networks like this combine the experience of doctors working in the clinic with the knowledge of their research colleagues, speeding up right-first-time diagnosis and the initiation of therapy.

Radiology for current and future needs
Reflecting the holistic nature of the partnership model, Philips will also help to analyze and redefine Marienhospital Stuttgart’s radiology procedures, processes and IT systems, as well as coordinating equipment renewal and expansion. Under the terms of the agreement, Philips will be responsible for the procurement, installation, maintenance (including updates and upgrades) and servicing of all large radiology equipment, with

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health

US is nearing ‘rapid acceleration’ of Covid-19 cases, expert warns, as daily infections top 60,000

A leading health expert says US Covid-19 cases will begin to rapidly accelerate in a week as the country topped 60,000 new infections Tuesday — triple what the daily average was back in June, when restrictions had begun to ease.



a car parked in a parking lot: People in cars wait in line for Covid-19 testing in Reading, Pennsylvania, on Tuesday morning, October 13.


© Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle/Getty Images
People in cars wait in line for Covid-19 testing in Reading, Pennsylvania, on Tuesday morning, October 13.

The prediction comes after several state leaders reimposed some measures to help curb the spread of the virus, fueled by small gatherings increasingly moving indoors with the colder weather, as well as other factors such as college and school reopenings. The national seven-day case average has increased at least 18% since the previous week and is now a staggering 61% higher than what it was five weeks ago. And as multiple experts have warned, things will likely get worse before they get better.

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“It’s going to be a difficult fall and winter,” Dr. Scott Gottlieb, former commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration, told CNBC Monday. “I think we’re about two or three weeks behind Europe — so we’re about a week away from starting to enter a period where we’re going to see a rapid acceleration in cases.”

The difference is many European countries were able to suppress their numbers of new cases over the summer, but the US entered the fall season with a relatively high baseline average of new infections — something experts warned wouldn’t help in containing another surge of cases. Dr. Anthony Fauci said earlier this week European Union countries were able to bring their baseline down because of strict and stringent lockdowns, adding the US did not “shut down nearly as much as our colleagues in Italy and Spain.”

Ahead of bleak outlooks of the coming weeks, hospitalizations in the US have also began to rise, with more than 39,000 Covid-19 patients nationwide, according to the COVID Tracking Project.

“We’re seeing hospitalizations go up in 42 states right now, cases are going up in 45 states, and there really is no backstop,” Gottlieb said. “This fall and winter season is when the coronavirus is going to want to spread.”

‘Get ready:’ 70,000 new infections daily

At least 26 US states are reporting more new Covid-19 cases than the previous week, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. And no states are trending in the right direction, according to the data.

By next week or the week after that, the US could be recording up to 70,000 new cases daily, Dr. Peter Hotez, dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine, said Tuesday. And the numbers could keep rising after that, he said.

“Look out for your mental health, because the normal response to this is people are going to get sad and upset, and maybe even depressed, so have access to mental health counseling,” Hotez said. “In other words, put those belts and suspenders in and get ready.”

Video: Infectious diseases expert

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medicine

Over The Moon: How Margaret Cho helped Ken Jeong choose comedy over medicine

Ken Jeong has had many scene-stealing roles in his second career, including that star-making turn in The Hangover trilogy and as the anarchic Chang in Community.

And while many know that he was a real-life doctor specialising in internal medicine while doing stand-up comedy on the side before choosing acting full-time in 2006, what they may not know is that it was fellow Asian-American comic Margaret Cho who really encouraged him.

“I was inspired by Margaret. I got my start in comedy because of Margaret,” Jeong told news.com.au. “When I was in medical school and being her opening act at university inspired me to do this full-time. I would always ask Margaret, ‘Should I quit being a doctor? Should I quit medicine?’.

“I was so tortured, and I know I annoyed her. And she was so patient with me and so loving. It was just like a sibling – and it got me through my own internal confidence crises.

“Margaret really is a pioneer in so many ways. Every Asian-American comedian owes a debt of gratitude to Margaret. Also, when I developed my own show, Dr Ken, I had Margaret as my character’s sister for a reason.”

Jeong and Cho reunite this week in Netflix movie Over The Moon, an animated film which tells a modern story based on an ancient Chinese legend about moon goddess Chang’e and her significance to Chinese cultures that celebrate the Mid-Autumn Festival.

Ken Jeong used to be a doctor before he turned to acting
media_cameraKen Jeong used to be a doctor before he turned to acting
Margaret Cho has been performing comedy since the early 1990s
media_cameraMargaret Cho has been performing comedy since the early 1990s

Jeong voices a mythical moon creature named Gobi, who plays guide to young heroine Fei Fei while Cho voices one of Fei Fei’s aunts.

The film drops on Netflix this week and also features the voice talents of John Cho, Philippa Soo, Sandra Oh, Kimiko Glenn and newcomer Cathy Yan.

Over The Moon is an often strange, often tender and often musical movie pitched at families, but for the Asian diaspora community, it’ll have extra resonance.

Cho told news.com.au that she signed on for the role because it was “a beautiful story” that moved her while Jeong identified the film as part of a wave of change when it comes to Asian-American representation in Hollywood.

“I think the script and the story was so novel, and then also finding it’s an all Asian-American cast – like my dear friend Margaret and then John Cho, Phillipa Soo from Hamilton, Cathy Yan who really is a centrepiece of this movie,” Jeong said. “So you have this incredible Asian-American talent and on the heels of Crazy Rich Asians, Searching, Tigertail and Always Be My Maybe, there is like a wave. And it’s really nice to have that wave extend to the world of animation.”

RELATED: Rose Matafeo’s teenage geek-out over future co-star

Cho, who has been steadily working for almost 30 years, has been part of that wave when it was barely a trickle. She starred

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