The Symptoms of a Ruptured Ovarian Cyst

Although most ovarian cysts (functional [fluid filled]) tend to show little or no noticeable symptoms of being present at first (a vast part of the female population tend to suffer from ovarian cysts), when one ruptures, things can quickly change (they become decidedly uncomfortable [even intolerable]). An ovarian cyst rupture can occur in just about any woman, of any age, who suffers from them.

There are two different types of functional ovarian cysts that a woman can suffer from: follicular, and luteal (both can keep growing until they are treated).

1. Follicular cysts – tend to occur when one of the sacs on the ovary does not release an egg, causing it to swell-up with fluid.

2. Luteal cysts – tend to occur when one of the sacs on the ovary releases an egg, but re-seals quickly after-wards causing it to swell-up with fluid.

Symptoms of the existence, and the rupture of an ovarian cyst:

  • Pelvic aches and pains, generally in the lower abdomen, back, and upper legs which usually occurs during the mid-part of the menstrual cycle.
  • An either delayed or inhibited start to the menstrual cycle (often several days or more).
  • An abnormal uterine bleeding (often called breakout bleeding) that usually occurs between normal menstrual periods.
  • Severe pain (often sudden), that may be accompanied with bloating, the feeling of light-headedness, nausea and vomiting (an indication that either a rupture has taken place, or a cyst is twisted).
  • Pain during or after sexual intercourse (an indication that either a rupture has taken place, or a cyst is twisted).
  • Painful bowel movements, and pain during urination (an indication that either a rupture has taken place, or a cyst is twisted).
  • Anemia, chills, fatigue, fever, and muscle weakness may also be present.
  • Heavy blood-loss can result during and after a ruptured cyst has taken place if medical attention is not received.

Often ovarian cysts are only diagnosed during a routine pelvic examination, and where a pelvic ultrasound will usually follow to indicate whether the cyst is either functional, or is solid (often cancerous). However, more often than not, functional cysts tend to clear-up on their own (when not the case, medical treatment should be sought). The most common treatments include both hormone treatment, and surgical removal. However, two alternative treatments which may also be used are: homeopathy, and Chinese medicine (both have shown an excellent degree of success).