workout

health

The low impact workout that anyone can do

Watch: 1Sculpt’s Jeannine and Nathalie lead a low impact workout as part of a six-part workout series

Not every workout has to be 100 miles per hour, and this one takes it down a gear, giving you a low impact routine that’s great if you have an injury – or you don’t want to annoy the downstairs neighbours!

Twin sisters, Jeannine and Nathalie have over 20 years of experience between them and they’re keen for everyone to experience their love of working out! Not everyone loves a high-energy HIIT workout however, which is where their impact workout comes in.

“You’re staying close to the ground, but you’re still working your total body,” explains Jeannine.

She continues: “Low impact workouts are effective and great for those who want to avoid putting stress on to their joints.”

Read more: How to get up and exercise outdoors – even when it’s cold, dark and wet

Great for all fitness levels, the workout contains four exercises. Each exercise is just 30 seconds long, followed by a 25-second break.

If injury is the reason you’ve been avoiding high impact classes, the twins also suggest trying to incorporate other low-impact exercise into your schedule

“Exercise doesn’t have to be high impact and jumping,” says Nathalie.

“Walking or cycling are great low impact exercise. We often jump in the car for short journeys – try switching this up and walk instead. Or maybe plan a daily walk, it doesn’t have to be long.”

Read more: Perrie Edwards’ personal trainer reveals the exercise routine that boosted her confidence

While many of us have started working out at home since the pandemic hit, it can be hard to motivate yourself if you’re normally used to joining an exercise classes or going to the gym.

Natalie suggests, if the local rules around COVID-19 in your area allow, to grab a partner as they can be really motivating!

“Working out together makes it so much more fun and – dare we say – competitive!” she says.  

“You have a buddy to get though the parts of the workout that you may have given up if on your own – it gives you that extra boost.”

One study by Kansas State University found that those people who exercised with a buddy actually increased their workout time and intensity by a whopping 200%!

Read more: More people are using exercise to help manage their mental health

The twins, who run 1Sculpt studio, have had to adapt their business during the pandemic to offer online classes. This last few months has taught them that routine is essential when it comes to a home workout.

“The one thing that is most important is routine – nail that and your half-way there,” they wrote on their Instagram account.

“You don’t have to have loads of equipment or lots of space to get that workout in. If anything, the last six months has taught us is that a chair, some bottles of water and using

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fitness

Give your brain the ultimate workout with this science-backed cognitive-fitness app

 

The Hill may be compensated and/or receive an affiliate commission if you buy through our links.

Brain training exercises are hardly new—you’ve likely been finding ways to bolster your cognitive skills your whole life without realizing it, whether through crossword puzzles, Sudoku, or card games. What is relatively new, however, is having the ability to play scientifically-backed brain training games directly on your cellphone.

Among some of the most popular digital brain training solutions is CogniFit, an app that provides engaging content users can access on their iPhones, tablets, Android devices, or computers. CogniFit is recognized as a global leader in the Cognitive Assessment and Training Market, boasting games, puzzles, assessments, and teasers that are backed by scientific patented technology. The goal of these short, personalized activities is to improve several cognitive functions, including perception, concentration, memory, and hand-eye coordination, as well as improve your brain plasticity. 

More than that, the app will measure, train, and monitor your cognitive skills with each of these programs. And along the way, users will receive real-time feedback that will help them track their performance and compare these results to a cohort of their peers. 

Currently, CogniFit has a solid 4.4-star rating on both the App Store and Google Play Store from thousands of users. As one current subscriber notes, CogniFit offers a variety of “Fun games to keep you spry in the mind! It really does challenge you to focus…” 

If you are looking to upgrade your current brain exercises from the Sunday crossword puzzle to a personalized brain teaser designed for your age group and skillsets, maybe it is time you try out CogniFit, too. Currently, a one-year subscription is 58% off, making it just $49.99. 

Prices subject to change.

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fitness

Future raises $24M Series B for its $150/mo workout coaching app amid at-home fitness boom

With thousands of gyms across the country forced to close during the pandemic, there’s been an unprecedented opportunity for fitness companies pitching an at-home solution. This moment has propelled public companies like Peloton to stratospheric highs — its market cap is about to eclipse $40 billion — but it has also pushed venture capitalists toward plenty of deals in the fitness space.

Future launched with a bold sell for consumers: a $150 per month subscription app that virtually teamed users with a real-life fitness coach. Leaning on the health-tracking capabilities of the Apple Watch, the startup has been aiming to build a platform that teams motivation, accountability and fitness insights.



graphical user interface


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Image via Future

Close to 18 months after announcing a Series A led by Kleiner Perkins, the startup tells TechCrunch they’ve closed a $24 million Series B led by Trustbridge Partners, with Caffeinated Capital and Kleiner Perkins participating again.

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Amid the at-home fitness boom, Future has seen major growth of its own. CEO Rishi Mandal says that the company’s growth rate has tripled in recent months as thousands of gyms closed their doors. He says shelter-in-place has merely accelerated an ongoing shift toward tech-forward fitness services that can help busy users find time during their day to exercise.

The operating thesis of the company is that modern life is inherently crazy not just during pandemic times but in normal times,” Mandal says. “The idea of having a set routine is a complete fallacy.”

At $149 per month, Future isn’t aiming for mass market appeal the same way other digital fitness programs being produced by Peloton, Fitbit or Apple are. It seems to be more squarely aimed at users who could be a candidate for getting a personal trainer but might not be ready to make the investment or don’t need the guided instruction so much as they need general guidelines and some accountability.

As the startup closes on more funding, the team has big goals to expand its network. Mandal aims to have 1,000 coaches on the Future platform by this time next year. Reaching new scales could give the service a chance to tackle new challenges. Mandal sees opportunities for Future to expand its coaching services beyond fitness as it grows, “There’s a real opportunity to help people with all aspects of their health.”

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Fitness tech company JAXJOX raises $10M as it gets ready to ship AI-enabled workout system

The JAXJOX InteractiveStudio exercise system. (JAXJOX Photo)

JAXJOX, the Redmond, Wash.-based fitness technology company, has raised $10 million in a new funding round to help pay for the research and development of its signature InteractiveStudio workout equipment.

The Series A round included investors Dowgate Capital Ltd. and entrepreneur Nigel Wray, and brings total funding to $17 million for the 3-year-old company.

JAXJOX is getting set to release its InteractiveStudio smart gym, a home fitness system that includes digitally adjustable weights, AI-enabled connected tech built into the equipment, and live and on-demand classes.

With connected tech built into individual pieces of free-weight equipment, such as a smart kettlebell, users don’t have to stand a certain distance from a screen to have form and motion tracked.

“By monitoring performance metrics and using AI, we can give users a more holistic view of their health and provide recommendations on improving their wellbeing,” founder and CEO Stephen Owusu said in a news release. “We believe that, for users, tracking power generated while lifting will become as important as tracking your heart rate while running.”

The InteractiveStudio is available for pre-order on the JAXJOX website and retails for $2,199 with a $39 monthly subscription. The system will also sell as part of an exclusive retail partnership this fall with Best Buy.

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Ontario fitness chains ask members from COVID-19 hotspots to not travel to other regions to workout



a sign on the side of a building: People lined up outside of an LA Fitness in Milton


© Thebishk/Twitter
People lined up outside of an LA Fitness in Milton

Prominent fitness chains in Ontario are asking for people residing in COVID-19 hotspots to stop travelling to other jurisdictions to workout.

The Ontario government moved Toronto, Peel and Ottawa back into modified versions of Stage 2 amid a rise in coronavirus cases, which meant gyms would be closed for 28 days effective last Saturday at 12:01 a.m.

Read more: Toronto, Peel Region move into Stage 2 of province’s reopening plan Wednesday

Now, LA Fitness and Goodlife Fitness have released statements telling members from those three regions to not try to workout in other non-hotspot locations after multiple videos surfaced online of lineups outside certain locations.

“Following the travel recommendations provided by the Ontario Government, GoodLife is asking Members from Ottawa, Peel and Toronto not to visit other GoodLife Clubs in regions outside of their own during this temporary closure,” a statement from Goodlife Fitness read on Thursday.

“All Members in these regions were automatically placed on freeze on Saturday, October 10, and they are not permitted to book workouts at Clubs in surrounding regions using the GoodLife App or Member Portal.”

A statement from LA Fitness read: “We don’t support or encourage members from Higher Transmission Areas where our clubs have been closed to use our clubs that are open in other areas. In response to these concerns, we have sent the clarifying email noted below to the affected members on October 14, and posted this identical message at the open clubs.”

Read more: Coronavirus: What you can and can’t do in Toronto, Peel and Ottawa under Ontario’s modified stage 2

Ontario Health Minister Christine Elliott said people who travel to other locations are only adding to the problem.

“If we have people traveling around outside of their own home area to get some of these services, that’s going to only add to to our numbers and add to the problem. So please stay where you are. Workout at home if you’re able to.”

Premier Doug Ford warned if the situation continues, the government might have to clamp down on other areas.

“If the spread continues, yes, the answer is yes. But again, we can’t police 14 and a half million people,” he said at his daily press conference, however, he did say for the most part, people have been following the new rules.

“Everyone’s pitched in. Everyone’s helped out. Everyone’s followed, for the most part, the guidelines and protocols. So that’s all we’re asking.”

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