Woman

health

Texas woman died of covid-19 on a Spirit Airlines flight from Las Vegas

The woman has not been identified publicly, but the Dallas County Judge’s Office, which first disclosed her death, said she was in her 30s and had an underlying medical condition.

Airport managers in Albuquerque did not learn until later that the woman had covid-19, so the case was handled as a typical medical diversion, Kitts said. Officials in Dallas County added the woman to their virus death toll on Sunday.

“She expired on an interstate airline flight, and did have underlying high risk health conditions,” the county said in a new release updating its tally.

Erik Hofmeyer, a spokesman for Spirit, offered the airline’s condolences to the woman’s family and friends. He said that the airline remains confident in its protocols for handling coronavirus cases and that it works with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on any contact-tracing requests.

“Our Flight Attendants have in-depth training to respond to medical emergencies and utilize several resources, including communicating with our designated on-call medical professionals on the ground, using onboard medical kits and personal protective equipment, and receiving assistance from credentialed medical personnel traveling on the flight,” Hofmeyer said.

It’s unknown how many people where on the flight or whether they were notified that they might have been exposed to the virus.

The CDC has said it has investigated about 1,600 cases of people who traveled while they posed a risk of spreading the coronavirus, identifying 11,000 people who were potentially exposed. It wasn’t immediately clear whether the agency investigated the case of the woman who died on the Spirit flight.

Kitts said the New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator, which handles unusual deaths in the state, responded to the airport. The office could not be reached to comment.

Officials in Dallas initially said the woman died in Arizona, a detail that was widely reported, before confirming that she actually died in New Mexico.

Although it appears to be an extreme case, the woman’s death was disclosed as airlines continue to try to convince potential passengers that flying is safe during the pandemic. Trade organizations have stressed that there have not been confirmed cases of people catching the virus on planes in the United States and that only a few cases have been documented globally.

Nevertheless, passenger numbers continue to be down considerably from normal times as businesses curtail travel and some states impose quarantine requirements on travelers.

Source Article

Read More
health

Texas woman died of COVID-19 while on board a plane from Arizona to Texas, officials say

A Texas woman died of COVID-19 while on board a plane from Arizona to Texas, officials said Sunday.

The woman, in her 30s, had difficulty breathing before the plane took off on July 25, according to Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.

“They tried to give her oxygen,” Jenkins said during a briefing. “It was not successful. She died on the jetway.”

READ ALSO: ‘Homophobic tactics’: Flyer for NEISD candidate puts quotation marks around opponent’s gay marriage

County officials knew a Garland resident had died in July, Jenkins told WFAA, but only recently received an autopsy report from an Arizona medical examiner that listed the virus as the cause of death.


“We don’t know a whole lot,” Jenkins said. “We may not know if she was aware she was sick.”

The woman, who has not been identified, had underlying high risk health conditions, according to a news release.

Jenkins said he did not have information on which airline the woman was traveling with, WFAA reported.

On Monday, Dallas officials announced 382 new coronavirus cases, bringing the total to 90,318 confirmed cases and 1,085 deaths.

Across the state, 2,273 cases and eight new deaths were reported, for a total of 828,527 cases and 17,022 deaths. As of Monday, 4,319 Texans were hospitalized for the coronavirus.

Source Article

Read More
health

This pregnant woman ran a mile in less than 6 minutes 1 week before her due date

A 28-year-old pregnant woman who ran a mile in less than six minutes is showing that pregnancy has no limits.

Makenna Myler, who runs with the Valor Track Club in Orange County, California, ran one mile last week in five minutes and 25 seconds, and she did it while nine months pregnant.

Her husband, Mike, captured the feat on video and shared it on TikTok, where it has gone viral with tens of thousands of likes, comments and shares.

“I think pregnancy is a beautiful thing and it’s not an injury or a sickness, that you’re still really capable,” Myler, who ran track at Brigham Young University, told “Good Morning America.” “I think a lot of women are showing that, that women are capable and that’s what matters.”

Myler said she and her husband, whom she describes as her biggest supporter, jokingly bet each other $100 that she would not finish the mile in under eight minutes, a bet Myler clearly won.

MORE: I breast pumped while running an Ironman race and was floored by the responses online

Myler, whose due date was Oct. 19, said that while her sub-six minute mile is getting attention, she doesn’t want other women to think her training during pregnancy has been a breeze.

“The first trimester I didn’t have that extra weight but I was exhausted and I was probably running slower than I am now,” she said. “I’ve had to listen to my body and really let myself recover and get a workout in if I can, if my body is feeling it, but they’re definitely few and far between.”

Myler added of her approach to workouts, “When people say, ‘What are you going to run this time?’ I say, ‘Whatever my body wants.’ If I don’t want to do it, I’m not going to do it, because pregnancy and my health obviously comes first.”

PHOTO: Makenna Myler, 28, of Heber, Utah, is photographed running during her pregnancy. (Jorge Jabaz/Valor Track Club)
PHOTO: Makenna Myler, 28, of Heber, Utah, is photographed running during her pregnancy. (Jorge Jabaz/Valor Track Club)

And while most women will not run nearly five-minute miles, the workout done by Myler, who has dreams of representing the United States in the Olympics, is a safe one, experts say.

MORE: Supermom stops running during a 106-mile race to breastfeed her son

“For my patients, in general, I tell them that they can continue doing anything that they were doing before pregnancy as long as it remains comfortable and doesn’t cause any pain,” said Dr. Danielle Jones, a board-certified OBGYN in College Station, Texas, who is not involved in Myler’s treatment. “You don’t see it a lot because most people get uncomfortable by the third trimester and aren’t wanting to run a five-minute mile, but there’s definitely people out there who can comfortably continue that in their pregnancy.”

Jones stressed that there are conditions that prevent women from exercising during pregnancy and that women should always consult with their doctors throughout their pregnancies and keep them informed of their exercise routine.

For pregnant women who are

Read More
health

Texas woman died of coronavirus ‘on the jetway’ on flight from Arizona

A Texas woman in her 30s died of Covid-19 while flying home from Arizona this summer, officials said Monday.

Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins told NBC Dallas-Fort Worth that the woman died in July, but that officials just learned of her official cause of death.

“It became difficult for her to breathe, and they tried to give her oxygen,” he told the station. “It was not successful. She died on the jetway.”

The woman, who was from the Dallas suburb of Garland, had underlying health conditions, according to a Dallas County news release. Additional information about her was not immediately available.

The disclosure comes as case counts continued to rise in 25 states, according to a 14-day average maintained by the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center. The data showed that new cases jumped in Texas last week after a dip the week before.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has continued relaxing coronavirus restrictions, with an executive order earlier this month allowing some bars to reopen at half capacity.

Jenkins criticized the move Monday, saying it can make people believe it’s safe to have friends over.

“We keep jumping the gun, and it puts us back in a situation which hurts public health and businesses and schools,” he told NBC Dallas-Fort Worth.

Experts have warned of a possible “third peak” of coronavirus cases as the holidays approach with what Dr. Carlos del Rio, an infectious diseases expert at the Emory University School of Medicine, described as six possible superspreader events.

“We can see a lot of disease happening,” he said.

Source Article

Read More
dentist

Woman files $10M suit against dentist after alleged botched procedure

A clarinetist claims she could literally lose face after an allegedly botched procedure by a Manhattan dentist.

Boja Kragulj, who has performed in orchestras in Philadelphia and New York, claims in a $10 million lawsuit that her face could “prematurely age” because of “irreversible” bone loss from the work of Martha Cortes.

Facing the prospect of double jaw surgery after lifelong dental and breathing problems, Kragulj turned to Cortes in 2013 for an alternative. The dentist, who has an office on Central Park South, treated Kragulj unsuccessfully for years before placing a device called an Anterior Growth Guided Appliance, or AGGA, and controlled arch braces, in the musician’s mouth.

The AGGA was supposed to be a substitute for jaw surgery by stimulating new bone growth, helping to move Kragulj’s teeth and jaw forward and improve her airway. Instead, Kragulj claims in court papers, the device left her in worse shape than before.

AGGA is “unproven [and] not supported by medical knowledge or science,” according to the lawsuit.

Now Kragulj could lose four to six front teeth, and, over time “vertical dimension” — the space between her nose and chin — leading to the early aging of her face, she alleges.

Cortes should have known the AGGA wouldn’t work as advertised and failed to immediately repair it when part of it broke, according to Kragulj’s Manhattan Supreme Court lawsuit.

It’s unclear how the dental disaster impacted the musical career of Kragulj, who is suing Cortes along with others.

Cortes did not respond to a message.

Source Article

Read More