Police

dentist

Andhra police rescue kidnapped Hyderabad dentist, 3 kidnappers escape – india news

Police in Andhra Pradesh’s Anantapur district rescued a Hyderabad-based dentist from kidnappers while they were taking him to Karnataka in a vehicle in the early hours of Wednesday.

Anantapur’s superintendent of police Dr Satya Yesubabu said when the kidnappers’ vehicle was intercepted at Rapthadu village the driver tried to divert the vehicle towards Kanaganapalli.

“But the police surrounded it from all sides. While they overpowered Sanjay, who was driving the vehicle, three others managed to escape into the fields. They could rescue the doctor – B Hussain (57), who was lying in the back seat with his hands and legs tied,” the SP said.

Hussain was kidnapped by five burqa-clad men from his clinic at Bandlaguda Jagir under Rajendranagar police station limits on the outskirts of Hyderabad on Tuesday afternoon when he was getting ready to go home for lunch.

The kidnappers, who were conversing in Marathi, beat up Hussain’s assistant Syed Salman and dumped him in the washroom. They later dragged the doctor into his Toyota Innova vehicle and proceeded towards Shankarpalli.

The SP said the kidnappers first detained Hussain in an undisclosed place till evening. Later, the gang leader handed him to four members of the gang and asked them to take him to Shimoga or Bengaluru in a Mahindra Bolero vehicle.

Meanwhile, Salman, who managed to escape from the clinic, informed Hussain’s family. The dentist’s wife then complained to Rajendranagar police.

“Since Hussain is also into real estate business and made big money, the kidnappers targeted him. They reportedly demanded a ransom of Rs 10 crore through Bitcoins,” Yesubabu said.

Based on the evidence collected, the Rajendranagar police came to the conclusion that the kidnappers had taken Hussain towards Bengaluru. They immediately alerted Anantapur police.

“We deployed special police teams on the national highway and kept a watch on the movements of vehicles coming from Hyderabad. In the early hours, Rapthadu police managed to intercept the vehicle and take it into their possession,” the SP said.

He said Hussain was rescued and was safe. “We have seized the vehicle and a pistol from the accused. We have launched a manhunt for other kidnappers. Investigation is on,” he said.

Andhra Pradesh Director General of Police Gautam Sawang complimented the Anantapur police for their quick action in rescuing the dentist from the kidnappers.

Source Article

Read More
dentist

Kidnapped Hyderabad dentist rescued by Anantapur police

A ransom of ₹10 crore was demanded in bitcoins.

A doctor of Hyderabad-based Kismatpur Dental Hospital, Hussain, who was kidnapped from the hospital on Tuesday afternoon at 1 p.m. was rescued by the Anantapur police near Rapthadu in the early hours of Wednesday.

The alleged motive behind the kidnap was a ransom of ₹10 crore, demanded in bitcoins as the doctor was also a real-estate dealer.

The doctor had injuries on his fingers, face and head. He was handed over to the Hyderabad police.

In all, nine persons were involved in the planned kidnapping of the doctor. A vehicle, with a Maharashtra registration number was used by them.

Rapthadu Sub-Inspector of police P.T. Anjaneyulu, along with his team, intercepted the vehicle at Marur Toll Plaza at 2 a.m. The kidnappers veered the Bolero van towards Bukkacherla village near Kanaganapalli to avoid the checking. The doctor was hidden under clothes and dumped in the rear seat of the van.

After a chase that lasted an hour, the vehicle and one of the kidnappers were located by tracking the mobile location, and the injured doctor was rescued, the Sub-Inspector told The Hindu.

Three of the four involved in the crime fled the scene. Only one of them, identified as Sanjay, was arrested. Hunt is on for the others, who fled into the fields in the dark near Bukkacherla.

According to the victim, he was kidnapped by five unknown persons who had come in burquas to his hospital. He said he was confined in a room in an undisclosed place in Hyderabad till 5 p.m. All spoke the Marathi language, he said. The doctor was handed over to four other persons, who were asked to go to Bengaluru or Shimoga in Karnataka. They began driving from Hyderabad past midnight.

Hyderabad police had alerted the District Superintendent of Police B. Satya Yesu Babu at 5 p.m. on Tuesday about the possible movement of the kidnappers on National Highway No. 44 based on their cell phone locations.

Source Article

Read More
dentist

AP police rescue Hyderabad dentist from kidnappers | Hyderabad News

HYDERABAD: Andhra Pradesh police on Wednesday rescued a dentist at Anantapur from kidnappers after a hot pursuit.
Following the alert by the Telangana police regarding the movement of kidnappers’ vehicle with the victim dentist, Behjaat Hussain, who was abducted from his house in Rajendra Nagar police station limits of Telangana, was rescued. The Ananthapuram police intercepted the kidnappers’ vehicle, saved the victim and took two kidnappers into custody, whereas the other two kidnappers managed to escape.
According to Anantapur police, Dr Behjaat Hussain, a resident of Kismatpur, was kidnapped from his hospital at Kismatpur on Tuesday at 1pm by five unknown persons who were burqa clad.
Initially, the kidnappers confined him in an unidentified location in Hyderabad. The kidnappers spoke in Marathi.
However, after kidnapping Hussain, who was a faculty at a Dental college in Hyderabad and also runs a small clinic from his home at Prestige Royal Villas in Kismatpur of Rajendranagar, the offenders called his family and demanded Rs 10 crore ransom in Bitcoins.
“Hussain has inherited properties and the offenders knew it. One of the accused is a relative of Hussain,” Cyberabad police said.
“The dentist was selected as a target as he is financially sound. Kidnappers demanded 10 crore through Bitcoins. Upon intimation from Hyderabad police, while we tried to intercept them at Anantpur, they escaped towards Kanaganapalli. After surrounding from all sides, the vehicle alongwith one accused, by name Sanjay, was caught on hot pursuit, while other three ran towards nearby fields. The victim’s hands and legs were tied. He was kept in car and later rescued,” said Anantapur SP Yesubabu.
Dr Hussain said, “I resisted kidnappers at my clinic and they inflicted injuries on my hand. They took my Innova. Later, they took me to a hideout. They asked me to cooperate. They gave me water and bed to sleep. Around 2am they put me in Bolera car and tied me up.”

Source Article

Read More
health

How much bias is too much to become a police officer? Experts fear policing law might backfire

An ambitious new law in California taking aim at potential biases of prospective officers has raised questions and concerns among police officers and experts who fear that if implemented inadequately, the law could undermine its own mission to change policing and culture of law enforcement.



a person holding a sign: A billboard in the town of Marysville, Calif., on Saturday, June 20, 2020. (Photo by Melina Mara/The Washington Post/file)


© Melina Mara/The Washington Post
A billboard in the town of Marysville, Calif., on Saturday, June 20, 2020. (Photo by Melina Mara/The Washington Post/file)

The law, which was signed by Gov. Gavin Newsom on Sept. 30, will expand the present screening requirements by mandating all law enforcement agencies to conduct mental evaluations of peace officer candidates to identify both implicit and explicit biases against race, ethnicity, gender, religion and sexual orientation in order to exclude unfit recruits.

While experts, police unions and lawmakers agree on the value of identifying whether those who aspire to become officers carry considerable degrees of biases, it is the lack of clarity on what tools and measures will be used to look for implicit biases that is raising concerns and prompting questions.

“If police departments start to reject applicants because they have implicit biases there will be no one left to hire,” said Laurie Fridell, professor of Criminology at the University of South Florida and founder of the Fair and Impartial Policing program, one of the most popular implicit bias awareness trainings in the country.

Under the new law, the state Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) will review and develop new regulations and screening materials to identify these potential explicit and implicit biases. It will be up to each agency in the state to determine how to administrate them.

POST information officer Meagan Catafi would not say whether implicit bias tests will be part of the new screenings, arguing “it is too premature at this point to know what will be assessed and used in our materials.”

Catafi said POST will be working with psychologists and law enforcement experts to incorporate these new required items to the current psychological screening manual and have until January 2022 to complete the process.

The law comes amid a moment of social upheaval where police departments across the country are facing scrutiny and increasing calls for accountability over cases of slayings of unarmed civilians and excessive use of force that predominantly affects minorities.

This has prompted many agencies to ramp up efforts to identify racist and other discriminatory beliefs that could lead to destructive behavior, mostly by incorporating bias, diversity and inclusion training programs for active officers.

None of the experts interviewed by The Washington Post claimed to know of law enforcement agencies that screen for unconscious biases — those that people are unwilling or unable to identify — as a hiring standard. All of them, however, are either wary of such approach or advice against it.

“This is a tough one. What do you do if someone tests positive for racism?” Do you train them again? Do you fire them? There are a lot of unknowns about how this

Read More
health

Police Given Access to Details of People Told to Self-Isolate by UK Government’s System | World News

(Reuters) – British police forces have been granted access to details of people who have been told to self-isolate under the government’s ‘test and trace’ system, the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) said late on Saturday.

A spokesman for the department said it agreed with the National Police Chiefs Council (NPCC) that officers could have access on a case-by-case basis to information on whether a specific individual has been notified to self-isolate.

“The memorandum of understanding ensures that information is shared with appropriate safeguards and in accordance with the law. No testing or health data is shared in this process,” the spokesman said in an emailed statement.

The development was reported earlier by Sky News, which also cited an NPCC statement saying police will continue encouraging voluntary compliance but will enforce regulations and issue fixed penalty notices (FPN) when needed.

“Where people fail to self-isolate and refuse to comply, officers can issue FPNs and direct people to return to self-isolation. Officers will engage with individuals to establish their circumstances, using their discretion wherever it is reasonable to do so,” the NPCC statement said.

The test and trace system, which Prime Minister Boris Johnson promised would be world beating, has seen setbacks including a glitch identified earlier this month that delayed the upload of nearly 16,000 cases into computer systems, including for contact tracers.

In recent weeks, the COVID-19 infection rate has risen sharply in Britain with an accelerating second wave, prompting Johnson and other regional leaders to introduce tighter restrictions and local lockdowns.

Britain has one of the highest death rates from the virus in Europe and previously suffered the worst economic contraction of any leading nation from the outbreak.

(Reporting by Kanishka Singh; Editing by Daniel Wallis)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

Source Article

Read More
health

Police given access to details of people told to self-isolate by UK government’s system

By Kanishka Singh

(Reuters) – British police forces have been granted access to details of people who have been told to self-isolate under the government’s ‘test and trace’ system, the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) said late on Saturday.

A spokesman for the department said it agreed with the National Police Chiefs Council (NPCC) that officers could have access on a case-by-case basis to information on whether a specific individual has been notified to self-isolate.

“The memorandum of understanding ensures that information is shared with appropriate safeguards and in accordance with the law. No testing or health data is shared in this process,” the spokesman said in an emailed statement.

The development was reported earlier by Sky News, which also cited an NPCC statement saying police will continue encouraging voluntary compliance but will enforce regulations and issue fixed penalty notices (FPN) when needed.

“Where people fail to self-isolate and refuse to comply, officers can issue FPNs and direct people to return to self-isolation. Officers will engage with individuals to establish their circumstances, using their discretion wherever it is reasonable to do so,” the NPCC statement said.

The test and trace system, which Prime Minister Boris Johnson promised would be world beating, has seen setbacks including a glitch identified earlier this month that delayed the upload of nearly 16,000 cases into computer systems, including for contact tracers.

In recent weeks, the COVID-19 infection rate has risen sharply in Britain with an accelerating second wave, prompting Johnson and other regional leaders to introduce tighter restrictions and local lockdowns.

Britain has one of the highest death rates from the virus in Europe and previously suffered the worst economic contraction of any leading nation from the outbreak.

(Reporting by Kanishka Singh; Editing by Daniel Wallis)

Source Article

Read More