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health

Living in Noisy Neighborhoods May Raise Your Dementia Risk

Long-term exposure to noise may be linked to an increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.

Researchers did periodic interviews with 5,227 people 65 and older participating in a study on aging. They assessed them with standard tests of orientation, memory and language, and tracked average daytime noise levels in their neighborhoods for the five years preceding the cognitive assessments. About 11 percent had Alzheimer’s disease, and 30 percent had mild cognitive impairment, which often progresses to full-blown dementia.

Residential noise levels varied widely, from 51 to 78 decibels, or from the level of a relatively quiet suburban neighborhood to that of an urban setting near a busy highway. The study is in Alzheimer’s & Dementia.

After controlling for education, race, smoking, alcohol consumption, neighborhood air pollution levels and other factors, they found that each 10 decibel increase in community noise level was associated with a 36 percent higher likelihood of mild cognitive impairment, and a 29 percent increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease. The associations were strongest in poorer neighborhoods, which also had higher noise levels.

The reasons for the connection are unknown, but the lead author, Jennifer Weuve, an associate professor of epidemiology at Boston University, suggested that excessive noise can cause sleep deprivation, hearing loss, increased heart rate, constriction of the blood vessels and elevated blood pressure, all of which are associated with an increased risk for dementia.

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health

‘What we are living through is a horrific national tragedy,’ PM warns alluding to ‘difficult’ times ahead

For more on today’s top stories and the spread of the novel coronavirus across the country, please refer to our live updates below throughout the day, as well as our COVID-19 news hub.

Prime minister’s frank message about COVID-19: ‘This sucks’

As Canada nears 10,000 deaths from COVID-19, PM Trudeau didn’t waste time mincing words about the dark reality of the pandemic.

“What we are living through is a horrific national tragedy. Families have lost loved ones, been devastated by these tragedies and we need to know that there are more tragedies to come,” the leader said. He added that families “need to be there for each other”, but understands the months coming are “still going to be a very difficult time for many Canadians.”

When asked about Canadians having “COVID-19 fatigue” and being frustrated with the rules in place, Prime Minister had a frank message to the public, “this sucks.”

“It’s tough going through this second wave, it’s frustrating having shut down all of [our lives] through the spring and now [being] forced to make more difficult choices and knowing that it’s going to be a tough winter ahead as well,” the prime minister said. “It’s easy for us to want to throw up our hands.”

“I think we have to ask ourselves who we really are as Canadians. Are we really good neighbours? Are we really people who care about the vulnerable, about each other?”

Trudeau said Canadians are not going to be “perfect” at all times but urged the public to follow local public health advice, even though that might differ from province to province or city to city, in order to flatten the curve this winter.

“It’s frustrating to have to explain to your kids in many parts of the country, like here in Ottawa, that we’re not going to be trick-or-treating this weekend,” the prime minister said. “It’s frustrating knowing that unless we’re really, really careful there may not be the kinds of family gatherings we want to have at Christmas.”

Trudeau shared that his six-year-old son asked him a few weeks ago if COVID-19 is going to be “forever.”

“He’s in Grade 1 and this was supposed to be his big year as a big boy, and they’re not even singing in his classroom,” the prime minister said. “This is really difficult, it’s a time where we need to do the right thing, we need to lean on each other, we need to use all the tools we can.”

Is there hope for 2021?

“Vaccines are on the horizon, spring and summer will come and they will be better than this winter. It’s frustrating to have to go though this situation, nobody wanted 2020 to be this way, but we do get to control how bad it gets by all of us doing our part.”

Trudeau added that provinces need to make the “tough decisions” on what needs to close and when, while the federal government comes in with income supports

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health

50 Sex Offenders Living In Rohnert Park-Cotati: 2020 Safety Map

ROHNERT PARK-COTATI, CA — Although kids most likely will not go trick or treating this Halloween because of the coronavirus, parents can still take an inventory of who is living in their neighborhood. Rohnert Park and Cotati currently have a combined 50 registered sex offenders, two fewer than were living in the cities this time last year, according to public information listed on the California Department of Justice’s Megan’s Law Website.

The state runs the website, which provides information on registered sex offenders, pursuant to California Penal Code § 290.46, “… so that members of the public can better protect themselves and their families.” The information is pulled from California Sex and Arson Registry.

According to state officials, Rohnert Park has 41 offenders, while Cotati has nine. In Sonoma County, there are 604 registered sex offenders, 119 of whom are transients known to stay within the county.

The below maps from the state’s Megan’s Law website show where sex offenders are registered as living in Rohnert Park, Cotati and Sonoma County as of Oct. 20, 2020. Blue markers show registered sex offenders, while red markers show sex offenders currently accused of being in violation of their registration requirements; a marker with a white plus sign means there are multiple offenders living at one location. It should be noted that yellow markers indicate “sexually violent offenders,” none of whom showed up in Patch’s search of Rohnert Park and Cotati.

VIEW INTERACTIVE MAP

Here’s how to find and view an interactive map of sex offenders in your California community. First, visit the Megan’s Law home page. On the right side of the page, you can enter an address and hit “search.”

There’s some information and a disclaimer you’ll need to read; scroll to the bottom, click that you’ve read the info (once you have, of course) and reCAPTCHA, and click “continue.”

Once you’ve arrived at the search page, you can use the menu on the left side of the screen to search by name, address, city, ZIP code or county. If you’re doing a city search, click on “city” and start typing the city name in the empty field on the left side of the page. Click “search” to generate an interactive map. The number at the top of the map indicates how many postable offenders have addresses in the city. Click on “Show List” to see a list of offenders’ names and addresses, as well as transients and those who are in violation, according to the Department of Justice, of registering in their city of residence.

NOT ALL OFFENDERS LISTED

It’s important to keep in mind that the Megan’s Law site does not list every sex offender living in the community. Under California’s Penal Code section 290, the DOJ is only authorized to display certain types of sex offenders online, according to the agency.

People who have been convicted of a registrable sexual offense that falls into one of the following categories can apply for exclusion from Megan’s Law

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health

Frozen Food Package Polluted by Living Coronavirus Could Cause Infection, China’s CDC Says | Top News

BEIJING (Reuters) – China’s disease control authority said on Saturday that contact with frozen food packaging contaminated by living new coronavirus could cause infection.

The conclusion came as the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) detected and isolated living coronavirus on the outer packaging of frozen cod during efforts to trace the virus in an outbreak reported last week in the city of Qingdao, the agency said on its website.

The finding, a world first, suggests it is possible for the virus to be conveyed over long distances via frozen goods, it said.

Two dock workers in Qingdao who were initially diagnosed as asymptomatic infections in September brought the virus to a chest hospital during quarantine due to insufficient disinfection and protection, leading to another 12 infections linked to the hospital, authorities said last week.

However, the CDC’s latest statement does not show solid proof that the two workers in Qingdao caught the virus from the packaging directly, rather than contracting the virus from somewhere else and then contaminating the food packaging they handled, said Jin Dong-Yan, a virology professor at the University of Hong Kong.

The CDC said no instance had been found of any consumer contracting the virus by having contact with frozen food and the risk of this happening remained very low.

Nonetheless it advised that workers who handle, process and sell frozen products should avoid direct skin contact with products that could possibly be polluted.

Staff should not touch their mouth or nose before taking off work garments that could possibly be contaminated without washing their hands and should take tests regularly, the agency said.

Prior to the CDC’s latest findings genetic traces of the virus had been found in some samples taken from frozen food or food packaging, but the amount of virus was low and no living virus was isolated, the agency said.

Only living virus can infect people, while samples containing dead virus could also test positive for virus traces, Jin said.

(Reporting by Roxanne Liu and Tony Munroe; Editing by David Holmes)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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health

Frozen food package polluted by living coronavirus could cause infection, China’s CDC says

BEIJING (Reuters) – China’s disease control authority said on Saturday that contact with frozen food packaging contaminated by living new coronavirus could cause infection.

The conclusion came as the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) detected and isolated living coronavirus on the outer packaging of frozen cod during efforts to trace the virus in an outbreak reported last week in the city of Qingdao, the agency said on its website.

The finding, a world first, suggests it is possible for the virus to be conveyed over long distances via frozen goods, it said.

Two dock workers in Qingdao who were initially diagnosed as asymptomatic infections in September brought the virus to a chest hospital during quarantine due to insufficient disinfection and protection, leading to another 12 infections linked to the hospital, authorities said last week.

However, the CDC’s latest statement does not show solid proof that the two workers in Qingdao caught the virus from the packaging directly, rather than contracting the virus from somewhere else and then contaminating the food packaging they handled, said Jin Dong-Yan, a virology professor at the University of Hong Kong.

The CDC said no instance had been found of any consumer contracting the virus by having contact with frozen food and the risk of this happening remained very low.

Nonetheless it advised that workers who handle, process and sell frozen products should avoid direct skin contact with products that could possibly be polluted.

Staff should not touch their mouth or nose before taking off work garments that could possibly be contaminated without washing their hands and should take tests regularly, the agency said.

Prior to the CDC’s latest findings genetic traces of the virus had been found in some samples taken from frozen food or food packaging, but the amount of virus was low and no living virus was isolated, the agency said.

Only living virus can infect people, while samples containing dead virus could also test positive for virus traces, Jin said.

(Reporting by Roxanne Liu and Tony Munroe; Editing by David Holmes)

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health

Rural living, chronic illness and COVID-19

PRAIRIE, Miss. (AP) — COVID-19 hit Prairie native Shirley Judd suddenly and hard. One day in late August, she felt fine; the next, she could barely move.

As soon as the symptoms struck, Judd called her aunt to take her to West Point to see a doctor, where she tested positive for COVID-19.

“When I got home, I had to go straight to bed. I couldn’t even sit up or do anything. I had headaches starting off, and I was just shaking, throwing up,” Judd said. “After about four days, or five, that’s when my throat got so sore I couldn’t swallow. I couldn’t eat anything.”

She visited another doctor in Houston on Labor Day and received shots and antibiotics. By Wednesday, her condition worsened. She was losing weight, and her mouth was swollen. At approximately 8 a.m., she checked into the North Mississippi Medical Center in Tupelo for treatment.

What made Judd’s experience more harrowing was that she has multiple sclerosis, a chronic illness that affects the central nervous system. Judd is 53 and has been on disability for the condition since 1987. She has had two hip replacements because of MS, and changes treatments every two years. She receives infusion treatments every six months and thought her initial illness resulted from MS flaring rather than a COVID-19 diagnosis.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have long said people with underlying medical conditions and older adults are at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19. While the National Multiple Sclerosis Society website states that current evidence suggests MS doesn’t increase the risk of dying from the COVID-19, possible long-term consequences of MS, age and higher levels of disability can increase the risk of being hospitalized for COVID-19.

Judd’s primary concern was maintaining her household while recovering, and she’s grateful family members stepped in to help. Family friend Lee Thomas did most of her cooking and cleaning, and cousins Yolanda Ewing and Chris Ewing helped bring supplies and food to her.


“Everything and everybody was really good about helping me out until I got straightened out and could get around,” Judd said. “That was a blessing.”

Judd also received financial support from Okolona-based nonprofit Excel Inc. by applying for the COVID-19 Support Fund, which is available to people affected by COVID-19. The organization paid her water and light bills while she was recovering.

“With Excel, I appreciate what they did because at the time, I couldn’t do anything,” Judd said. “It was a blessing and a miracle.”

Judd is also Black and lives in a rural community, both factors the CDC claims might require extra precautions against COVID-19. As of Oct. 11, Black Chickasaw residents of Non-Hispanic and unknown ethnicity were 49% of Chickasaw’s 777 cases since March 11, according to the Mississippi State Department of Health. The U.S. Census Bureau estimates Black people are approximately 45% of Chickasaw’s population. Statewide, Black people account for 48% of COVID-18 cases as of Oct. 4, despite only representing 38% of the

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medicine

Living Health Integrative Medicine Celebrates its 19th Anniversary

Living Health Integrative Medicine, Which Was Founded by Dr. Thomas Chaney and Dr. Stephanie Chaney, Provides a Natural and Effective Integrative Approach to Health

ANNAPOLIS, MD / ACCESSWIRE / October 13, 2020 / Dr. Thomas Chaney and Dr. Stephanie Chaney are pleased to announce that Living Health Integrative Medicine, which they co-founded, is celebrating 19 years in business.

To contact Living Health Integrative Medicine and/or to sign up for their newsletter, please visit https://www.mylivinghealth.com/contact-us/.

As Dr. Thomas Chaney noted, he and Dr. Stephanie Chaney are proud of the way their devotion to integrative medicine has helped Living Health Integrative Medicine to become the leader in holistic wellness throughout Maryland, Washington DC and Northern Virginia.

They also take pride in the fact that they are leaders in functional medicine and physical medicine. They use the most current research and science to help guide the treatments they suggest for their valued patients.

Dr. Thomas Chaney, Dr. Stephanie Chaney and their team of practitioners truly live up to their practice’s name, working as an integrated team to provide everyone with the best possible care and results.

“Our model of integrative medicine incorporates natural therapies and treatments to address the whole body versus simply treating a symptom temporarily,” Dr. Thomas Chaney said.

“Our goal is to help you achieve your health goals and for you to reach your maximum health potential.”

From people who are dealing with the pain associated with neuropathy, to those who are looking for effective physical therapy, require regenerative medicine treatments and/or wish to lose weight or have been diagnosed with diabetes, Dr. Stephanie Chaney said they focus on practicing integrative medicine, which focuses on identifying the root cause of health issues.

“We combine multiple treatment options, such as chiropractic, physical therapy, functional medicine, nutrition, regenerative medicine, diagnostic testing, dietary supplement therapy, detoxification and custom nutrition plans,” she said.

About Dr. Thomas Chaney, Dr. Stephanie Chaney and Living Health Integrative Medicine:

Dr. Thomas Chaney is a Maryland native and the founder and co-owner of Living Health Integrative Medicine, which takes a holistic approach to healthcare. He is the co-author of the best-selling books “Lose the Gluten, Lose your Gut. Ditch the Grain, Save your Brain” and “Defeat Diabetes.” Dr. Chaney is a respected member of the profession with a national reputation for dedication to helping the public improve their health naturally.

Dr. Stephanie Chaney grew up in Ottawa Canada and is the co-owner of Living Health Integrative Medicine. She is a leader in the integrative health field, sharing her knowledge with practitioners and the public. Dr. Chaney is a renowned speaker on holistic health and regular guest on the morning show, Great Day Washington. She has also been featured as a guest natural health expert on FOX, ABC and NBC. She is the co-author of the best-selling books “Lose the Gluten, Lose your Gut. Ditch the Grain, Save your Brain” and “Defeat Diabetes.”

For more information, please visit https://www.mylivinghealth.com/.

Living Health Integrative Medicine

1833 Forest Drive, Suite A

Annapolis, MD

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