Hospital

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Ratchaphruek Hospital Achieves GHA’s COVID-19 Certification of Conformance for Medical Travel

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla., Oct. 27, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Ratchaphruek Hospital (https://rph.co.th/en/), a top destination for medical travelers to Thailand, is the second hospital in Thailand and the third hospital in the world to be awarded Global Healthcare Accreditation’s Certification of Conformance with COVID-19 Guidelines for Medical Travel Programs.

Ratchaphruek Hospital's CEO, Dr. Teerawat Srinakarin, along with staff and GHA's CEO, Ms. Karen Timmons and Bill Cook, Director of Business Development, as the latter announce their certification remotely.
Ratchaphruek Hospital’s CEO, Dr. Teerawat Srinakarin, along with staff and GHA’s CEO, Ms. Karen Timmons and Bill Cook, Director of Business Development, as the latter announce their certification remotely.

The Global Healthcare Accreditation (GHA) Program for Medical Travel Services issued the free COVID-19 Guidelines earlier this year to assist organizations in the medical and health tourism industries seeking to mitigate the risk of coronavirus infection for both domestic and international traveling patients and their companions. The guidelines are unique in that they focus on the entire care continuum, including interactions with the healthcare organization, hotel, and ground transportation.

­Dr. Teerawat Srinakarin, Ratchaphruek Hospital’s Chief Executive Officer stated, “Due to the global COVID-19 pandemic, currently and at least in the near future, there are varying degrees of concern about risk and safety for patients and their families to travel for medical purposes.  I believe the GHA COVID-19 program is one of the most important tools for organizations to implement systematic action guidelines that help to mitigate patient /family pain points and build better experience and trust. On behalf of Ratchaphruek Hospital, I would like to acknowledge Dr. Somporn Kumphong, a GHA representative of Thailand, Karen H. Timmons, CEO and Bill Cook, Director of Business Development for GHA, who have supported us through all the process and have worked together with Ratchaphruek Hospital to help build patient confidence during these challenging moments.”

The Certification of Conformance for hospitals and ambulatory centers is a three-year certification with annual reviews, which signals to medical travelers, referrers, and other payers that the organization has implemented the recommendations in the guidelines as a proactive risk mitigation strategy to ensure patient safety and well-being during and post-COVID-19.  Embedded within the Certification process is an online training for staff to familiarize themselves with the Guidelines and Certification process.

According to Karen Timmons, Chief Executive Officer, Global Healthcare Accreditation (GHA), “The COVID-19 Certification of Conformance helps increase patient trust in an organization by demonstrating that a medical travel program has implemented operational protocols, practices, and procedures that have undergone an external review and reflect international best practices designed to keep traveling patients safe. We congratulate Ratchaphruek Hospital on achieving GHA’s Certification of Conformance and for its strong focus on patient safety and patient experience.”

The Global Healthcare Accreditation (GHA) COVID-19 Program for Medical Travel Services Guidelines are free and the Certification of Conformance is a process that is accomplished virtually and usually within a three to six week period of time.

About GHA

Founded in 2016, the Global Healthcare Accreditation for Medical Travel Services is the only accrediting body focused solely on medical travel services. GHA’s international standards and professional norms for

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health

France sees highest number of COVID-19 patients going into hospital since April

PARIS (Reuters) – French hospitals registered 1,307 new coronavirus patients on Monday in the highest one-day increase since April 2, which saw 1,607 new patients, as the health system comes under increasing stress from a runaway infection rate.

French health ministry data showed that France now has a total of 17,784 coronavirus patients in its hospitals, compared with a record 32,292 on April 14, at the height of the March-May lockdown.

The ministry also reported 26,771 new confirmed coronavirus cases in past 24 hours, from 52,010 on Sunday. On Monday, the tally usually drops sharply because of reporting lags over the weekend.

The death toll went up by 257, taking the cumulative total since the start of the epidemic to 35,018. The number of people in intensive care units rose by 186 to 2,770.

Several regions in France have implemented emergency plans in hospitals, delaying non-essential operations to make space in ICU units for COVID-19 patients and cancelling staff holidays.

Sources told Reuters that authorities were looking at options for still tighter measures to fight COVID-19, including starting a 9 p.m. to 6 a.m curfew earlier, confining people to their homes at weekends except for essential trips, and closing non-essential shops.

(Reporting by Geert De Clercq, Editing by Franklin Paul and Alison Williams)

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health

VeChain, Renji Hospital and DNV GL Held Strategic Partnership Signing Ceremony To Launch World’s First Blockchain Intelligent Tumor Treatment Center

SHANGHAI, Oct. 27, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — In partnership with VeChain and DNV GL, Renji Hospital, a top-ranked hospital in China affiliated with the Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, has announced the launch of the world’s first blockchain-enabled Intelligent Tumor Treatment Center on October 20, 2020. The Intelligent Tumor Treatment Center is a transparent, efficient, and traceable medical management solution powered by VeChain ToolChainTM.

Sunny Lu, Co-founder and CEO of VeChain & Jidong Zhang, Vice President of Renji Hospital & George Kang, Senior Vice President of DNV GL Group
Sunny Lu, Co-founder and CEO of VeChain & Jidong Zhang, Vice President of Renji Hospital & George Kang, Senior Vice President of DNV GL Group

As strategic partners of this new initiative, VeChain and DNV GL will jointly support the hospital in the quest to improve global public health through state-of-the-art blockchain technology and professional advisory.

VeChain ToolChainTM Powers The World’s First Intelligent Tumor Treatment Center 

The Intelligent Tumor Treatment Center combines the advantages of VeChain blockchain technology with DNV GL’s professional services. It enables full patient ownership of personal medical records, allowing patients to take control of the authorization and medical records data management. Research institutions inside and outside the hospital can use authorized data to improve the efficiency of clinical research, and regulatory agencies can use authorized data to conduct business compliance checks on medical institutions and establish a credit evaluation system.

Zhang Jidong, Vice President of Renji Hospital, said, “The launch of the Intelligent Tumor Treatment Centre intends to enhance high-quality integrated development of Renji Hospital. Moving forward, Renji intends to boost our healthcare facilities with more blockchain-powered use cases and projects, which will be gradually disclosed together with our partners when the time is right.”

George Kang, Senior Vice President of DNV GL Group, said, “Through independent and objective medical evaluation methods, DNV GL intends to provide more services for Renji Hospital to improve its service quality and medical experience, moving to a new stage of higher standards, higher requirements and higher quality.”

Sunny Lu, co-founder and CEO of VeChain, said, “As digital transformation accelerates in the healthcare sector, VeChain will continue to demonstrate its advantages and flexibility as a superior blockchain platform that is suitable for all types of use cases and industries. We are very proud and excited to be contributing to the public health industry by providing the technology for Renji Hospital’s Intelligent Tumor Treatment Centre.”

VeChain Facilitating Digital Transformation To Improve Public Health

In line with the Chinese Government’s 14th Five-Year (2021-2025) Plan for Economic and Social Development, the National Health Commission formulated an official guideline and re-emphasized blockchain technology as an essential innovation and integration of the medical and health industry. VeChain is committed to solving the pain points of digital medical reform through blockchain technology and balancing personal privacy and public interests.

By using the self-developed one-stop data BaaS platform VeChain ToolChainTM , we have many proven cases in the medical sector, including a blockchain powered Clinical Trial Traceability Platform for Bayer China, and a blockchain-enabled medical data management platform named The E-NewHealthLife

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health

Texas seeks to shore up hospital capacity in El Paso as coronavirus cases surge nationwide

New reported infections nationwide surpassed 80,000 for the first time this Friday and again Saturday, as hospitalizations push past 40,000 and daily death tolls begin to climb. Officials are already trying to shore up overwhelmed facilities: In Texas, Gov. Greg Abbott (R) on Sunday announced that state authorities are creating a new site for medical care and deploying extra resources to hospitals in El Paso, where covid-19 hospitalizations have nearly quadrupled to almost 800 in less than three weeks.

The United States’ latest case spike, expected to intensify as winter draws closer, is geographically broader than the spring surge that devastated East Coast states and the summer wave that hit the South and Southwest. And it comes as leaders are leery of renewed shutdowns, as Americans grow wearier of restrictions and as the Thanksgiving travel season looms.

In previous waves, “our governments reacted,” said Megan Ranney, an emergency medicine professor at Brown University. “We closed bars. We closed restaurants. We enforced mask mandates. And I’m not seeing a lot of that nationally right now.”

“We are set up for just a perfect storm — a conflagration,” she said. “Right now, you can talk about there being lots of little burning fires across the country. And then Thanksgiving will be the wind that will whip this fire up into an absolutely human disaster for our country.”

In El Paso, authorities are urging people to stay home as efforts to add hospital beds kick in. The new facility announced by Abbott, set to open this week at the El Paso Convention and Performing Arts Center, will start at 50 beds but can expand to 100 if necessary, the governor’s office said, while “auxiliary medical units” sent to hospitals can boost capacity by 100 beds.

In a Sunday call, Abbott also asked the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to ease the pressure with a Department of Defense medical center in El Paso. Abbott asked to house non-coronavirus patients in William Beaumont Army Medical Center so that hospitals in the El Paso area could give more beds to those with covid-19, the disease the novel coronavirus causes.

Health and Human Services did not immediately provide a comment.

New daily infections in El Paso have rocketed from fewer than 25,000 at the beginning of the month to more than 38,500 this weekend, according to The Washington Post’s tracking. New deaths have yet to surpass a peak in August, but deaths lag behind spikes in cases and hospitalizations.

The mayor of El Paso, Dee Margo, said he learned on a recent ride-along with fire officials that most of their calls are related to the coronavirus. If moves to address hospitals’ strain do not work, he said, he will ask the governor for more action. He pleaded with residents to mind their behavior to avoid “drastic measures.”

Some public health experts say they are not optimistic about the chances of ramping up coronavirus restrictions again across the country.

“I don’t see forceful policy intervention happening

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health

Father runs around hospital for 4-year-old son with cancer

There were two thoughts pushing Kolt Codner forward in his first marathon race: his 4-year-old son Andrew’s fight against cancer and the hospital that provides him care.



a group of people in a park: An Ohio dad ran his first marathon to support his son fighting cancer and raise money for Akron Children's Hospital.


© Courtesy Akron Children’s Hospital
An Ohio dad ran his first marathon to support his son fighting cancer and raise money for Akron Children’s Hospital.

Codner, of Poland, Ohio, ran 26.2 miles around Akron Children’s Hospital on October 17 to raise money for the hospital treating his son, who has 26 months left in his treatment.

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In early May, Codner and his wife Tristan received a phone call that Andrew had a bed waiting for him in the hematology and oncology unit of the hospital.

A day that began as a visit to the pediatrician for Andrew’s swollen face had resulted in a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a common childhood cancer.

Codner’s run served to show his appreciation to the hospital staff that has turned a traumatic experience like cancer treatment into one his young son faces bravely, Codner says.

“The folks at Akron Children’s have taken something that should be scary and terrifying and made it this amazing badge of honor to recognize the superhero that he is,” Codner told CNN. “We couldn’t think of a better thing to contribute to and spend time trying to help raise funds to ensure that all kids have access to the same amazing experience as Andrew has had at Akron Children’s.”

Codner participated in the race as part of the virtual FirstEnergy Akron Marathon, Half Marathon & Team Relay, which replaced the hospital’s yearly marathon due to the coronavirus pandemic. According to the virtual marathon guidelines, runners can race at any location or pace, and Codner decided to run his marathon around the hospital to spotlight their work.

On the day of the race, Codner wrote Andrew’s name on the top of his running shoes to keep him motivated. Friends and family were stationed outside the hospital to cheer him on, in a course that took 5 hours and 35 laps to complete. His son was even able to run with him across the finish line and award him a medal.

“To see him running and doing that last lap with me was just incredible,” Codner said.

By the end of the run, Codner had raised 10 times more than his initial goal of $1,000, according to a hospital press release. The fund has reached over $13,000 in donations and has expanded its window until November 30.

Dr. Megan Sampson, a pediatric oncologist who has treated Andrew at the hospital, praises the Codner family.

“It just amazed me that during this scary time that he was thinking about doing this,” said Sampson, referring to Codner’s run and the attention he has drawn to the hospital’s work.

Andrew’s prognosis is good and he’s responding well to the treatment he has received, but he still has a long way to go, Sampson says.



Kolt Codner's son awards him with a medal after completing his marathon to raise money for Akron Children's Hospital.


© Courtesy Akron Children’s Hospital
Kolt Codner’s son awards him with

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medicine

Northwestern Medicine Central DuPage Hospital offers MitraClip, an alternative treatment to open heart valve surgery

In patients with mitral regurgitation, the mitral valve does not close completely, allowing blood to flow backward or “leak” into the upper chamber of the heart, causing shortness of breath, fatigue and dizziness. The debilitating condition can lead to congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation, pulmonary hypertension, stroke or death.

Historically, patients with severe mitral regurgitation required open heart surgery. The Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute at Northwestern Medicine Central DuPage Hospital is now offering Mitraclip, a minimally invasive procedure for patients who may not be able to tolerate surgery.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

“As a national leader in transcatheter mitral valve treatment options, Northwestern Memorial Hospital has one of the highest-volume MitraClip programs in Illinois,” said Patrick McCarthy, MD, executive director of the Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute and chief of cardiac surgery at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. “By training our team at Central DuPage Hospital in Winfield, we are bringing advanced care to patients closer to where they live.”

During MitraClip implantation, a catheter is inserted through the femoral vein in the leg, up into the heart until it reaches the diseased mitral valve. The MitraClip implant is compressed and advanced along the guide wire so that it can be properly positioned to join or “clip” together a portion of the mitral valve, reducing or eliminating the backward flow of blood.

“Patients experience a noticeable difference in their symptoms and improved quality of life very quickly,” said Imran N. Ahmad, MD, interventional cardiologist and medical director of the Northwestern Medicine Central DuPage Hospital Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory. “With the less invasive procedure, patients spend only 24 to 48 hours in the hospital, compared to about five days for an open heart procedure.”

William Lenschow, of Sycamore, was the first patient to undergo the MitraClip procedure at Northwestern Medicine Central DuPage Hospital. The 84 year-old farmer was so weak from his leaking mitral valve that he found it difficult to walk. Within two weeks of the procedure, Lenschow was back at work on his farm harvesting the soybean crop.


        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

“Before the procedure I was so tired I slept more than I ever have in my life. I could only sit around and do nothing. I’ve never lived my life that way,” said Lenschow. “After the procedure, I felt better almost immediately. It feels good to be active and working again.”

Northwestern Memorial Hospital participated in the COAPT clinical trial, which found treatment with MitraClip leads to a reduction in hospitalizations for heart failure and death compared to medical therapy alone. As a result of these findings, the FDA approved MitraClip for patients with functional or secondary mitral regurgitation caused by diminished heart function

“Mitral valve disease is one of the most common valve disorder in the United States and one of the more difficult to treat,” said Jonathan Tomasko, MD, cardiac surgeon at Northwestern Medicine Central DuPage Hospital. “MitraClip arms us with another tool in

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health

Doctors Hospital updates visitation policy

Doctors Hospital has revised its visitation policy effective Friday, Oct. 23, 2020.

All visitors are subject to screening upon arrival and will be required to wear a facemask while visiting any of the DHL facilities. Bandanas, neck huggers and any masks with valves or vents are not appropriate face coverings as they provide very limited source control and therefore are prohibited from use.

Any individual who has been in contact with someone with fever, cough or influenza-like symptoms within the last 48 hours will be prohibited from visiting.

Travel history will be queried; those who have had travel to an affected country, as currently identified on the CDC Travel Health Notices list, will not be permitted to proceed within the hospital.


Visitors will be required to use hand-sanitizing gel (or hand washing) upon entering the facility as well as entering and exiting a patient room.

One visitor (family member) is allowed on inpatient areas for limited hours — 9 a.m. to noon and 5-8 p.m. — with the exception of confirmed or PUI COVID-19 designated units/rooms. Children under age 18 are not allowed to visit inpatient rooms.

Other visitation policies include:

Immunocompromised patient — Visitor will need to get a physician order for visitation.

Cancer center — No visitation is allowed.

Labor and delivery — One support person (family member) allowed who may stay overnight (no hour restriction).

Post-partum — One support person (family member) allowed who may stay overnight. (no hour restriction).

NICU — One support person (family member) allowed, but no overnight stay permitted (as per department policy).

Pediatrics — One support person (family member) allowed who may stay overnight.

ICU / non-COVID — One support person (family member) allowed, but no overnight stay permitted.

Med Surg unit / non-COVID – One support person (family member) allowed, but no overnight stay permitted.

Patients with disabilities and special needs

Patients with disabilities, including cognitive and developmental disabilities, who receive care at the hospital may have a designated support person present with them to support their disability needs at all times medically necessary where such does not interfere with their treatment.

One visitor (family member) may stay with ED patient (no hour restriction).

Outpatient (family member) surgery — One visitor may accompany the patient (no hour restriction).

Outpatient visits — One visitor (family member) may accompany the patient (no hour restriction).

Doctors Hospital fully supports the use of FaceTime, cell phones and other means of communication between the patient and their family/loved ones throughout the patient’s stay at Doctors Hospital.

Patient safety is a top concern at Doctors Hospital, and this policy on limited visitation is being implemented to protect every one during the time of the COVID-19 crisis.

This is subject to change as we continue to follow CDC, state and local governmental guidelines.

Thank you for your cooperation and for being an advocate for the health and care of your loved ones and all hospitalized patients.

Source Article

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health

Texas governor requests use of El Paso-area military hospital for non-COVID-19 patients as cases surge

Texas Governor Greg Abbott on Saturday requested to use a medical center at Fort Bliss for non-COVID-19 patients as coronavirus cases surge in the El Paso area. The request comes as COVID-19 cases have been increasing throughout Texas and the country.

Abbott said Saturday that he had spoken to Dr. Robert Kadiec, assistant secretary for preparedness and response at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, to request use of William Beaumont Army Medical Center to free up beds at the region’s hospitals, according to CBS El Paso affiliate KDBC.

El Paso officials said 1,216 new COVID-19 cases were reported on Saturday, for a total of 10,911 active cases and 38,554 cumulative cases.

El Paso officials said Saturday one person died, a woman in her 40s with underlying health conditions. There have been 572 deaths in El Paso due to COVID-19 since the pandemic began. 

As of Saturday, there were 715 people hospitalized in El Paso County due to COVID-19, including 199 in intensive care and 85 on ventilators.

US-TEXAS-HEALTH-VIRUS-ECONOMY
Cars line up for Covid-19 tests at the University of Texas El Paso on October 23, 2020 in El Paso, Texas. 

Photo by Paul Ratje / AFP) (Photo by PAUL RATJE/AFP via Getty Images


Abbott announced earlier this week that he would be sending more than 450 medical personnel to the El Paso area. He also said he will be sending extra equipment including ambulances, patient monitors, patient beds and oxygen concentrators.

“The medical personnel and supplies we are deploying to El Paso build upon the resources the state previously sent to the community and will provide much needed support to area hospitals and first responders,” Abbott said in a statement. “The State of Texas will continue to work with local officials to protect public health and help the El Paso community mitigate the spread of COVID-19.”  

A report by UT-Austin released Thursday said “the El Paso region has the most threatening projections, with an estimated 85% probability that COVID-19 cases will exceed local hospital capacity by November 8th, 2020.”

According to the same report, five other regions have a more than 25% chance of hospitals being overwhelmed with in 3 weeks: Amarillo (28%), Lubbock (29%), Wichita Falls (30%), San Angelo (29%) and Galveston (33%).

The Texas Department of Public Health reported Saturday more than 89,000 active cases of COVID-19 in the state, including more than 6,000 new cases. 

Coronavirus cases nationwide have been rising, with more cases reported on Friday than any other single day since the pandemic began. 

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health

COVID patient who was almost taken off life support just left hospital

  • A 26-year-old North Carolina coronavirus survivor returned home Tuesday after her heart repeatedly stopped beating for 30 minutes.
  • She had suffered complications including strokes, which have struck other young coronavirus patients for reasons doctors don’t fully understand. 
  • Doctors also don’t know why some critically ill young patients who were previously healthy die while others bounce back.  
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

When Tionna Hairston’s heart repeatedly stopped beating for 30 minutes, her doctors worried yet again that she wouldn’t make it. 

The 26-year-old in North Carolina was diagnosed with COVID-19 in May, and subsequently suffered a stroke that led to bleeding in her brain and blood clots in her heart that caused the cardiac arrest, the Winston-Salem Journal’s Richard Craver reported. 

The conditions left her unable to fully use her arms and legs, and she was put on a ventilator for more than two months. She also suffered kidney and liver failure. 

Doctors “thought that we should take her off of life support because she had no hope for life,” Hairston’s mom, Stacey Peatross said, according to Rasheeda Kabba, who covered the story for multiple local outlets. “They thought she would be a vegetable. She wouldn’t have any quality of life at all.” 

They were wrong. After family, friends, and strangers prayed for her, Hairston began improving. She entered rehab for more than a month, where she relearned basic activities of daily living, like eating and getting dressed. 

On Tuesday, she walked out of the hospital to continue rehab at home. She had been in medical care for 137 days. “My faith in God and the fact that I wanted to walk again” allowed her to survive, Hairston said. 

 

While she’s not fully recovered — she walks with a walker and has some memory loss — her doctors praised her recovery and the lessons it can teach others. 

First, people should know “20-somethings can get very sick from COVID and COVID complications,” Dr. James McLean, director of the Novant rehabilitation hospital in Winston-Salem, told Craver. “It’s not just older folks.” 

The other lesson is that Hairston “demonstrated that human spirit, that little flame inside that keeps us going, shows us that people can overcome things that we could never imagine.”

Other young COVID-19 patients have suffered strokes and neurological issues  

Doctors have been concerned to see strokes in young people with no prior history of strokes and, in some cases, mild or even asymptomatic COVID. 

In May, five young New Yorkers with COVID-19 were admitted to the hospital with life-threatening “large-vessel” strokes, or those caused by a blood clot that travels from the body into an artery in the brain, Business Insider’s Aylin Woodward previously reported. 

Doctors don’t yet understand exactly how COVID-19 influences stroke risk, but it may have to do with blood clots, which have appeared in other parts of coronavirus patients’ bodies, like the lungs and legs. 

COVID-19 has also been linked to a range of other neurological issues,

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health

When to take a child to the hospital for flu: Serious symptoms

Children with influenza, known as the flu, usually get better at home. However, when their symptoms are severe or last a long time, a child may need to go to the hospital for treatment.

Certain signs and symptoms indicate that medical treatment is necessary to avoid complications. Parents and caregivers should be aware of these so that they know to take prompt action when necessary.

In this article, we list the flu symptoms to watch out for in children. We also explain the typical timeline of flu symptoms and when to take a child to the hospital.

The flu is a respiratory illness. It occurs when an influenza virus infects the nose, throat, or, occasionally, the lungs. The symptoms of the flu in children are similar to those in adults. They include:

Some children may also experience vomiting or diarrhea.

Flu is not the same as the common cold. Some key differences between cold and flu symptoms can help a parent or caregiver identify which disease is affecting a child.

Usually, a fever and extreme tiredness accompany the flu. These symptoms are much more unusual in colds.

It is also important to note that the symptoms of the flu can be similar to those of COVID-19, which SARS-CoV-2 — the new coronavirus — causes. If there is a possibility that a child might have COVID-19, it is important to make sure that staff members are aware of this before arriving at a hospital or medical facility.

In most cases, parents or caregivers can treat a child with the flu at home. However, when the child has more severe symptoms or symptoms that persist for longer than normal, they may need to go to the hospital.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), if a child has the following symptoms, they require emergency medical treatment:

  • rapid breathing or difficulty breathing
  • blue tinge to the lips or face
  • ribs pulling in with each breath
  • chest pain
  • severe muscle pain
  • dehydration — signs in children include not urinating for 8 hours or more, having a dry mouth, or producing no tears when they cry
  • not alert
  • seizures
  • fever above 104°F (40°C)
  • in children less than 12 weeks of age, any fever, which is 100.4°F (38°C) or higher
  • fever or cough that worsens or improves and then comes back

This list is not exhaustive. If a parent or caregiver is concerned about any symptoms that do not appear on this list, they should still consult a medical professional.

If a child does require hospital treatment, doctors can use a range of treatments to help them recover from the flu. These include:

  • intravenous (IV) fluids to treat dehydration
  • antiviral medications to combat the flu virus
  • oxygen therapy, if a child is struggling to breathe

According to the CDC, since 2010, 7,000–26,000 children younger than 5 years of age have required hospitalization each year due to the flu.

Children are at risk of developing health complications from the flu. One study looking at

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