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medicine

Cherry Hill doctor can’t practice medicine after conspiracy conviction

TRENTON – A Cherry Hill doctor who pleaded guilty to defrauding Medicare can no longer practice medicine in New Jersey, a state agency says.

Robert Claude McGrath, D.O., has retired his license under a consent order with the state Board of Medical Examiners, according to the agency’s website. It said the license retirement would be “deemed a permanent revocation.”

Separately, a Stratford doctor  has agreed to a temporary suspension of his license after pleading guilty to a federal crime, the board said.

Michael Goldis, D.O., will stop practicing medicine on Oct. 30 under an interim consent order.

The board noted McGrath pleaded guilty in June 2017 to conspiring to commit health care fraud and received a 30-month term in federal prison.

McGrath admitted to defrauding Medicare and other health care benefit programs of $890,000 in payments, according to the order.

McGrath, 69, was released from custody in May of this year.

The doctor and his chiropractor son — Robert Christopher McGrath, 48, of Cherry Hill —were accused of using unqualified people to give physical therapy, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for New Jersey.

The fraud took place from January 2011 through April 2016, the federal prosecutor’s office said.

It said the McGraths owned Atlantic Spine & Joint Institute, a practice with offices in Westmont and Wayne, Pa., the federal prosecutor’s office said.

The younger McGrath received a 10-month prison term for conspiring to commit health care fraud in December 2017.

The McGraths and Atlantic Spine also agreed to pay $1.78 million plus interest to the federal government to resolve allegations that their scheme caused false claims to be submitted to Medicare. 

The state Attorney General’s Office moved to suspend or revoke the elder McGrath’s license in August, according to the Oct. 13

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Cleveland Boil Water Advisory Issued After Water Main Break In Richmond Hill

Following a large transmission water main break on Saturday night in Richmond Hill, Cleveland has issued a boil water advisory for residents in several cities.

The Cleveland Water Department stated that the advisory was issued because disease-causing organisms may have entered the state’s water system in some Northeast suburbs as a result of the water main break.

Residents in Richmond Heights, Gates Mills, Lyndhurst, Highland Heights, South Euclid, Mayfield, and Mayfield Heights should expect to be under the advisory through Monday morning.

Locals are advised to refrain from drinking water without flushing and boiling it first. All tap water that is used for should be flushed out for at least three minutes. Water should be brought to a boil for at least one minute before it is removed from the stove to be cooled. Residents could also drink bottled water until the advisory has been lifted.

Ignoring the advisory could result in waterborne illness, which could include stomach discomfort and nausea. Those with severely compromised immune systems such as the elderly and infants may be at increased risk and should speak to health care providers before consuming water during the advisory.

Although there is a boil water advisory in effect, officials cannot confirm whether the state’s water supply has been tainted following the water main break.

“Cleveland Water has no evidence at this time that the water system is contaminated. The possibility, however, does exist that the water system is contaminated and is issuing this advisory as a precaution,” the press release stated.

A truck drives through floodwaters in Lake Charles, Louisiana on October 10, 2020 following Hurricane Delta A truck drives through floodwaters in Lake Charles, Louisiana on October 10, 2020 following Hurricane Delta Photo: AFP / CHANDAN KHANNA

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