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Baby Finger Food Market Forecast to 2027

The global baby finger food market was valued at US$ 18,589. 43 million in 2019 and is projected to reach US$ 32,825. 92 million by 2027; it is expected to grow at a CAGR of 7. 4% from 2020 to 2027.

New York, Oct. 21, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Reportlinker.com announces the release of the report “Baby Finger Food Market Forecast to 2027 – COVID-19 Impact and Global Analysis by Product Type and Distribution Channel, and Geography” – https://www.reportlinker.com/p05978052/?utm_source=GNW

Finger foods are small pieces of food that infants and babies can hold and eat easily.These food products are known for their nutritional value and convenience in consumption.

These include fruit flavored sweet finger food along with the savory forms such as puffs, breadsticks, biscuits, and wafers as well as fruit and vegetable-based finger foods.Latest technological innovations have allowed manufacturers to push the limits of baby food, into finger foods.

Change in working demographics and adoption of modern lifestyles along with rise in disposable income have resulted in an increase in demand for baby finger food.

Based on product type, the baby finger food market is segmented into prepared, dried, and others. The prepared segment led the baby finger food market with the highest market share in 2019.Prepared form of baby finger food are food products which are ready to serve and convenient food options. Such type of products requires no further cooking and can be directly be consumed by the babies is a fresh food. Rapid urbanization along with change in working demographics have encouraged the adoption of convenience-oriented lifestyles, leading to surging demand for prepared baby finger foods products. The ease and convenience provided by these baby products offer parents lesser time in manual preparation of baby foods and simultaneously take care of the babies, which are anticipated to drive the market in the forecast period.

Geographically, the baby finger food market is segmented into North America, Europe, AsiaPacific (APAC), South America, and Middle East & Africa (MEA).In 2019, North America held the largest share of the global baby finger food market, followed by Europe and Asia Pacific.

The largest market share of the region is primarily attributed to rise in production and consumption of baby finger food in developed and developing economies of North America.The region is witnessing increased demand from the US due to rising health consciousness, growing focus toward child nutrition, and strengthening brand marketing as well as increasing number of working women.

Increasing urbanization and changing lifestyles are propelling the demand for packaged baby foods in North America.Rise in modernization, coupled with increase in Internet users, is further driving the growth of online channels selling baby finger food.

Moreover, the trend of online shopping is on the rise owing to ease of accessibility. This trend is anticipated to positively impact the expansion of the baby finger food market in North America.

The COVID-19 pandemic first began in Wuhan, China, in December 2019, and since then, it has spread at a fast pace worldwide.As of September2020,

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health

More Hispanic workers impacted by Covid-19 in food processing and agriculture workplaces, CDC study finds

More Hispanic workers were impacted by the coronavirus pandemic in food processing plants, manufacturing plants and agriculture workplaces in the US last spring than workers of other races or ethnicities, a team led by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Monday.



a close up of a flower: Coronavirus has disproportionately impacted Hispanic workers, CDC study says.


© Reuters
Coronavirus has disproportionately impacted Hispanic workers, CDC study says.

The study found that nearly 73% of workers at meat and poultry plants and similar settings across the country who were diagnosed with the virus were Hispanic or Latino, despite accounting for only 37% of the work force in these work places.

“Our study supports findings from prior reports that part of the disproportionate burden of COVID-19 among some racial and ethnic minority groups is likely related to occupational risk,” the team wrote.

Officials across the country have been reporting for months that the pandemic was disproportionately impacting communities of color due to a variety of reasons, including working and living conditions as well as equitable access to healthcare.

The CDC examined information collected from state health departments about workers with confirmed Covid-19 in food processing and manufacturing plants and agricultural settings between March 1 and May 31.

Nearly 73% of people diagnosed with coronavirus were Hispanic or Latino, 6.3% were Black and 4.1% were Asian or Pacific Islander, the survey found. This suggests “Hispanic or Latino, non-Hispanic Black, and non-Hispanic Asian/Pacific Islander workers in these workplaces might be disproportionately affected by COVID-19,” the researchers wrote in the CDC journal Emerging Infectious Diseases.

The researchers found reports on mass testing in US meat and poultry plants revealed widespread coronavirus outbreaks and found high numbers of asymptomatic or presymptomatic infections.

High-density workplaces can cause a higher risk for transmission of Covid-19, the researchers reported.

“These findings support the need for comprehensive testing strategies, coupled with contact tracing and symptom screening, for high-density critical infrastructure workplaces to aid in identifying infections and reducing transmission within the workplace,” the study concluded.

Only 36 states reported data, and testing strategies varied by workplace so that influenced the number of cases detected, the CDC said. Plus workers hesitant to report illness could have led to an underestimation of cases among workers.

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medicine

Make, give, eat: Why dumplings are the medicine we need during a pandemic – Food and Dining – Austin American-Statesman

Every culture has a dumpling, and I want them all.

Pot stickers and pierogi, pasties and samosas, empanadas and ravioli. These are just a few of the hand pies and filled dumplings that people around the world reach for at family get-togethers, annual celebrations and weekday lunches.

The dumplings I knew as a kid weren’t really dumplings. Those thick, hand-cut noodles dropped into chicken stew dumplings are still a nostalgic comfort food, but those aren’t the dumplings that currently fill my freezer.

I’ve always tried to keep a little stash of Asian, Italian, Argentinean and Eastern European dumplings for quick dinners, but this year, that stash has grown into a stockpile. It must have something to do with the anxieties and uncertainties of the pandemic — plus all this time at home to cook — that have led to a larger-than-usual supply of dumplings that I can cook for a quick lunch or dinner.

In the past few weeks, I’ve been focused on making hundreds of Asian dumplings to give away to neighbors and friends, some of whom have welcomed babies during this year of the coronavirus. Reactions are almost identical each time I hand someone a bag, usually filled with some kind of frozen pork-and-scallion stuffed pot stickers: raised eyebrows, open mouth and some exclamation along the lines of “Oh, I love dumplings!”

During the past six months, I’ve written about making empanadas, pierogi and ravioli, but it wasn’t until this month’s one-person pot sticker parties that I started to wonder why I’ve been so drawn to dumplings this year.

So I reached out to C.K. Chin, the community-building restaurateur behind Wu Chow and Swift’s Attic. His downtown Chinese restaurant is now selling frozen dumplings by the dozens, and I knew Chin would help me sort out what it is about these little pockets of joy that makes them so magical.

Unlike lasagna, brisket or a big pot of soup, which are also definitely comfort foods, dumplings aren’t necessarily meant to feed a crowd — although they certainly can. Dumplings usually start the other way, with a group of people gathered around a table, with everyone putting their labor together to make something that can be divided and shared among them.

Once you’ve made all those dumplings — no matter what kind — you can store them in a freezer to feed your future self. Dumplings embody a certain kind of optimism, Chin says.

“In Asian cultures, dumplings carry deep symbolism. They are treated with a lot of reverence and good luck because they are shaped like gold ingots. Even if you don’t believe the mythos of it, it becomes a tradition in your house,” he says.

With humble origins, dumplings don’t need much to shine. In Asian cultures, the dough is usually made with flour, water and salt, and in the right hands, those ingredients can transform into an almost transparent skin that maintains a slightly chewy texture when boiled or fried. “It takes out-of-the-box thinking to make

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health

Food Allergy Testing for Eczema in Kids Varies By Specialty

Specialists vary on their opinion about the ordering of food allergy tests for children with eczema, a recent survey reveals.

A child with eczema will more likely be given food allergy tests if seen by an allergist or a pediatrician and less likely if seen by a general practitioner or dermatologist.



Dr Matthew Ridd

“In our survey, we found evidence of variation in practice and a spectrum of opinion on what to do to treat eczema in children,” Matthew Ridd, MD, University of Bristol, United Kingdom, told Medscape.

His clinician survey was sent to 155 healthcare providers. Findings were presented at FAAM-EUROBAT Digital this week. They revealed big differences in the way physicians follow up on eczema. For a child with eczema with reported reactions to food, 20 of 22 (91%) allergists and 22 of 30 (73%) pediatricians always order food allergy tests.

But only 16 of 65 (25%) general practitioners and 3 of 12 (25%) dermatologists always order tests in the same situation.

A total of 155 healthcare practitioners responded to the survey, sent by a UK research team. Of those, 26 were unable to order allergy tests. Of the remaining 129, 65 (50%) specialized in general practice, 30 (23%) in pediatrics, 22 (17%) in the treatment of allergies, and 12 (9%) in dermatology.

Their opinions varied on when to order food allergy tests. For children with severe eczema who had no prior reaction to food, 8 of 22 (36%) practitioners specializing in allergy said they would order food allergy tests, as did 9 of 30 (30%) in pediatrics.

Of those surveyed, only 6 of 65 in general practice (9%) said they would request an allergy test for severe eczema for a patient with no allergy history, and no dermatologists (0%) would order the tests.

Only if a parent specifically requested a food allergy test would practitioners respond in a similar way. About two thirds of all respondents said they would sometimes order the test if a parent asked (general practice, 75%; pediatrics, 63%; allergy, 68%; dermatology, 75%).

Ridd told Medscape that it’s not surprising there’s a wide variation in practice, inasmuch as the guidelines are quite convoluted and complex. “Eczema is a common problem, but we don’t have any good evidence to guide clinicians on when to consider food allergy as a possible cause.”

Current guidelines advise calling for allergy tests only when eczema is difficult to treat. “But this is a complex decision. We know that a third of children with eczema are at higher risk for food allergy,” Ridd said. A 2014 study published in Clinical and Experimental Allergy showed that infants with eczema are six times more likely to have egg allergy and 11 times more likely to have peanut allergy by 12 months than infants without eczema (Clin Exp Allergy. 2014;45:255-64).

Food allergy is a sticky subject, he said. “So we have to wonder, are general practitioners frightened to raise the question?…

“We definitely see uncertainty around it.”

He suspects that parents may also

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health

Live coronavirus found on frozen food packaging in China

Chinese health authorities investigating a recent Covid-19 outbreak say they have discovered live coronavirus on frozen food packaging, a finding that suggests the virus can survive in cold supply chains.



a display in a store filled with lots of food: Photograph: Roman Pilipey/EPA


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Roman Pilipey/EPA

On Saturday the Chinese Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said it had found traces of live Covid-19 on the outer packing of frozen cod in the eastern coastal city of Qingdao, marking the first time live coronavirus has been detected on the outside of refrigerated goods. Researchers were investigating the source of a recent cluster of cases linked to a hospital in Qingdao.



a bunch of items that are on display in a store: Frozen food in a store in Beijing.


© Photograph: Roman Pilipey/EPA
Frozen food in a store in Beijing.

Genetic traces have previously been found in samples of frozen food but no living virus has been isolated before. “It has been confirmed that contact with outer packaging contaminated by the new coronavirus can cause infection,” the agency said in a statement on its website, without specifying where the batch of frozen food came from.

China, which until the Qingdao outbreak had recorded no new local cases in 55 days, has been one of few countries to point to possible transmission through frozen food. When Beijing had a second outbreak in June after the virus had been largely contained, officials suggested the new cluster could have come from imported salmon.

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The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have said there has been no evidence that “handling food or consuming food is associated with Covid-19”. New Zealand ruled out the possibility that one of its first infections happened at a cold storage facility.

In August China increased inspection requirements for imports of frozen products after traces of the virus were found on frozen chicken wings from Brazil. Researchers have also detected the virus on imported shrimp and other frozen seafood.

The CDC did not say whether the outbreak in Qingdao was caused by the frozen food packaging. The outbreak, the first locally transmitted cases in almost two months, was traced back to two dock workers initially diagnosed as asymptomatic, who are believed to have infected 12 other people at a hospital.

It was not clear whether the dock workers contracted the virus from the packaging of frozen food. Still, the CDC warned those handling frozen products not to have direct contact with the goods.

The CDC said there had been no cases of consumers contracting the virus, and such a risk was low. But some residents have begun calling for a temporary ban on frozen food imports.

The CDC said that from a total of 2.98 million samples of food packaging, researchers found 22 samples that tested positive.

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health

Federal judge strikes down Trump rule that could have cut food stamps for nearly 700,000 unemployed Americans

A federal judge Sunday struck down a Trump administration rule that could have stripped food stamps from nearly 700,000 people, saying the US Department of Agriculture has been “icily silent” about how many Americans would have been denied benefits had the changes been in effect during the pandemic.



a person standing in front of a store: A sign alerting customers about SNAP food stamps benefits is displayed at a Brooklyn grocery store on December 5, 2019 in New York City.


© Scott Heins/Getty Images
A sign alerting customers about SNAP food stamps benefits is displayed at a Brooklyn grocery store on December 5, 2019 in New York City.

“The final rule at issue in this litigation radically and abruptly alters decades of regulatory practice, leaving states scrambling and exponentially increasing food insecurity for tens of thousands of Americans,” Chief Judge Beryl Howell of the US District Court in Washington, DC, wrote in a 67-page ruling, saying the agency has not adequately explained how the rule comports with federal statutes nor how it “makes sense.”

A coalition of attorneys general from 19 states, the District of Columbia and the City of New York filed a lawsuit in January, challenging the USDA rule.

The rule, announced in December, would have required more food stamp recipients to work in order to receive benefits by limiting states’ ability to waive existing work mandates. It had been scheduled to take effect on April 1, but Howell in mid-March blocked it from being implemented, and Congress suspended work mandates in the food stamp program as part of a coronavirus relief package that month.

The requirement could have resulted in 688,000 non-disabled, working-age adults without dependents losing their Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits, or SNAP, as food stamps are formally known, according to Agriculture Department estimates, which were calculated prior to the pandemic. It was expected to save $5.5 billion over five years.

Food stamp enrollment has soared during the outbreak as millions of Americans lost their jobs. More than 6 million people have signed up for benefits, as of May, a 17% increase, according to the ruling.

Nearly 43 million Americans were receiving benefits in April, according to the latest Agriculture Department data.

Hunger has risen amid the economic upheaval wrought by the pandemic. Many lined up at food banks, which distributed more than 1.9 billion meals between March and June, according to Feeding America, a network of 200 food banks and 60,000 food pantries and meal programs.

Some 10% of adults live in households where there was either sometimes or often not enough to eat in the last seven days, according to a Census Bureau survey from mid- to late-September.

In normal times, the food stamp program requires non-disabled, working-age adults without dependents to have jobs. They can only receive benefits for three months out of every 36-month period unless they are working or participating in training programs 20 hours a week. There were 2.9 million of these recipients in 2018 and nearly 74% of them were not employed, according to the agency.

The Agriculture Department did not immediately return a request seeking comment.

States can waive the work requirement for areas where unemployment is at

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health

Frozen Food Package Polluted by Living Coronavirus Could Cause Infection, China’s CDC Says | Top News

BEIJING (Reuters) – China’s disease control authority said on Saturday that contact with frozen food packaging contaminated by living new coronavirus could cause infection.

The conclusion came as the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) detected and isolated living coronavirus on the outer packaging of frozen cod during efforts to trace the virus in an outbreak reported last week in the city of Qingdao, the agency said on its website.

The finding, a world first, suggests it is possible for the virus to be conveyed over long distances via frozen goods, it said.

Two dock workers in Qingdao who were initially diagnosed as asymptomatic infections in September brought the virus to a chest hospital during quarantine due to insufficient disinfection and protection, leading to another 12 infections linked to the hospital, authorities said last week.

However, the CDC’s latest statement does not show solid proof that the two workers in Qingdao caught the virus from the packaging directly, rather than contracting the virus from somewhere else and then contaminating the food packaging they handled, said Jin Dong-Yan, a virology professor at the University of Hong Kong.

The CDC said no instance had been found of any consumer contracting the virus by having contact with frozen food and the risk of this happening remained very low.

Nonetheless it advised that workers who handle, process and sell frozen products should avoid direct skin contact with products that could possibly be polluted.

Staff should not touch their mouth or nose before taking off work garments that could possibly be contaminated without washing their hands and should take tests regularly, the agency said.

Prior to the CDC’s latest findings genetic traces of the virus had been found in some samples taken from frozen food or food packaging, but the amount of virus was low and no living virus was isolated, the agency said.

Only living virus can infect people, while samples containing dead virus could also test positive for virus traces, Jin said.

(Reporting by Roxanne Liu and Tony Munroe; Editing by David Holmes)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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health

Frozen food package polluted by living coronavirus could cause infection, China’s CDC says

BEIJING (Reuters) – China’s disease control authority said on Saturday that contact with frozen food packaging contaminated by living new coronavirus could cause infection.

The conclusion came as the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) detected and isolated living coronavirus on the outer packaging of frozen cod during efforts to trace the virus in an outbreak reported last week in the city of Qingdao, the agency said on its website.

The finding, a world first, suggests it is possible for the virus to be conveyed over long distances via frozen goods, it said.

Two dock workers in Qingdao who were initially diagnosed as asymptomatic infections in September brought the virus to a chest hospital during quarantine due to insufficient disinfection and protection, leading to another 12 infections linked to the hospital, authorities said last week.

However, the CDC’s latest statement does not show solid proof that the two workers in Qingdao caught the virus from the packaging directly, rather than contracting the virus from somewhere else and then contaminating the food packaging they handled, said Jin Dong-Yan, a virology professor at the University of Hong Kong.

The CDC said no instance had been found of any consumer contracting the virus by having contact with frozen food and the risk of this happening remained very low.

Nonetheless it advised that workers who handle, process and sell frozen products should avoid direct skin contact with products that could possibly be polluted.

Staff should not touch their mouth or nose before taking off work garments that could possibly be contaminated without washing their hands and should take tests regularly, the agency said.

Prior to the CDC’s latest findings genetic traces of the virus had been found in some samples taken from frozen food or food packaging, but the amount of virus was low and no living virus was isolated, the agency said.

Only living virus can infect people, while samples containing dead virus could also test positive for virus traces, Jin said.

(Reporting by Roxanne Liu and Tony Munroe; Editing by David Holmes)

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health

What To Know About World Food Day 2020

ACROSS AMERICA — Food is seen as a basic human right, yet the coronavirus pandemic has caused an unprecedented spike in hunger, affecting families right here in YOUR PATCH as well as others living in the far corners of the world.

In 2019, almost 690 million people around the world went hungry, an increase of 10 million people from 2018, according to the United Nations’ global State of Food Security and Nutrition report. Of the 2019 total, 35 million were in the United States.

The coronavirus pandemic has only exacerbated hunger.

The level of hunger in U.S. households almost tripled between 2019 and August of this year, according to an analysis of data from the Census Bureau and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

While it’s too soon to assess the full impact of coronavirus lockdowns and other containment measures, the United Nations report estimates that at minimum, another 83 million people — and possibly as many as 132 million — may go hungry in 2020.

To spur collective action among its 150 member countries and draw attention to the sheer number of people suffering from chronic hunger, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations created World Food Day. First celebrated in 1979, the day is observed annually on Oct. 16.

In honor of World Food Day, here are some key things to know about the day, food insecurity in the United States, and how you can help.

World Food Day adopts a different theme each year to highlight where work needs to be done.

Each year, World Food Day selects a theme, which often focuses on agriculture and the important role it plays in the food system. In previous years, themes have focused on climate change, family farming and food prices, among others.

This year, the COVID-19 pandemic has affected the entire global food system and laid bare its fragility. Border closures, trade restrictions and confinement measures have disrupted domestic and international food supply chains, according to the FAO website, ultimately reducing access to healthy and safe diets.

This year’s theme is “Grow, Nourish, Sustain. Together.” The theme is a “call for global solidarity” to help those affected recover from the coronavirus crisis. It also calls for using the pandemic as an opportunity to build a more resilient and robust food system.

If our food systems are not transformed, undernourishment and malnutrition will greatly increase by 2050.

Malnutrition in all its forms — undernutrition, micronutrient
deficiencies, as well as overweight and obesity — takes an estimated $3.5 trillion toll on the global economy each year.

Additionally, a combination of poor diets and sedentary lifestyles has led to soaring obesity rates, not only in developed countries but also low-income countries, where hunger and obesity often coexist. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, just over 42 percent of Americans are considered obese.

The FAO estimates undernourishment and malnutrition will only accelerate if income inequality, employment or access to basic services continue to deteriorate.

Events are

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