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medicine

Before undergoing aesthetic medicine procedures, make sure to verify these details

The unfortunate death of a young woman allegedly following a liposuction procedure in a beauty centre has been widely discussed among the public and aesthetic practitioners alike. It prompted me to write in to share some information concerning medical aesthetic practice in Malaysia.

The category of aesthetic medicine is relatively new. In 2013, the Health Ministry defined aesthetic medicine as “An area of medical practice which embraces multidisciplinary modalities dedicated to creating a harmonious physical and psychological balance through noninvasive, minimally invasive and invasive treatment modalities which are evidence-based. These modalities focus on the anatomy, physiology of the skin and its underlying structures to modify an otherwise ‘normal’ (nonpathological) appearance in order to satisfy the goals of the patient and are carried out by registered medical practitioners”.

There are many ways to classify aesthetic medicine procedures. It depends on the applicability of the procedure to the patient. The Health Ministry’s Aesthetic Medical Practice Committee classifies aesthetic procedures into three categories.

The first is noninvasive. “This is defined as external applications or treatment procedures that are carried out without creating a break in the skin or penetration of the integument. They target the epidermis only.”

Second is minimally invasive procedures. “This is defined as treatment procedures that induce minimal damage to the tissues at the point of entry of instruments. These procedures involve penetration or transgression of the integument but are limited to the subdermis and subcutaneous fat, not extending beyond the superficial musculoaponeurotic layer of the face and neck, or beyond the superficial fascial layer of the torso and limbs.”

Lastly, invasive procedures. “This is defined as treatment procedures that penetrate or break the skin through either perforation, incision or transgression of integument, subcutaneous and/or deeper tissues, often with extensive tissue involvement in both vertical and horizontal planes by various means, such as the use of knife, diathermy, ablative lasers, radiofrequency, ultrasound, cannula, and needles.”

In other words, the noninvasive procedures only target outer layers of the skin, such as a superficial chemical peel, intense pulsed light, and microdermabrasion. Minimally invasive procedures targets deeper skin layers and muscles and include treatments such as botulinum toxin or dermal fillers. Invasive procedures are all the surgical procedures that need cutting and perforating the inner layer of the human body and require specialised expertise for procedures such as such as nasoplasty or liposuction.

Who can perform medical aesthetic procedures?

According to the Private Healthcare Facilities And Services Act 1998, and the Aesthetic Medical Practice Guidelines 2013, aesthetic medicine procedures can only be performed by registered medical practitioners (doctors) with letters of credentialing and privileging in licensed premises. The regulations stipulate that all medical professionals need to follow very stringent rules before performing procedures to safeguard public health. The service provider’s (doctor/clinic/medical centre/hospital) obligation is to display all the certificates or documentation correctly for the patient to see.

In summary, before you agree to undergo aesthetic medicine procedures, make sure to verify:

> That the premises has its license displayed (clinic license from the

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Police Given Access to Details of People Told to Self-Isolate by UK Government’s System | World News

(Reuters) – British police forces have been granted access to details of people who have been told to self-isolate under the government’s ‘test and trace’ system, the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) said late on Saturday.

A spokesman for the department said it agreed with the National Police Chiefs Council (NPCC) that officers could have access on a case-by-case basis to information on whether a specific individual has been notified to self-isolate.

“The memorandum of understanding ensures that information is shared with appropriate safeguards and in accordance with the law. No testing or health data is shared in this process,” the spokesman said in an emailed statement.

The development was reported earlier by Sky News, which also cited an NPCC statement saying police will continue encouraging voluntary compliance but will enforce regulations and issue fixed penalty notices (FPN) when needed.

“Where people fail to self-isolate and refuse to comply, officers can issue FPNs and direct people to return to self-isolation. Officers will engage with individuals to establish their circumstances, using their discretion wherever it is reasonable to do so,” the NPCC statement said.

The test and trace system, which Prime Minister Boris Johnson promised would be world beating, has seen setbacks including a glitch identified earlier this month that delayed the upload of nearly 16,000 cases into computer systems, including for contact tracers.

In recent weeks, the COVID-19 infection rate has risen sharply in Britain with an accelerating second wave, prompting Johnson and other regional leaders to introduce tighter restrictions and local lockdowns.

Britain has one of the highest death rates from the virus in Europe and previously suffered the worst economic contraction of any leading nation from the outbreak.

(Reporting by Kanishka Singh; Editing by Daniel Wallis)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

Source Article

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health

Police given access to details of people told to self-isolate by UK government’s system

By Kanishka Singh

(Reuters) – British police forces have been granted access to details of people who have been told to self-isolate under the government’s ‘test and trace’ system, the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) said late on Saturday.

A spokesman for the department said it agreed with the National Police Chiefs Council (NPCC) that officers could have access on a case-by-case basis to information on whether a specific individual has been notified to self-isolate.

“The memorandum of understanding ensures that information is shared with appropriate safeguards and in accordance with the law. No testing or health data is shared in this process,” the spokesman said in an emailed statement.

The development was reported earlier by Sky News, which also cited an NPCC statement saying police will continue encouraging voluntary compliance but will enforce regulations and issue fixed penalty notices (FPN) when needed.

“Where people fail to self-isolate and refuse to comply, officers can issue FPNs and direct people to return to self-isolation. Officers will engage with individuals to establish their circumstances, using their discretion wherever it is reasonable to do so,” the NPCC statement said.

The test and trace system, which Prime Minister Boris Johnson promised would be world beating, has seen setbacks including a glitch identified earlier this month that delayed the upload of nearly 16,000 cases into computer systems, including for contact tracers.

In recent weeks, the COVID-19 infection rate has risen sharply in Britain with an accelerating second wave, prompting Johnson and other regional leaders to introduce tighter restrictions and local lockdowns.

Britain has one of the highest death rates from the virus in Europe and previously suffered the worst economic contraction of any leading nation from the outbreak.

(Reporting by Kanishka Singh; Editing by Daniel Wallis)

Source Article

Read More