Depression

medicine

Hestia Insight Inc. Begins Healthcare Operations; Treating Anxiety, Depression; Exploring Alternate Medicine

Las Vegas, NV – ( NewMediaWire ) – October 22, 2020 – Hestia Insight Inc. (OTC: HSTA) new subsidiary, HSTA Health Inc. (HHI), today announced that it has entered a business partnership with Noether Sciences and Technologies, Inc.   HHI will utilize Noether’s IP therapy to treat anxiety and depression and has licensing rights for the therapy throughout the U.S.

“These two most common diseases cause numerous societal problems.  We believe this innovative technology will provide excellent healthcare services and we look forward to marketing it to medical professionals,” said Edward C. Lee, Chairman and President of Hestia and President of HHI.

“We are coming out of a difficult period, with the COVID-19 pandemic, and we believe there are many innovative technologies that should be introduced in the healthcare industry and commercialized,” Mr. Lee said.  “For instance, the alternative medicine market size, a multi-billion-dollar sector, continues to grow.  This includes yoga, meditation, magnetic intervention, acupuncture, and other wellness treatments.  HHI will work to lead and expand this sector.  We are exploring the establishments of clinics throughout the U.S. to provide better patient healthcare.”

Mr. Lee also stressed that:  “Healthcare companies with great products and technology have not been able to enter the marketplace in an effective way, often being unaware on how to communicate with healthcare industry professionals.  We look forward to assisting in this effort, a huge opportunity in a new dimension to make a better life for everyone.”

“After COVID-19 we believe consumers are ready to adapt to a new healthcare ecosystem. It will bring more hope to consumers,” concluded Mr. Lee. “The global healthcare market reached a value of nearly $8,452 billion in 2018, having grown at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 7.3% since 2014, and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 8.9% to nearly $11,909 billion by 2022.”

ABOUT HESTIA INSIGHT INC.:  (www.hestiainsight.com) Hestia Insight Inc. is an advisory Company focused primarily on the great Healthcare and Biotech sectors. It also provides seed capital and mezzanine financing to its clients. Hestia Insight will make strategic acquisitions and mergers or joint ventures with emerging growth companies with intellectual properties. It provides sales and marketing guidance and capital market advice to increase the success of its clients.

(“Safe Harbor” Statement under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995: This press release contains or may contain forward-looking statements such as statements regarding the Company’s growth and profitability, growth strategy, liquidity and access to public markets, operating expense reduction, and trends in the industry in which the Company operates. The forward-looking statements contained in this press release are also subject to other risks and uncertainties, including those more fully described in the Company’s filings. The Company assumes no obligation to update these forward-looking statements to reflect actual results, changes in risks, uncertainties or assumptions underlying or affecting such statements, or for prospective events that may have a retroactive effect.)

Contact: Paul Knopick

pknopick@eandecommunications.com

940.262.3584

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health

More than 7 in 10 Gen-Zers report symptoms of depression during pandemic, survey finds

From increased stress and anxiety to rising levels of loneliness, the mental health consequences of the Covid-19 pandemic are wide-sweeping. A new survey from the American Psychological Association points to the age group that’s been hit hardest: Gen-Z.



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Gen-Z adults, those ages 18 to 23, reported the highest levels of stress compared to other generations and were the most likely age group to report symptoms of depression, according to the APA’s 2020 Stress in America survey.

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More than seven in 10 Gen-Z adults surveyed said they experienced common symptoms of depression in the prior two weeks, such as: feeling so tired they sat around and did nothing, having trouble thinking and concentrating and feeling very restless, lonely, miserable or unhappy.

So why is Gen-Z hit so hard with stress and depression during the pandemic? They are “experiencing adulthood at a time when the future looks uncertain,” while older generations might have more perspective that enables them to cope with the changes, according to the report.

Fear and anxiety tend to run hand-in-hand, Kevin Antshel, clinical psychologist and director of the clinical psychology program at Syracuse University previously told CNBC Make It. “The more things are uncertain, the more we’re going to fear, and the more we fear things, the more we are anxious,” he said. And prolonged anxiety can lead to depression.

The APA survey took place from Aug. 4 to Aug. 26. When asked to rank their stress level on a scale of one to 10 the prior month, Gen-Z adults said they experienced the highest level of stress, 6.1 out of 10, compared to other generations.

To put that in perspective, millennials (ages 24-41) ranked their stress level 5.6 out of 10, and Gen X (ages 42-55) said their stress was a 5.2 out of 10. The overall reported stress level for adults in 2020 is 5.0.

For Gen-Z teens, ages 13 to 17, 51% said that the pandemic made it impossible to plan for the future, and 67% of Gen-Z adults in college said the same. The Gen-Z adults in college also said that uncertainty about the school year was a significant source of stress.

There are a few strategies that the APA says can help decrease anxiety and build emotional resilience in young people. For starters, giving young people outlets to talk about issues that are troubling them is important. Practicing the rule of “three good things,” in which you reflect on three good things that happened at the end of the day, may be helpful the APA suggests.

It’s also crucial to remember that we are in the midst of a global pandemic, and we all may need more flexibility, space or support than usual, according to the APA.

The APA’s Stress in America survey was conducted with the Harris Poll and consisted of more than 3,000 adults ages 18 and older, plus a sample of 1,026 teens ages 13 to 17.  

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health

Depression in Pregnancy May Raise Risk of Childhood Asthma

A mother’s psychological distress during pregnancy may increase the risk for asthma in her child, a new study suggests.

Researchers had the parents of 4,231 children fill out well-validated questionnaires on psychological stress in the second trimester of pregnancy, and again three years later. The mothers also completed questionnaires at two and six months after giving birth. The study, in the journal Thorax, found that 362 of the mothers and 167 of the fathers had clinically significant psychological distress during the mothers’ pregnancies.

When the children were 10 years old, parents reported whether their child had ever been diagnosed with asthma. As an extra measure, the researchers tested the children using forced expiratory volume, or FEV, a standard clinical test of lung function.

After controlling for age, smoking during pregnancy, body mass index, a history of asthma and other factors, they found that maternal depression and anxiety during pregnancy was significantly associated with both diagnoses of asthma and poorer lung function in their children. There was no association between childhood asthma and parents’ psychological distress in the years after pregnancy, and no association with paternal psychological stress at any time.

“Of course, this could be only one of many causes of asthma,” said the lead author, Dr. Evelien R. van Meel of Erasmus University in Rotterdam, “but we corrected for many confounders, and we saw the effect only in mothers. This seems to suggest that there’s something going on in the uterus. But this is an observational study, and we can’t say that it’s a causal effect.”

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health

Severe Morning Sickness Linked to Depression Before and After Birth | Health News

By Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Women who suffer severe morning sickness may have higher risk of depression during and after pregnancy, according to a new British study.

It enrolled 214 women in London during the first trimester of pregnancy. Half had severe morning sickness; half did not. None had been treated for mental health conditions during the previous year.

The women’s mental health was assessed in their first trimester and six weeks after giving birth.

Nearly half of the women with severe morning sickness had depression in the first trimester and nearly 30% had depression after delivery. Among the women without morning sickness, the rates were 6% and 7%, respectively.

Half of the women with severe morning sickness had to take four or more weeks off work during or after pregnancy, according to findings published Oct. 14 in the journal BMJ Open.

Severe morning sickness, also known as hyperemesis gravidarum, is one of the most common reasons for hospitalization during pregnancy. Women with the condition are often severely nauseated with persistent vomiting. They can be bedridden for weeks, suffer dehydration and weight loss, and often can’t work or care for their other children.

But lead author Dr. Nicola Mitchell-Jones, a specialist registrar in obstetrics and gynecology at Imperial College London, said many health care providers don’t take the mental health impact of severe morning sickness seriously enough.

Women with severe morning sickness are about eight times more likely to suffer depression before giving birth and four times more likely to be depressed afterward, she said.

“Some women in the study even had thoughts of self-harm whilst suffering HG [hyperemesis gravidarum],” Mitchell-Jones said in a college news release. “These figures are shocking and should be reflected in the treatment women receive. We need to do much more than simply treat the physical symptoms of HG; assessment for mental health support should also be routine for any woman with the condition.”

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