Business

fitness

New Elkhorn fitness business mixes Pilates with treadmills | Articles

Omaha’s newest fitness studio has something to offer for all fitness levels, its owners said.

The Sculpt Studio, which mixes Pilates-style workouts with treadmill workouts, opened in late August in Elkhorn.

Owners Sarah Marshall and Emily Burg at teamed up to bring the concept to Omaha. The metro area already is home to several cycling studios, Marshall said.

“We wanted to bring something new and different,” she said.

Classes at Sculpt are high intensity and low-impact. They’re suitable for gymgoers of all fitness levels. Some clients have used the classes as complements to their existing fitness routines, Marshall said.

In one class, gymgoers use Mega former machines, which are similar to traditional Pilates machines. Participants work a muscle group until those muscles are fatigued before moving onto another group.

In another class, participants spend half the time on the Megaformers and half the time on Woodway Curve treadmills. The treadmills, which are curved on the bottom, are nonmotorized, so users control the speed by running or walking on them.

Classes are limited to 11 participants in the 2,000-squarefoot studio. Each class is 50 minutes.

Machines are spaced out in the studio, and they’re wiped off regularly. Gymgoers are required to wear masks until they reach their designated machine for class. Class times are spaced out to avoid clients overlapping as they come and go.

Source Article

Read More
health

Business mandates mount as New Mexico deals with virus surge

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham on Tuesday unveiled more requirements for businesses after a string of record-breaking daily case counts prompted renewed restrictions just last week.

Starting Friday, restaurants, breweries, retail stores, gyms and other businesses will be required to close for two weeks if they have more than four separate incidents of COVID-19 among employees within a 14-day period. Those businesses that have had at least two outbreaks will be listed on the state’s new watch list.

Restaurants that want to continue offering limited indoor dining must also complete specific training and keep a log of customers for at least three weeks. Retail stores must close by 10 p.m., and state-operated museums and historical sites will be closed until further notice.

Lujan Grisham said the restrictions are not meant to punish businesses but rather curb what has become one of the highest rates of spread in the U.S. New Mexico on Tuesday reported an additional 599 cases, bringing the total to nearly 37,900 since the pandemic began. Another seven deaths were reported, and hospitalizations have increased nearly 90% over the last two weeks.

“We don’t have much time,” the governor said during a briefing. “If we don’t attack and snuff out the virus right now by working collectively with businesses and each other, then the virus will win and it leaves us very little opportunity to save lives and to keep our health systems from being overrun.”

Despite having some of the strictest rules in the country, Lujan Grisham’s administration has been struggling in recent weeks with a surge in cases and increases in transmission and positivity rates. The governor said she believes the exponential increase is the result of people letting their guard down and not taking precautions.


The Republican Party of New Mexico called the latest requirements another attack on businesses, saying the Democratic governor’s policies during the pandemic have led to a collapsed economy, tens of thousands of job losses and hundreds of permanently shuttered restaurants.

“Locking down New Mexico more is not the answer,” party chairman Steve Pearce said, suggesting that the governor’s rules were arbitrary.

Under the state’s rapid response program, officials responded to more than 830 businesses during the past week. That marked a six-fold increase over the last month. Businesses on the watch list range from hospitals and medical marijuana operations to law firms, car dealerships, grocery stores and gas stations.

Sandia National Laboratories is among them. The state’s Occupational Health and Safety Bureau has opened an investigation of the lab after receiving a complaint about alleged violations of the state public health order.

A letter sent Monday by the bureau and obtained by The Associated Press alleges that Sandia failed to comply with the health order by not limiting operations to remote work to the greatest extent practicable to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The state claims employees were ordered to cease telework and report to work in-person.

The state is requiring the lab to inform

Read More
health

Crain’s New York Business Names VirtualHealth a Best Place to Work in New York City

VirtualHealth adds accolades to growing list of 2020 accomplishments recognizing its stand-out leadership and company culture

VirtualHealth, provider of HELIOS, the leading SaaS care management platform, has been named as one of the 2020 “Best Places to Work in New York City” by Crain’s New York Business. This is the first time that VirtualHealth has been recognized as a top employer by Crain’s, a trusted voice in the New York business community.

“From closing the office, to working remotely, to maintaining productivity and supporting our clients in their care of millions of Americans who are underserved, underprivileged, and elderly, every member of the VirtualHealth team has risen to new heights over the past year,” said Adam Sabloff, CEO of VirtualHealth. “2020 has tested our world, our country, and our city, but our industry is resilient and has mobilized in countless ways to support one another. We look forward to continuing to push the healthcare industry forward and providing the tools that power the proactive care movement.”

VirtualHealth is also being honored as one of the healthcare industry’s top workplaces. Modern Healthcare has ranked the company No. 44 on its annual list of the Best Places to Work in Healthcare. This award program identifies and recognizes outstanding employers from providers to suppliers nationwide.

VirtualHealth is a leader in healthcare management technology, and its employees work tirelessly to provide innovative solutions for the country’s leading health plans and healthcare organizations. VirtualHealth pivoted to remote work early in the pandemic to keep employees safe and continues to maintain a positive and connected remote work environment through engagement initiatives, training programs, and inspirational gifts. Employees of VirtualHealth also benefit from unlimited paid-time-off, flexible schedules, ongoing education to encourage professional growth, and more.

Crain’s New York Business partnered with independent research firm Best Companies Group to create this year’s list. More than 20,000 employees across the five boroughs were given a survey to account for the rankings. The complete list of this year’s winners, in alphabetical order, is available here.

Crain’s New York Business will also host a virtual event on December 3 to celebrate the 2020 Best Places to Work, and will announce the rankings in the small, mid-size and large company size categories, based on the number of New York-area employees.

Visit https://www.virtualhealth.com for more information about VirtualHealth. To explore open positions at VirtualHealth, click here.

About VirtualHealth

HELIOS by VirtualHealth is the first comprehensive care management platform purpose-built to power the entire ecosystem of value-based care. Utilized by some of the most innovative health plans in the country to manage millions of members, HELIOS streamlines person-centered care with intelligent case and disease management workflows, unmatched data integration, broad-spectrum collaboration, patient engagement, and configurable analytics and reporting. Named one of the fastest-growing companies in North America by Deloitte in 2018 and 2019, VirtualHealth empowers healthcare organizations to achieve enhanced outcomes, while maximizing efficiency, improving transparency, and lowering costs. For more information, visit www.virtualhealth.com.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201020005456/en/

Contacts

Media:

Read More
medicine

Business News | Stock and Share Market News


By

Read More
health

‘The impact of work’: On-the-job coronavirus exposure a key driver in Black, Latino communities | Business News

Because it was a nice afternoon in March, Katrina Llorens Joseph and her husband Albert decided to sit outside for lunch at the Subway restaurant not far from City Park.

Afterward, she went back to her desk at the VA Hospital, and he got behind the wheel of a city bus.

“He dropped me off at work and then he went on to work,” she said.

As routine as the lunch was, it now seems like a fateful one to Joseph, 52. The couple had been very careful about isolating. She believes her husband, 53, came in contact with the virus that day at an emergency meeting with a bunch of other bus drivers. Within a few weeks, 1 in 8 Regional Transit Authority employees would test positive in a COVID-19 outbreak that led to the deaths of three workers.

Antonio Travis is 27 years old and the picture of health.

Days after that lunch, Albert Joseph left work early, suffering from fevers, chills and a high fever.

His wife snapped into action. “I figured he had the virus,” she said.

Katrina Joseph moved to the guest room. She began wearing a mask in the house, pulled out new toothbrushes for everyone, wiped down doorknobs, washed her hands and served food on paper plates.

Even so, the whole family became infected. For the next few weeks, the couple and their daughter, Danielle, 19, were all bedridden in separate rooms of their house in Chalmette. They spiked 104-degree fevers. Sometimes, they collapsed on the way to the bathroom. On four separate occasions, when fingertip monitors indicated dangerously low oxygen levels, they called 911, though the ambulances twice left empty.



NO.deepdivide3.adv.007.jpg

Albert Joseph, a bus driver for RTA, poses in his home in Chalmette, La., Saturday, Sept. 5, 2020. The Joseph family suffered coronavirus at the same time.




Once, paramedics took an oxygen-deficient Albert Joseph to the hospital for a four-hour stay. The second time, they carried out a very weak Katrina Joseph. She spent eight days in Ochsner Health Center in St. Bernard Parish, “lying there, knowing that I had this disease that was killing people all around me.”

The Josephs’ story is hardly unusual. But leading researchers say their experience and others like it offer a window into why the coronavirus has hit Black communities particularly hard across the nation. Many frontline workers who continued to work through the pandemic were exposed on the job and brought the virus home to infect entire households.

Workplace spread a driver

Within Louisiana, Blacks have accounted for nearly half of all COVID-19 deaths to date, despite making up a little less than a third of state residents. The biggest reason for the coronavirus’ cruel toll in Black communities seems to be its outsized infection rate there: when compared with White Louisiana residents, Black Louisianans have been three times as likely to contract the virus.



101120 Racialized Pandemic Work Risks

A new, much-discussed study concluded that the disproportionate spread in the Black community originates in

Read More