Arizona

health

Texas woman died of COVID-19 while on board a plane from Arizona to Texas, officials say

A Texas woman died of COVID-19 while on board a plane from Arizona to Texas, officials said Sunday.

The woman, in her 30s, had difficulty breathing before the plane took off on July 25, according to Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.

“They tried to give her oxygen,” Jenkins said during a briefing. “It was not successful. She died on the jetway.”

READ ALSO: ‘Homophobic tactics’: Flyer for NEISD candidate puts quotation marks around opponent’s gay marriage

County officials knew a Garland resident had died in July, Jenkins told WFAA, but only recently received an autopsy report from an Arizona medical examiner that listed the virus as the cause of death.


“We don’t know a whole lot,” Jenkins said. “We may not know if she was aware she was sick.”

The woman, who has not been identified, had underlying high risk health conditions, according to a news release.

Jenkins said he did not have information on which airline the woman was traveling with, WFAA reported.

On Monday, Dallas officials announced 382 new coronavirus cases, bringing the total to 90,318 confirmed cases and 1,085 deaths.

Across the state, 2,273 cases and eight new deaths were reported, for a total of 828,527 cases and 17,022 deaths. As of Monday, 4,319 Texans were hospitalized for the coronavirus.

Source Article

Read More
health

Texas woman died of coronavirus ‘on the jetway’ on flight from Arizona

A Texas woman in her 30s died of Covid-19 while flying home from Arizona this summer, officials said Monday.

Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins told NBC Dallas-Fort Worth that the woman died in July, but that officials just learned of her official cause of death.

“It became difficult for her to breathe, and they tried to give her oxygen,” he told the station. “It was not successful. She died on the jetway.”

The woman, who was from the Dallas suburb of Garland, had underlying health conditions, according to a Dallas County news release. Additional information about her was not immediately available.

The disclosure comes as case counts continued to rise in 25 states, according to a 14-day average maintained by the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center. The data showed that new cases jumped in Texas last week after a dip the week before.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has continued relaxing coronavirus restrictions, with an executive order earlier this month allowing some bars to reopen at half capacity.

Jenkins criticized the move Monday, saying it can make people believe it’s safe to have friends over.

“We keep jumping the gun, and it puts us back in a situation which hurts public health and businesses and schools,” he told NBC Dallas-Fort Worth.

Experts have warned of a possible “third peak” of coronavirus cases as the holidays approach with what Dr. Carlos del Rio, an infectious diseases expert at the Emory University School of Medicine, described as six possible superspreader events.

“We can see a lot of disease happening,” he said.

Source Article

Read More
health

Arizona Among States With Lowest Childhood Obesity Rates

ARIZONA — Arizona is among U.S. states with the lowest rates of childhood obesity, says a new study released Wednesday by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

According to this year’s State of Childhood Obesity report, about 1 in 7 children nationwide are considered obese — or about 15.5 percent.

At 38th in the nation, our state falls lower than the U.S. average. This year’s report says roughly 12.1 percent of Arizona children ages 10 to 17 are considered obese.

“Childhood obesity remains an epidemic in this country,” Jamie Bussel, senior program officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, said in a release. “We must confront these current crises in ways that also support long-term health and equity for all children and families in the United States.”

The focus of this year’s report, according to a release by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, is prioritizing childhood health amid the coronavirus pandemic.

In the study, researchers say the pandemic and ongoing economic recession have worsened many of the broader factors that contribute to obesity, including poverty and health disparities.

Emerging research links obesity with increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19, including among children. Evidence from other vaccines also has led some experts to predict that a COVID-19 vaccine may be less effective in those with underlying medical conditions such as obesity.

The pandemic also exacerbates conditions that put children at risk for obesity.

School closures have left millions of children without a regular source of healthy meals or physical activity. In addition, millions of caregivers have lost income or jobs, making it more difficult for families to access or afford healthy foods.

To determine the most recent childhood obesity rates, the foundation used data from the 2018-19 National Survey of Children’s Health, along with information collected through a separate analysis conducted by the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Maternal and Child Health Bureau.

The report also highlights the obesity rates in younger children, high school students and adults. Here’s a look at how Arizona rates:

  • Children ages 2 to 4 (participating in WIC — the Women, Infants and Children nutrition program): 12.1 percent, or 41 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • High school students: 13.3 percent, or 35 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Adults: 31.4 percent, or 31 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Adults with diabetes: 10.9 percent, or 21 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Adults with hypertension: 32.5 percent, or 21 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

Here are a couple findings of note from this year’s report:

  • Childhood obesity is more prevalent in children of color: About 11.7 percent of white children are considered obese. Rates are significantly higher for Hispanic (20.7 percent), Black (22.9 percent), American Indian/Alaska Native (28.5 percent), and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander (39.8 percent) children.

  • Income also affects the prevalence of obesity: About 21.5 percent of youths in households making less than the federal poverty level were considered obese, more than double the 8.8 percent

Read More