Among

health

North Carolina Among States With Highest Childhood Obesity Rates

NORTH CAROLINA — North Carolina is among U.S. states with the highest rates of childhood obesity, says a new study released Wednesday by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

According to this year’s State of Childhood Obesity report, about 1 in 7 children nationwide are considered obese — or about 15.5 percent.

At No. 18 in the nation, our state falls higher rhan the U.S. average. This year’s report says roughly 16.1 percent of North Carolina children ages 10 to 17 are considered obese.

“Childhood obesity remains an epidemic in this country,” Jamie Bussel, senior program officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, said in a release. “We must confront these current crises in ways that also support long-term health and equity for all children and families in the United States.”

The focus of this year’s report, according to a release by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, is prioritizing childhood health amid the coronavirus pandemic.

In the study, researchers say the pandemic and ongoing economic recession have worsened many of the broader factors that contribute to obesity, including poverty and health disparities.

Emerging research links obesity with increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19, including among children. Evidence from other vaccines also has led some experts to predict that a COVID-19 vaccine may be less effective in those with underlying medical conditions such as obesity.

The pandemic also exacerbates conditions that put children at risk for obesity.

School closures have left millions of children without a regular source of healthy meals or physical activity. In addition, millions of caregivers have lost income or jobs, making it more difficult for families to access or afford healthy foods.

To determine the most recent childhood obesity rates, the foundation used data from the 2018-19 National Survey of Children’s Health, along with information collected through a separate analysis conducted by the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Maternal and Child Health Bureau.

The report also highlights the obesity rates in younger children, high school students and adults. Here’s a look at how North Carolina rates:

  • Children ages 2 to 4 (participating in WIC — the Women, Infants and Children nutrition program): 14.2 percent, or No. 25 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • High school students: 15.4 percent, or No. 18 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Adults: 34 percent, or No. 19 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Adults with diabetes: 11.8 percent, or No. 16 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Adults with hypertension: 35.1 percent, or No. 16 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

Here are a couple findings of note from this year’s report:

  • Childhood obesity is more prevalent in children of color: About 11.7 percent of white children are considered obese. Rates are significantly higher for Hispanic (20.7 percent), Black (22.9 percent), American Indian/Alaska Native (28.5 percent), and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander (39.8 percent) children.

  • Income also affects the prevalence of obesity: About 21.5 percent of youths in households making less than the federal poverty

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medicine

Traditional Chinese medicine popular among Russian elites amid epidemic

A Russian woman applies moxibustion to a boy to prevent virus. Photo: Courtesy of Huang Guorong

The Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has a history of more than 20 years spreading in Russia, especially among governmental officials and businessmen. With the development of COVID-19 epidemic in Russia, TCM has been gaining recognition in preventing virus and strengthening treatment.

The Global Times has learned that the wide use of TCM, such as Lianhua Qingwen Capsule, a Chinese herbal product, to treat COVID-19 has also helped TCM gain more attention in Russia.  

As early as in April, Lianhua Qingwen capsule has been approved for use in COVID-19 treatments in China. Beijing TCM authorities said the capsule can alleviate COVID-19 symptoms such as fever, cough and fatigue.

Zhang Boli, an academician with the Chinese Academy of Engineering, told the media in April that Russia is considering approving the capsule as a medicine. 

A Global Times reporter in Moscow noticed that a few Russian medicine websites translated the specification of the capsule in detail and the medicine can be purchased online.

Huang Guorong, a Moscow-based Chinese doctor who graduated from the Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, said that more Russians have been trying TCM to prevent COVID-19 since the epidemic developed in the country.

“Compared with the Western medicine using antibiotic, the TCM focuses on the mediation of the whole body, which defends the body through strengthening your immunity,” he told the Global Times.

Photo: IC

Even though there have been introductions on TCM on Russia’s TV or newspapers from time to time, and most people in the country have heard about it, only a small number have tried it.

“In Russia, TCM is not cheap,” he said. “And some kinds of herbs have not been approved by the medicine authority in Russia yet.”

But it is understood that “the rich and powerful people would recommend their friends to try TCM once they found it useful,” Huang said.

Li Yunhai, another prestigious Chinese doctor in Moscow, said some Russian officials visited TCM doctors during the epidemic for prevention and treatment. 

Li has received a Russian official who suffered from high blood pressure, weakness and asthma after recovering from COVID-19. Li gave him skin scraping, acupuncture and herbs, and after one course of treatment, the official recovered. 

Huang would not disclose how many clients from the high-level government officials he has received, but said they include  Moscow’s district officials and members of the State Duma.

Though he has not heard if President Putin has accepted TCM treatment, he does know a Russian friend who wrote to the president’s office to advocate the use of TCM in COVID-19 prevention and treatment across the country. “But we haven’t received a reply yet,” Huang said.

Former Russian president Boris Yeltsin had a TCM therapist, Huang said, adding that the 1990s was the time when the TCM was introduced to Russia and became popular among the officials and business people, he said.

Moreover, Tibetan medicine, similar in some ways to

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health

Colorado Among States With Lowest Childhood Obesity Rates

Colorado is among U.S. states with the lowest rates of childhood obesity, says a new study released Wednesday by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

According to this year’s State of Childhood Obesity report, about 1 in 7 children nationwide are considered obese — or about 15.5 percent.

At No. 45 in the nation, our state falls lower than the U.S. average. This year’s report says roughly 10.9 percent of Colorado children ages 10 to 17 are considered obese.

“Childhood obesity remains an epidemic in this country,” Jamie Bussel, senior program officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, said in a release. “We must confront these current crises in ways that also support long-term health and equity for all children and families in the United States.”

Don’t miss the latest coronavirus updates from health and government officials in Colorado. Sign up for free Patch news alerts and newsletters for what you need to know daily.

The focus of this year’s report, according to a release by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, is prioritizing childhood health amid the coronavirus pandemic.

In the study, researchers say the pandemic and ongoing economic recession have worsened many of the broader factors that contribute to obesity, including poverty and health disparities.

Emerging research links obesity with increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19, including among children. Evidence from other vaccines also has led some experts to predict that a COVID-19 vaccine may be less effective in those with underlying medical conditions such as obesity.

The pandemic also exacerbates conditions that put children at risk for obesity.

School closures have left millions of children without a regular source of healthy meals or physical activity. In addition, millions of caregivers have lost income or jobs, making it more difficult for families to access or afford healthy foods.

To determine the most recent childhood obesity rates, the foundation used data from the 2018-19 National Survey of Children’s Health, along with information collected through a separate analysis conducted by the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Maternal and Child Health Bureau.

The report also highlights the obesity rates in younger children, high school students and adults. Here’s a look at how Colorado rates:

  • Children ages 2 to 4 (participating in WIC — the Women, Infants and Children nutrition program): 8.1 percent, or 50 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • High school students: 10.3 percent, or 43 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Adults: 23.8 percent, or 49 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Adults with diabetes: 7 percent, or 50 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Adults with hypertension: 25.8 percent, or 50 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

Here are a couple findings of note from this year’s report:

  • Childhood obesity is more prevalent in children of color: About 11.7 percent of white children are considered obese. Rates are significantly higher for Hispanic (20.7 percent), Black (22.9 percent), American Indian/Alaska Native (28.5 percent), and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander (39.8 percent) children.

  • Income also

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health

Arizona Among States With Lowest Childhood Obesity Rates

ARIZONA — Arizona is among U.S. states with the lowest rates of childhood obesity, says a new study released Wednesday by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

According to this year’s State of Childhood Obesity report, about 1 in 7 children nationwide are considered obese — or about 15.5 percent.

At 38th in the nation, our state falls lower than the U.S. average. This year’s report says roughly 12.1 percent of Arizona children ages 10 to 17 are considered obese.

“Childhood obesity remains an epidemic in this country,” Jamie Bussel, senior program officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, said in a release. “We must confront these current crises in ways that also support long-term health and equity for all children and families in the United States.”

The focus of this year’s report, according to a release by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, is prioritizing childhood health amid the coronavirus pandemic.

In the study, researchers say the pandemic and ongoing economic recession have worsened many of the broader factors that contribute to obesity, including poverty and health disparities.

Emerging research links obesity with increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19, including among children. Evidence from other vaccines also has led some experts to predict that a COVID-19 vaccine may be less effective in those with underlying medical conditions such as obesity.

The pandemic also exacerbates conditions that put children at risk for obesity.

School closures have left millions of children without a regular source of healthy meals or physical activity. In addition, millions of caregivers have lost income or jobs, making it more difficult for families to access or afford healthy foods.

To determine the most recent childhood obesity rates, the foundation used data from the 2018-19 National Survey of Children’s Health, along with information collected through a separate analysis conducted by the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Maternal and Child Health Bureau.

The report also highlights the obesity rates in younger children, high school students and adults. Here’s a look at how Arizona rates:

  • Children ages 2 to 4 (participating in WIC — the Women, Infants and Children nutrition program): 12.1 percent, or 41 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • High school students: 13.3 percent, or 35 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Adults: 31.4 percent, or 31 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Adults with diabetes: 10.9 percent, or 21 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

  • Adults with hypertension: 32.5 percent, or 21 out of 50 states and Washington, D.C.

Here are a couple findings of note from this year’s report:

  • Childhood obesity is more prevalent in children of color: About 11.7 percent of white children are considered obese. Rates are significantly higher for Hispanic (20.7 percent), Black (22.9 percent), American Indian/Alaska Native (28.5 percent), and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander (39.8 percent) children.

  • Income also affects the prevalence of obesity: About 21.5 percent of youths in households making less than the federal poverty level were considered obese, more than double the 8.8 percent

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