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doTERRA Partners With World Bank in Kenya to Expand Access to Funding for Small-Scale Farmers

Development project will support fisheries and high-value agriculture chains

doTERRA Co-Impact Sourcing in Kenya

doTERRA Co-Impact Sourcing initiatives in Kenya provide smallholder farmers and harvesters with a stable income, regular agricultural training, and improved resources that encourage self-reliance.
doTERRA Co-Impact Sourcing initiatives in Kenya provide smallholder farmers and harvesters with a stable income, regular agricultural training, and improved resources that encourage self-reliance.
doTERRA Co-Impact Sourcing initiatives in Kenya provide smallholder farmers and harvesters with a stable income, regular agricultural training, and improved resources that encourage self-reliance.

PLEASANT GROVE, Utah and NAIROBI, Kenya, Oct. 20, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — doTERRA and its supply chain partners have connected with World Bank to improve access to funding for smallholder farmers in Kenya. The project is part of a broader plan called the Kenya Marine Fisheries and Socio-Economic Development Project (KEMFSED) that will support fisheries value chains, as well as high-value agriculture chains, including essential oil crops, within coastal fishing communities.

“When discussing the success of our farming initiatives in the region with representatives from World Bank, we began to brainstorm ways that we could work together to expand opportunities for even more individuals,” said Taylor MacKay, doTERRA strategic sourcing manager. “World Bank recognized our ability to truly support farmers and local communities through our Co-Impact Sourcing initiatives, and saw doTERRA as an implementation partner that could help them do even more in the region. It has been amazing to see this project take shape from the ground up—from idea generation to recommending other implementing organizations—we’re grateful for the opportunity to participate together in meaningful change.”

The KEMFSED project is slated to run for five years with an overall goal of enhancing livelihoods for individuals involved while safeguarding the integrity of associated ecosystems. If successful, the project has the potential to serve as a model for similar programs around the world.

One of doTERRA’s primary goals in Kenya is the formation of thriving cooperative farming groups within various communities across the region. In addition to providing opportunities for smallholder farmers, doTERRA is committed to supporting development projects improving overall community health and well-being. Learn more about doTERRA Co-Impact Sourcing and community development projects in Kenya.

About doTERRA

dōTERRA® International is an integrative health and wellness company and the world leader in the Global Aromatherapy and Essential Oils market. dōTERRA sources, tests, manufactures and distributes CPTG Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade® essential oils and essential oil products to over eight million dōTERRA Wellness Advocates and customers. Through industry leading responsible sourcing practices, dōTERRA maintains the highest levels of quality, purity and sustainability in partnership with local growers around the world through Cō-Impact Sourcing®. The dōTERRA Healing Hands Foundation®, a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, offers resources and tools to global sourcing communities and charitable organizations for self-reliance, healthcare, education, sanitation, and the fight against human trafficking. Through the life-enhancing benefits of essential oils, dōTERRA is changing the world one drop, one person, one community at a time. To learn more, visit www.doterra.com.

Contact:
Kevin Wilson
kawilson@doterra.com

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/ddd7b30d-9027-4b91-859d-c3f3652e6ce7

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Vaccine storage issues could leave 3B people without access

GAMPELA, Burkina Faso (AP) — The chain breaks here, in a tiny medical clinic in Burkina Faso that went nearly a year without a working refrigerator.

From factory to syringe, the world’s most promising coronavirus vaccine candidates need non-stop sterile refrigeration to stay potent and safe. But despite enormous strides in equipping developing countries to maintain the vaccine “cold chain,” nearly 3 billion of the world’s 7.8 billion people live where temperature-controlled storage is insufficient for an immunization campaign to bring COVID-19 under control.

The result: Poor people around the world who were among the hardest hit by the virus pandemic are also likely to be the last to recover from it.


The vaccine cold chain hurdle is just the latest disparity of the pandemic weighted against the poor, who more often live and work in crowded conditions that allow the virus to spread, have little access to medical oxygen that is vital to COVID-19 treatment, and whose health systems lack labs, supplies or technicians to carry out large-scale testing.

Maintaining the cold chain for coronavirus vaccines won’t be easy even in the richest of countries, especially when it comes to those that require ultracold temperatures of around minus 70 degrees Celsius (minus 94 F). Investment in infrastructure and cooling technology lags behind the high-speed leap that vaccine development has taken this year due to the virus.

With the pandemic now in its eighth month, logistics experts warn that vast parts of the world lack the refrigeration to administer an effective vaccination program. This includes most of Central Asia, much of India and southeast Asia, Latin America except for the largest countries, and all but a tiny corner of Africa.

The medical clinic outside Burkina Faso’s capital, a dirt-streaked building that serves a population of 11,000, is a microcosm of the obstacles.

After its refrigerator broke last fall, the clinic could no longer keep vaccines against tetanus, yellow fever, tuberculosis and other common diseases on site, nurse Julienne Zoungrana said. Staff instead used motorbikes to fetch vials in insulated carriers from a hospital in Ouagadougou, making a 40-minute round-trip drive on a narrow road that varies between dirt, gravel and pavement.

A mother of two who visits the Gampela clinic says she thinks a coronavirus inoculation program will be challenging in her part of the world. Adama Tapsoba, 24, walks four hours under scorching sun to get her baby his routine immunizations and often waits hours more to see a doctor. A week earlier, her 5-month-old son had missed a scheduled shot because Tapsoba’s daughter was sick and she could only bring one child on foot.

“It will be hard to get a (COIVD-19) vaccine,” Tapsoba said, bouncing her 5-month-old son on her lap outside the clinic. “People will have to wait at the hospital, and they might leave without getting it.”

To uphold the cold chain in developing nations, international organizations have overseen the installation of tens of thousands of solar-powered vaccine refrigerators. Keeping vaccines at stable temperatures from

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Police Given Access to Details of People Told to Self-Isolate by UK Government’s System | World News

(Reuters) – British police forces have been granted access to details of people who have been told to self-isolate under the government’s ‘test and trace’ system, the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) said late on Saturday.

A spokesman for the department said it agreed with the National Police Chiefs Council (NPCC) that officers could have access on a case-by-case basis to information on whether a specific individual has been notified to self-isolate.

“The memorandum of understanding ensures that information is shared with appropriate safeguards and in accordance with the law. No testing or health data is shared in this process,” the spokesman said in an emailed statement.

The development was reported earlier by Sky News, which also cited an NPCC statement saying police will continue encouraging voluntary compliance but will enforce regulations and issue fixed penalty notices (FPN) when needed.

“Where people fail to self-isolate and refuse to comply, officers can issue FPNs and direct people to return to self-isolation. Officers will engage with individuals to establish their circumstances, using their discretion wherever it is reasonable to do so,” the NPCC statement said.

The test and trace system, which Prime Minister Boris Johnson promised would be world beating, has seen setbacks including a glitch identified earlier this month that delayed the upload of nearly 16,000 cases into computer systems, including for contact tracers.

In recent weeks, the COVID-19 infection rate has risen sharply in Britain with an accelerating second wave, prompting Johnson and other regional leaders to introduce tighter restrictions and local lockdowns.

Britain has one of the highest death rates from the virus in Europe and previously suffered the worst economic contraction of any leading nation from the outbreak.

(Reporting by Kanishka Singh; Editing by Daniel Wallis)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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Police given access to details of people told to self-isolate by UK government’s system

By Kanishka Singh

(Reuters) – British police forces have been granted access to details of people who have been told to self-isolate under the government’s ‘test and trace’ system, the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) said late on Saturday.

A spokesman for the department said it agreed with the National Police Chiefs Council (NPCC) that officers could have access on a case-by-case basis to information on whether a specific individual has been notified to self-isolate.

“The memorandum of understanding ensures that information is shared with appropriate safeguards and in accordance with the law. No testing or health data is shared in this process,” the spokesman said in an emailed statement.

The development was reported earlier by Sky News, which also cited an NPCC statement saying police will continue encouraging voluntary compliance but will enforce regulations and issue fixed penalty notices (FPN) when needed.

“Where people fail to self-isolate and refuse to comply, officers can issue FPNs and direct people to return to self-isolation. Officers will engage with individuals to establish their circumstances, using their discretion wherever it is reasonable to do so,” the NPCC statement said.

The test and trace system, which Prime Minister Boris Johnson promised would be world beating, has seen setbacks including a glitch identified earlier this month that delayed the upload of nearly 16,000 cases into computer systems, including for contact tracers.

In recent weeks, the COVID-19 infection rate has risen sharply in Britain with an accelerating second wave, prompting Johnson and other regional leaders to introduce tighter restrictions and local lockdowns.

Britain has one of the highest death rates from the virus in Europe and previously suffered the worst economic contraction of any leading nation from the outbreak.

(Reporting by Kanishka Singh; Editing by Daniel Wallis)

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